Graduate Psychology Program

Master of Arts: Counseling

Master of Arts: Counseling Psychology

Master of Marriage and Family Therapy

Ph.D. Clinical Counseling: Teaching and Supervision

Graduate Psychology Program

615-248-1384

email: admissions_psy@tevecca.edu

www.trevecca.edu/gradpsychology

Graduate Studies

The graduate psychology program offers master of arts and master of marriage and family therapy degrees as well as a Ph.D. degree. The Graduate Committee is responsible for the approval of all graduate programs and policies.

Students in the M.A., M.M.F.T. and Ph.D. programs normally start with an assigned group or cycle of students. In the master's program, cycles are started in the fall, spring, and summer semesters. The Ph.D. program starts a new group in the fall semester only. The University is not responsible for any changes or delays in graduation for students who change cycles or begin a cycle late. The University may combine cycles as needed.

Statement of Purpose

There are three master's degrees offered in the Graduate Psychology Program: master's in counseling, master's in counseling psychology and master's in marriage and family therapy. These degrees provide advanced study beyond the baccalaureate degree and are designed for several groups: (a) those who wish to develop skills as a therapist, (b) those who wish to pursue a career in the mental health delivery system, (c) those who wish to establish a private practice as a mental health provider, (d) those who desire to pursue licensure as a professional counselor or marriage and family therapist and (e) in the case of counseling psychology, those who desire to do psychological testing as a certified psychological assistant.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate with a M.A. or M.M.F.T. degree from the Graduate Psychology Program should:

  1. Possess a knowledge of the field of counseling, counseling psychology and marriage and family therapy.
  2. Demonstrate therapeutic skills both in the classroom and in their practicum experience.
  3. Possess the ability to read and critique research articles and apply the knowledge learned to current problems and issues.
  4. Meet the academic requirements for licensure in their chosen mental health field.
  5. Possess the ability to integrate the principles of psychology with a Christian worldview.

Admissions (Master's Degrees)

Admissions Categories

Three broad categories of graduate students are recognized:

Admissions Requirements

Those applicants who submit the appropriate forms by the application deadline for the fall, spring, or summer semesters and meet admissions criteria will be scheduled for an interview with the Admissions Committee. The Admissions Committee makes final determination on whether a student is admitted into the program as a degree seeking student.

Students who wish to study in the Graduate Psychology Program must submit the appropriate forms to the graduate psychology office.

  1. Application with $25 nonrefundable fee.
  2. Official transcripts from all colleges/universities attended indicating a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7 on all undergraduate and graduate coursework combined. The baccalaureate degree must be from a regionally accredited institution. Transcripts must be mailed directly to the graduate psychology office.
  3. Evidence of a minimum test score of 380 on the Miller Analogies Test or a minimum score of 800 (combined verbal and quantitative) on the Graduate Record Examination.
  4. Two (2) completed reference assessment forms.
  5. TOEFL Score: International Students/Students who speak English as Second language must submit scores from the TOEFL with a minimum score of 600 on paper version of test or 250 on computer version of test.

Please submit all program admission documents to Graduate Psychology Program, Trevecca Nazarene University, 333 Murfreesboro Road, Nashville, Tennessee 37210-2877. E-mail: admissions_psy@trevecca.edu .

Admissions Appeal Procedure

An applicant who is denied admission and wishes to appeal that denial must complete the following:

  1. A request in writing for a review of his or her admission file.
  2. All appropriate transcripts, test scores, and reference assessment forms must be available for review.
  3. A personal interview with the program director and appropriate faculty (Admissions Committee) if requested.

Admission on Academic Restriction

Admission to the master's programs is based on a 2.7 GPA, a score of 380 on the MAT, or a score of 800 on the GRE. Students not meeting all program admission guidelines may be admitted on academic restriction upon recommendation of the director of the Graduate Psychology Program.

The admission on academic restriction status will be removed when the enrollee has completed the first three courses with a minimum grade of B in each of these courses. Failure to meet this stipulation during any of the first three courses will result in disenrollment.

Special Admissions Requirement for Counseling Psychology

The student must take fifteen (15) semester hours of psychology courses as prerequisites for admission to candidacy. These prerequisites may be graduate or undergraduate courses. This requirement cannot be met with courses required of the Counseling Psychology Program.

General Academic Requirements (Master's Degrees)

Unless otherwise stated, the policies in this section apply to both degree-seeking and non-degree graduate students.

Program Design

The design of the graduate program is unique in that each core course consists of six sessions for a minimum of 36 clock hours. This format dictates that there be a variety of instructional strategies including lecture, group projects, small group discussions, multimedia presentations, guest speakers, and instructor-student interactions.

Academic Load

Six (6) hours is considered a full-time load. Students may accelerate the program by taking additional courses during the week, in the afternoon, evening, or on Saturday in order to complete the program of study at a faster rate.

Attendance Policy

An unexcused absence from a six-session course or two unexcused absences from a twelve-session course results in a penalty of one letter grade; two absences from a six-session course or four absences from a twelve-session course result in disenrollment from the course. When absent the student is responsible for notifying the instructor and making up the work according to the instructor's directions. An absence form must be submitted in writing to the director of the Graduate Psychology Program, who will decide if the absence is unexcused or excused. The form is required for any absence.

Advising and Admission to Candidacy

Upon entering the Graduate Psychology Program, students are informed by letter as to the name of their Trevecca academic advisor. All advisors are full-time professional educators with the University. The assigned advisors continue to advise the students throughout the program. On occasion students are reassigned advisors because of changes in their program of study.

Students are encouraged to maintain contact with their advisors. There are three formally structured times in which students are evaluated by their Trevecca advisor and/or program director.

  1. In the letters they receive designating their advisors, students are encouraged to contact their advisors to set up a meeting to discuss their program of study and/or any other concerns they have about the program. This meeting is to occur during the student's first semester of the program. It is at this meeting that any transfer credit hours are evaluated. This is also the time for students and advisors to jointly prepare a schedule of course work depending on the program of study and whether or not students are taking a normal load of six hours or are accelerating the program by taking a larger number of hours each semester.
  2. By the end of the semester in which students complete twelve (12) hours in the program (not counting transfer hours), the admission to candidacy form must be submitted. Admission to candidacy forms are available on-line and in the Office of Graduate Psychology. This is a critical point in the program. Students may take up to six additional hours while going through the candidacy process. Failure to submit an admission to candidacy form or failure to receive approval for candidacy will delay or terminate a student's completion of the program. No degree seeking student will be permitted to take more than eighteen hours without a completed and approved admission to candidacy form. There are two levels of approval: Continuation of Program and Continuation with Remedial Action. In the latter case, specific recommendations for remedial action must be successfully completed by a designated timeline set by the advisor. Remedial action may involve but not be limited to professional therapy, testing, taking a break from the program or engaging in specific activities that will encourage growth. Students failing to remediate within the designated timeline will be placed on probation and a notice given for dismissal from the program if remediation is not forthcoming or successfully completed by a newly established timeline set by the program director.
  3. The third point of contact takes place toward the end of the program of study (prior to students starting their practicum experiences). At this point, transcripts are evaluated to determine if the necessary courses have been completed prior to initiating the practicum experience and to ascertain that the transcript is accurate. A plan to complete any necessary courses or electives is agreed upon between the student and the academic advisor and/or the program director. Also, any remedial issues identified earlier in the program or recently surfaced remedial issues must be resolved before students are permitted to start their practicum experiences.

It is important to note that evaluations of students go beyond academic performance. Students may demonstrate academic excellence but fail to demonstrate the professional conduct and clinical skills needed to work with clients in practicum/internship settings. When issues of "suitability" surface, the goal is to work with these students. If remediation is not successfully completed by designated timelines, students will be placed on probation and eventually dismissed from the program if the recommended remedial plan is not satisfactorily completed. Dismissal from the program can also be implemented without any prior remedial action or probation if there is a serious violation of anything that normally results in restriction or discipline as a mental health professional (moral or ethical violations), any serious misconduct in violation of school policies (ex: plagiarism), or failure to represent the University in a professional manner at a practicum/internship site.

Those who teach and supervise students in the Graduate Psychology Program are encouraged to identify students who they believe may have issues of "suitability" as it relates to entering the mental health profession. Professor/Supervisor Concern Regarding Student Preparation forms are provided to all full-time and adjunct professors and supervisors. Concerns filed by professors and supervisors are passed on to those who advise students in the program to be considered during structured evaluation times.

In cases of remediation, probation or dismissal, students may appeal decisions of academic advisors and/or the director of the graduate psychology program to the associate provost and dean of academic affairs.

In addition to these formally structured points of contact that are experienced by all students, those who enter the program on academic restriction are counseled by their academic advisors and/or the program director after completing nine hours in the program. Students receiving a grade below B- are also counseled prior to the next course or courses. This counsel may take the form of a letter from the director or assistant director of the graduate psychology program.

Grading

The grading system for this program is as follows:

 

Quality Points

Per Semester Hour

Exceptional

A

4.0

 

A–

3.7

Superior

B+

3.3

 

B

3.0

 

B–

2.7

Average

C+

2.3

 

C

2.0

 

C–

1.7

Passing

D+

1.3

 

D

1.0

 

D–

0.7

Failing

F

0.0

Incomplete

I

0.0

Withdrawal

W

0.0

NOTE: Exceptions to this scale will be noted in course syllabi.

Probation/Suspension Policy

Any student making a grade of C- in any course will be automatically placed on academic probation. He or she may continue in the program but must repeat that course with a later group.

Each student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) each semester to remain in academic "good standing." If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, after the completion of nine semester hours, the student will be placed on academic probation for the following semester. Upon regaining the required cumulative average (3.0), the student will again be in good standing; however, if the student does not increase the cumulative average to 3.0 during the probationary semester, he or she will be placed on academic suspension for the subsequent semester and may reapply to the Admissions Committee for reinstatement after a three month waiting period. The student will be assigned to a later group if reinstated by the Admission Committee.

Any student making a grade of D+ or below in any course will be automatically placed on academic suspension. After a three month waiting period, the student may petition to return to the program. If reinstated by the Admission Committee, the student may repeat the course with a later group and (if achieving a grade of C or better) may continue in the program sequences with that later group.

Any student receiving more than one grade of D+ or below will be permanently dismissed from the program.

Course Evaluation and Assessment

A Course and Instructor Evaluation is administered at the end of courses. Forms are distributed, collected, placed in a sealed envelope and returned to the administrative assistant of the graduate psychology program. In order to maintain high quality instruction in all classes, instructors receive the results of the evaluations after all grades have been submitted. An evaluation of the program takes place at the Comprehensive Exam.

Master's Degree Requirements

To receive the master degree, a student must meet the following academic requirements:

  1. Complete the required number of semester hours of credit with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0. Students earning a C- or below on any course will be required to repeat that particular course.

    While maintaining a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, two course grades of C+ or C will be allowed for graduate degree purposes.

  2. Submit candidacy form upon completion of 12 semester hours.
  3. Successfully complete a comprehensive exam, which is typically taken during the student's first semester of practicum. If a student is unsuccessful in passing the exam on the first attempt, he or she is required to contact his or her academic advisor who will suggest preparation options for retaking the exam.

    A student who has not successfully completed the comprehensive exam after two attempts has the option of requesting a meeting with the Graduate Psychology Admissions Committee, which will work collaboratively with the student to draw up a remediation plan. Remediation may involve (but not be limited to) a detailed study program, auditing a completed course in the area of weakness or taking additional courses. Upon completing the remediation plan, the student may retake the comprehensive examination.

    A student who fails the comprehensive exam a third time will be terminated from the program without a degree.

  4. All requirements for the M.A. and M.M.F.T. degrees must be met within a six-year period after the student enters the graduate program. Any exceptions to the policy are granted by the director of the graduate psychology program.
  5. Submit an application for graduation to the graduate psychology office. Any exceptions to this policy are granted by the director of the graduate psychology program.
  6. The residency requirement for the M.A. and the M.M.F.T. degree is 51 hours (60 hours - 9 potential transfer hours).

Summary of Steps toward the Master's Degree

Curriculum: Master of Arts: Counseling

GENERAL COUNSELING CORE

CSL 5220

Lifespan Development

3

CSL 5420

Personality Theory

3

CSL 5430

Group Therapy and Process

3

CSL 5231

Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy

3

CSL 5250

Counseling Diverse Populations

3

CSL 5240

Advanced Abnormal Psychology

3

CSL 5390

Effective Treatments in Therapy

3

CSL 5472

Professional Standards and Ethics

3

CSL 5100

Introduction to Psychological Research

3

CSL 5441

Introduction to Psychological Testing

3

CSL 5330

Chemical Use and Abuse

3

CSL 5230

Career Counseling: Theory and Practice

3

CSL 5482

Practicum: Techniques and Interventions I

3

CSL 5483

Practicum: Techniques and Interventions II

3

SPECIFIC COUNSELING CORE

CSL 5447

Internship in Counseling I

3

CSL 5448

Internship in Counseling II

3

CSL 5449

Internship in Counseling III

3

CSL

Elective

9

TOTAL REQUIRED

60

This program allows for three electives (9hours). Nine (9) hours of transfer credit is allowed.

This program is typically taken by those interested in pursuing licensure as a licensed professional counselor (LPC-MHSP).

Curriculum: Master of Marriage and Family Therapy

GENERAL COUNSELING CORE

CSL 5220

Lifespan Development

3

CSL 5420

Personality Theory

3

MFT 5200

Systems Theory and Family Therapy

3

MFT 5511

Marital Life-Cycle

3

CSL 5250

Counseling Diverse Populations

3

CSL 5240

Advanced Abnormal Psychology

3

CSL 5390

Effective Treatments in Therapy

3

CSL 5472

Professional Standards and Ethics

3

CSL 5100

Introduction to Psychological Research

3

CSL 5441

Introduction to Psychological Testing

3

CSL 5330

Chemical Use and Abuse

3

 

or

 

CSL 5430

Group Therapy and Process

 

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY CORE:

MFT 5350

Marital Therapy

3

MFT 5355

Advanced Marital Therapy

3

MFT 5510

Divorce and Divorce Adjustment

3

MFT 5400

Marital Therapy: Crisis Situations and Sexuality

3

MFT 5512

The Child in the Family System

3

MFT 5351

Family Therapy

3

MFT 5530

Professional Seminar: Ethical Standards

1

MFT 5531

Professional Seminar: Professional Identity

1

MFT 5532

Professional Seminar: Professional Context

1

MFT 5457

Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy I

3

MFT 5458

Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy II

3

TOTAL REQUIRED

60

This program allows for no electives. Nine (9) hours of transfer credit is allowed.

This program is typically taken by those interested in pursuing licensure as a marital and family therapist.

Curriculum: Master of Arts: Counseling Psychology

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY CORE

PSY 5220

Lifespan Development

3

PSY 5420

Personality Theory

3

PSY 5430

Group Therapy and Process

3

PSY 5231

Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy

3

PSY 5250

Counseling Diverse Populations

3

PSY 5240

Advanced Abnormal Psychology

3

PSY 5390

Effective Treatments in Therapy

3

PSY 5472

Professional Standards and Ethics

3

PSY 5100

Introduction to Psychological Research

3

PSY 5441

Introduction to Psychological Testing

3

PSY 5330

Chemical Use and Abuse

3

PSY 5230

Career Counseling: Theory and Practice

3

PSY 5482

Practicum: Techniques and Interventions I

3

PSY 5483

Practicum: Techniques and Interventions II

3

SPECIFIC PSYCHOLOGY CORE

PSY 5442

Statistical Analysis/Research Design

3

PSY 5443

Objective Personality Analysis

3

PSY 5444

Individual Intelligence Assessment

3

PSY 5458

Internship in Counseling Psychology I

3

PSY 5459

Internship in Counseling Psychology II

3

PSY 5920

Master's Thesis

3

TOTAL REQUIRED

60

This program allows for no electives. Nine (9) hours of transfer credit is allowed.

This program is typically taken by those interested in pursuing certification as a psychological assistant (CPA), a doctoral degree in psychology and/or licensure as a licensed professional counselor (LPC-MHSP).

There is a prerequisite of fifteen (15) semester hours of undergraduate or graduate psychology for this program.

Graduate Course Descriptions

COUNSELING

CSL 5100 Introduction to Psychological Research (3)

Designed to give an introduction to research strategies with an emphasis on counseling and psychological problems. Emphasis will be on the development of a proposal for a major research project or thesis. Also offered as PSY 5100.

CSL 5200 Systems Theory and Family Therapy (3)

Introduces the theory and basic underlying assumptions of a systems framework to marriage and family therapy. The emphasis is on identifying the characteristics of healthy family functioning and conceptualizing human problems as they are related to the functioning of systems. Also offered as MFT 5200.

CSL 5220 Lifespan Development (3)

Looks at the survey of research throughout the entire lifespan including findings in the areas of physical, emotional, cognitive, and interpersonal growth and development. Also offered as PSY 5220.

CSL 5230 Career Counseling: Theory and Practice (3)

An examination of the current trends in career development and life choices. The students will develop a knowledge base concerning career theories and techniques for exploring the interests, aptitudes, and values of clients in order to assist them in making reasoned career and lifestyle decisions. Also offered as PSY 5230.

CSL 5231 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)

Integration and study of the traditional and currently developing theories of counseling and psychotherapy and their application. Also offered as PSY 5231.

CSL 5240 Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3)

Focuses on patterns of abnormal behavior including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, antisocial behavior, and mental retardation. These patterns of abnormal behavior are discussed and related to DSM-IV TR diagnosis. Also offered as PSY 5240.

CSL 5250 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)

An overview of counseling strategies useful with varied populations. Counseling skills helpful with clients of different racial, economic, religious, and sexual orientations will also be examined. Also offered as PSY 5250.

CSL 5320 Grief Counseling (3)

Provides a presentation of practical, theoretical, and social aspects of the dying process. Students will develop skills in counseling the bereaved and in handling grief.

CSL 5330 Chemical Use and Abuse (3)

Includes topics on historical, medical, psychological, and family dynamics of the treatment process for chemical dependency. An understanding of the many classes of drugs and their effects on the dependent person will be developed. Also offered as PSY 5330.

CSL 5350 Marital Therapy (3)

An introduction to the understanding and practice of marital therapy. Students will focus on developing a set of universally accepted basic skills with special attention given to the early phases of treating dyadic problems. Additional attention will be given to recognizing common problem presentations and developing diagnostic and intervention skills based on various theoretical approaches. Also offered as MFT 5350.

CSL 5351 Family Therapy (3)

Introduces the understanding and practicing of family therapy. Focus will be on developing both diagnostic and intervention skills in regards to treating problems within the context of the family. Special attention will be given to differentiating between various approaches within the purview of family systems theory. Also offered as MFT 5351.

CSL 5355 Advanced Marital Therapy (3)

An advanced seminar in couple's therapy. The course will explore the roles of (1) family-of-origin influence and (2) emotion in intimate relationships and clinical practice with couples. Special attention is given to the development and integration of the clinical skills used in (1) transgenerational and (2) emotionally focused couple therapies. Also offered as MFT 5355.

CSL 5390 Effective Treatments in Therapy (3)

Provides an overview and discussion of the effective treatments of various psychological disorders. A focus will be placed on treatment planning and evaluating outcomes in therapy. Also offered as PSY 5390.

CSL 5400 Marital Therapy: Crisis Situations and Sexuality (3)

Designed to give attention to the special problems presented by (1) crisis situations and (2) sexuality. Regarding crisis presentations, common marital presentations will be studied (abusive relationships, marital separation, infidelity, etc.) with attention given to both recognition and appropriate intervention strategies. Regarding sexuality, healthy and problematic areas of sexual functioning will be studied with special attention given to assessment and diagnostic skills for identifying sexual dysfunction and correspondingly appropriate treatment regimens. Also offered as MFT 5400.

CSL 5410 Diagnosis and Treatment of Personality Disorders (3)

Designed to provide an understanding of patterns of abnormal behavior as they relate to the Axis II personality disorders. Diagnosis and treatment will be developed. Prerequisite CSL 5240 Advanced Abnormal Psychology.

CSL 5420 Personality Theory (3)

The psychology of personality cannot be approached from a single theoretical orientation; rather one must discuss theories of personality. Thus, the aim of this course is to discuss some of the leading theories of personality held by those individuals who have pioneered the field. Also offered as PSY 5420.

CSL 5430 Group Therapy and Process (3)

Examines group techniques and application to counseling settings. Various ethnic and socioeconomic groups will be emphasized. Also offered as PSY 5430.

CSL 5441 Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)

An overview of test construction, selection, and application will be the focus of this course. Legal and ethical administration of tests for ability, intelligence, attitudes, values and personality will also be examined. Experience in taking and administering sample instruments will be provided. Also offered as PSY 5441.

CSL 5447 Internship in Counseling I (3)

Provides practical supervised experience in beginning counseling skills. It includes the development of relationship building and exploratory (fact-finding) skills as well as skills in intervention and treatment planning in a mental health/community agency setting. Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site under appropriate supervision of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact. (internship fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

CSL 5448 Internship in Counseling II (3)

As a continuation of Internship in Counseling I, the course provides practical supervised experience in a mental health or community agency. It includes the development of relationship building and exploratory (fact-finding) skills as well as skills in intervention and treatment planning. Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site under appropriate supervision of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact. (internship fee). Under certain circumstances internship may be extended.*

CSL 5449 Internship in Counseling III (3)

As a continuation of Internship in Counseling I and II, the course provides practical supervised experience in a mental health or community agency. It includes the development of relationship building and exploratory (fact-finding) skills as well as skills in intervention and treatment planning. Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site under appropriate supervision of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact. (internship fee). Under certain circumstances internship may be extended.*

CSL 5472 Professional Standards and Ethics (3)

Emphasizes the development, understanding, and application of ethical standards in the theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. The Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct of the American Psychological Association (APA) will be studied along with other professional standards of practice and credentialing. Also offered as PSY 5472.

CSL 5482 Practicum: Techniques and Interventions I (3)

A study of counseling paradigms with a special emphasis on the beginning stage of therapy is the focus of this course. Counseling techniques and cognitive, affective, and behavioral interventions will be shared, evaluated, demonstrated, and practiced both in the classroom and in a practicum setting. Students will be expected to initiate a practicum experience that will continue into the next course, PSY/CSL 5483 Practicum: Techniques and Intervention II. All totaled the practicum will total 100 hours with 40 of the 100 hours being in direct client contact (group therapy, co-therapy, client intakes, individual therapy, etc.). Also offered as PSY 5482.

CSL 5483 Practicum: Techniques and Interventions II (3)

The purpose of this course is to prepare, equip, and direct the student in his/her practicum experience and assist in the internship placement process. This course will simulate the skills needed to have a successful practicum and internship experience. With emphasis on role-play and other practical activities, students will demonstrate entry level counseling skills as well as the operational skills required for functioning within an agency setting. As a course marking the consummation of academic and classroom training and the transition to actual practice, each student will demonstrate initial competency in a chosen counseling model consistent with the goals and purposes of this program. By the end of this course the student will have completed a 100 hour practicum of which 40 of the 100 hours will have been in direct client contact (group therapy, co-therapy, client intakes, individual therapy, etc.). Prerequisite CSL 5482. Also offered as PSY 5483.

CSL 5510 Divorce and Divorce Adjustment (3)

A study of the contemporary family through the avenue of the divorce experience. The primary concern will be an understanding of the cultural influences that fostered a rise in the divorce rate, the changes that this phenomenon has precipitated in American society, the impact of divorce upon the entire family unit, and the adjustments required for healthy family functioning. Also offered as MFT 5510.

CSL 5511 Marital Life-Cycle (3)

With the marital life-cycle as a structure, this course will examine the marital relationship as an interactive and changing system. Particular attention will be given to the predictable challenges presented to couples in the form of demands for adaptation, the identified characteristics of marital health, and various changes experienced in both the institution of marriage and spousal roles during the past few decades. Also offered as MFT 5511.

CSL 5512 The Child in the Family System (3)

Designed to review theories and research in child development by identifying normal and anticipated behavior from birth through adolescence within the family context. The ability to recognize what constitutes deviations from the anticipated behavior will also be identified with practical suggestions for intervention. Also offered as MFT 5512.

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY

MFT 5200 Systems Theory and Family Therapy (3)

Introduces the theory and basic underlying assumptions of a systems framework to marriage and family therapy. The emphasis is on identifying the characteristics of healthy family functioning and conceptualizing human problems as they are related to the functioning of systems. Also offered as CSL 5200.

MFT 5350 Marital Therapy (3)

An introduction to the understanding and practice of marital therapy. Students will focus on developing a set of universally accepted basic skills with special attention given to the early phases of treating dyadic problems. Additional attention will be given to recognizing common problem presentations and developing diagnostic and intervention skills based on various theoretical approaches. Also offered as CSL 5350.

MFT 5351 Family Therapy (3)

Introduces the understanding and practicing of family therapy. Focus will be on developing both diagnostic and intervention skills in regards to treating problems within the context of the family. Special attention will be given to differentiating between various approaches within the purview of family systems theory. Also offered as CSL 5351.

MFT 5355 Advanced Marital Therapy (3)

An advanced seminar in couple's therapy. The course will explore the roles of (1) family-of-origin influence and (2) emotion in intimate relationships and clinical practice with couples. Special attention is given to the development and integration of the clinical skills used in (1) transgenerational and (2) emotionally focused couple therapies. Also offered as CSL 5355.

MFT 5400 Marital Therapy: Crisis Situations and Sexuality (3)

Designed to give attention to the special problems presented by (1) crisis situations and (2) sexuality. Regarding crisis presentations, common marital presentations will be studied (abusive relationships, marital separation, infidelity, etc.) with attention given to both recognition and appropriate intervention strategies. Regarding sexuality, healthy and problematic areas of sexual functioning will be studied with special attention given to assessment and diagnostic skills for identifying sexual dysfunction and correspondingly appropriate treatment regimens. Also offered as CSL 5400.

MFT 5455 Practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy I (3)

Provides supervised experience in the practice of marriage and family therapy in an appropriate clinical setting (usually a mental health center or community agency). Activities will include face-to-face contact with individuals, couples, and families for the purpose of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Students will spend a minimum of 150 hours on site under appropriate supervision (practicum fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

MFT 5456 Practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy II (3)

To be taken in consecutive sequence with MFT 5455 "Practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy I" and preferably at the same site, the course provides a continued supervised experience in the practice of marriage and family therapy in an appropriate clinical setting (usually a mental health center or community agency). Activities will include face-to-face contact with individuals, couples, and families for the purpose of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Student will spend a minimum of 150 hours on site under appropriate supervision (practicum fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

MFT 5457 Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy I (3)

Provides supervised experience in the practice of marriage and family therapy in an appropriate clinical setting (usually a mental health center or community agency). Activities will include face-to-face contact with individuals, couples, and families for the purpose of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site under appropriate supervision of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact (internship fee). Under certain circumstances internship may be extended.*

MFT 5458 Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy II (3)

To be taken in consecutive sequence with MFT 5457 "Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy I" and preferably at the same site, the course provides a continued supervised experience in the practice of marriage and family therapy in an appropriate clinical setting (usually a mental health center or community agency). Activities will include face-to-face contact with individuals, couples, and families for the purpose of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Student will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site under appropriate supervision of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact. (internship fee). Under certain circumstances internship may be extended.*

MFT 5510 Divorce and Divorce Adjustment (3)

A study of the contemporary family through the avenue of the divorce experience. The primary concern will be an understanding of the cultural influences that fostered a rise in the divorce rate, the changes that this phenomenon has precipitated in American society, the impact of divorce upon the entire family unit, and the adjustments required for healthy family functioning. Also offered as CSL 5510.

MFT 5511 Marital Life-Cycle (3)

With the marital life-cycle as a structure, this course will examine the marital relationship as an interactive and changing system. Particular attention will be given to the predictable challenges presented to couples in the form of demands for adaptation, the identified characteristics of marital health, and various changes experienced in both the institution of marriage and spousal roles during the past few decades. Also offered as CSL 5511.

MFT 5512 The Child in the Family System (3)

Designed to review theories and research in child development by identifying normal and anticipated behavior from birth through adolescence within the family context. The ability to recognize what constitutes deviations from the anticipated behavior will also be identified with practical suggestions for intervention. Also offered as CSL 5512.

MFT 5530 Professional Seminar: Ethical Standards (1)

A professional seminar with emphasis upon an examination of both the ethical guidelines and the legal responsibilities and liabilities (family law) which are related to the practice of marriage and family therapy.

MFT 5531 Professional Seminar: Professional Identity (1)

A professional seminar with emphasis upon defining and establishing a professional identity as a marriage and family therapist. Focus will include appropriate credentials, licensure, and involvement with professional organizations as a means of both maintaining and fostering professional growth and development.

MFT 5532 Professional Seminar: Professional Context (1)

A professional seminar with emphasis upon developing a familiarization with clinical practice settings. The necessity of establishing and maintaining cooperative relationships with other professionals will be explored, whether these professionals are marriage and family therapists or from other helping professions.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 5100 Introduction to Psychological Research (3)

Designed to give an introduction to research strategies with an emphasis on counseling and psychological problems. Emphasis will be on the development of a proposal for a major research project or thesis. Also offered as CSL 5100.

PSY 5220 Lifespan Development (3)

Looks at the survey of research throughout the entire lifespan including findings in the areas of physical, emotional, cognitive, and interpersonal growth and development. Also offered as CSL 5220.

PSY 5230 Career Counseling: Theory and Practice (3)

An examination of the current trends in career development and life choices. The students will develop a knowledge base concerning career theories and techniques for exploring the interests, aptitudes, and values of clients in order to assist them in making reasoned career and lifestyle decisions. Also offered as CSL 5230

PSY 5231 Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3)

Integration and study of the traditional and currently developing theories of counseling and psychotherapy and their application. Also offered as CSL 5231.

PSY 5240 Advanced Abnormal Psychology (3)

Focuses on patterns of abnormal behavior including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, antisocial behavior, and mental retardation. These patterns of abnormal behavior are discussed and related to DSM-IV TR diagnosis. Also offered as CSL 5240.

PSY 5250 Counseling Diverse Populations (3)

An overview of counseling strategies useful with varied populations. Counseling skills helpful with clients of different racial, economic, religious, and sexual orientations will also be examined. Also offered as CSL 5250.

PSY 5330 Chemical Use and Abuse (3)

Includes topics on historical, medical, psychological, and family dynamics of the treatment process for chemical dependency. An understanding of the many classes of drugs and their effects on the dependent person will be developed. Also offered as CSL 5330.

PSY 5390 Effective Treatments in Therapy (3)

Provides an overview and discussion of the effective treatments of various psychological disorders. A focus will be placed on treatment planning and evaluating outcomes in therapy. Also offered as CSL 5390.

PSY 5420 Personality Theory (3)

The psychology of personality cannot be approached from a single theoretical orientation; rather one must discuss theories of personality. Thus, the aim of this course is to discuss some of the leading theories of personality held by those individuals who have pioneered the field. Also offered as CSL 5420.

PSY 5430 Group Therapy and Process (3)

Examines group techniques and application to counseling settings. Various ethnic and socioeconomic groups will be emphasized. Also offered as CSL 5430.

PSY 5441 Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)

An overview of test construction, selection, and application will be the focus of this course. Legal and ethical administration of tests for ability, intelligence, attitudes, values, and personality will also be examined. Experience in taking and administering sample instruments will be provided. Also offered as CSL 5441.

PSY 5442 Statistical Analysis / Research Design (3)

An introduction to the use of statistics in psychology with emphasis on application to solving research related problems and design of investigations related to areas of student and professional interest.

PSY 5443 Objective Personality Analysis (3)

Experiences will be provided in the area of objective personality analysis. Students will administer, score, and interpret the MMPI-2, CPI, MCMI-III, 16-PF, and other currently used instruments in the field. Prerequisite PSY 5441 Introduction to Psychological Testing.

PSY 5444 Individual Intelligence Assessment (3)

Experience will be provided in the areas of administering, scoring, and interpreting the Wechsler, Binet and Kaufman instruments. Prerequisite PSY 5441 Introduction to Psychological Testing.

PSY 5450 Practicum in Counseling I (3)

Provides practical supervised experience in beginning counseling skills. It includes the development of relationship building skills, fact-finding, and counseling experiences in a mental health setting. 150 hours. (practicum fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

PSY 5451 Practicum in Counseling II (3)

As a continuation of Practicum in Counseling I, the course provides practical supervised experience in a mental health or community agency. It includes the development of relationship building and exploratory (fact-finding) skills as well as skills in intervention and treatment planning. 150 hours. (practicum fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

PSY 5456 Practicum in Counseling Psychology I (3)

Provides practical supervised experience in beginning psychotherapy skills. It includes therapy, testing, consulting, and other site relevant activities pertaining to the field. The student must be supervised by a properly licensed supervisor. 150 hours. (practicum fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

PSY 5457 Practicum in Counseling Psychology II (3)

As a continuation of the Practicum in Counseling Psychology I, the course provides practical psychotherapy skills. It includes therapy, testing, consulting, and other site relevant activities pertaining to the field. The student must be supervised by a properly licensed supervisor. 150 hours. (practicum fee). Under certain circumstances practicum may be extended.*

PSY 5458 Internship in Counseling Psychology I (3)

Provides supervised experience in beginning psychotherapy skills. It includes therapy, testing, consulting, and other site relevant activities pertaining to the field. Students must be supervised by a properly licensed supervisor. Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact. (internship fee). Under certain circumstances internship may be extended.*

PSY 5459 Internship in Counseling Psychology II (3)

As a continuation of the Internship in Counseling Psychology I, the course provides practical psychotherapy skills. It includes therapy, testing, consulting, and other site relevant activities pertaining to the field. Students must be supervised by a properly licensed supervisor. Students will spend a minimum of 200 hours on site of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact. (internship fee). Under certain circumstances internship may be extended.*

PSY 5472 Professional Standards and Ethics (3)

Emphasizes the development, understanding, and application of ethical standards in the theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. The Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT), and the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct of the American Psychological Association (APA) will be studied along with other professional standards of practice and credentialing. Also offered as CSL 5472.

PSY 5480 Counseling Techniques and Interventions (3)

A study of counseling theories (classical and contemporary), techniques, philosophy, and history with emphasis on cognitive, affective, and behavioral interventions.

PSY 5482 Practicum: Techniques and Interventions I (3)

A study of counseling paradigms with a special emphasis on the beginning stage of therapy is the focus of this course. Counseling techniques and cognitive, affective, and behavioral interventions will be shared, evaluated, demonstrated, and practiced both in the classroom and in a practicum setting. Students will be expected to initiate a practicum experience that will continue into the next course, PSY/CSL 5483 Practicum: Techniques and Intervention II. All totaled the practicum will total 100 hours with 40 of the 100 hours being in direct client contact (group therapy, co-therapy, client intakes, individual therapy, etc.). Also offered as CSL 5482.

PSY 5483 Practicum: Techniques and Interventions II (3)

The purpose of this course is to prepare, equip, and direct the student in his/her practicum experience and assist in the internship placement process. This course will simulate the skills needed to have a successful practicum and internship experience. With emphasis on role-play and other practical activities, students will demonstrate entry level counseling skills as well as the operational skills required for functioning within an agency setting. As a course marking the consummation of academic and classroom training and the transition to actual practice, each student will demonstrate initial competency in a chosen counseling model consistent with the goals and purposes of this program. By the end of this course the student will have completed a 100 hour practicum of which 40 of the 100 hours will have been in direct client contact (group therapy, co-therapy, client intakes, individual therapy, etc.). Prerequisite PSY 5482. Also offered as CSL 5483.

PSY 5910 Advanced Seminar in Psychotherapy (3)

To insure preparation for student placement in a practicum setting. This course will simulate the practicum experience. The emphasis on role-play and other practical activities will allow students to demonstrate entry-level counseling skills as well as the operational skills required for functioning within an agency setting. As a course marking the consummation of academic and classroom training and the transition to actual practice, each student will demonstrate initial competency in a chosen counseling model consistent with the goals and purposes of this program. Prerequisite PSY 5480.

PSY 5920 Master’s Thesis (3)

The master's thesis should demonstrate a professional contribution to the practice of counseling psychology. Areas of research should be chosen that are compatible with chosen thesis advisor. There is a $55.00 per credit hour charge in addition to the regular tuition. Students sign up for one hour of thesis for three semesters. Those extending beyond three semesters are charged a THESIS EXTENSION FEE of $233.00 per semester.

* Students who do not complete their practicum within the semester will at the discretion of their advisor be allowed to continue into the next subsequent semester. The student will be required to meet all class assignments with the practicum students in the new practicum class. A new practicum supervisor may be assigned for this extension. A PRACTICUM EXTENSION FEE of $250 will be charged.

PH.D. CLINICAL COUNSELING: TEACHING AND SUPERVISION

Doctoral Program Design

The Ph.D. is a 66 credit hour doctoral program designed for the working practitioner. The program extends for nine semesters with the student registering for three courses or nine hours for six semesters and four hours for three semesters in the last year of the program. At this rate the student can complete the degree in three years. The program is a rigorous, standardized curriculum that offers cognates in counseling or marriage and family therapy. Courses are offered two days a week (Tuesday and Thursday). The program also offers a focus on counselor education and supervision.

Statement of Purpose

The Ph.D. is an advanced professional degree designed for several groups: a) those who wish to enhance their skills as a therapist, b) those who wish to further their career within the mental health delivery system, c) those who wish to take a more active role in supervision and the development of other therapists, and d) those who wish to expand their professional options to include teaching in undergraduate and graduate training programs. The strong theme of the program is to develop clinicians who will themselves positively enhance the professional mental health community.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate from the Ph.D. degree should be able to:

  1. Understand and practice the art of therapy at a more proficient and advanced level;
  2. Teach therapy and human relations coursework at a higher education level (community colleges, four-year colleges/universities, graduate training programs);
  3. Supervise the development of less experienced therapists;
  4. Offer administrative leadership within agencies and organizations;
  5. Procure licensure in a desired area of clinical specialization (as a Licensed Professional Counselor or Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist);
  6. Conduct independent research at an advanced level.

Selection Process and Admissions

The Ph.D. program is for individuals holding a master's degree in psychology, counseling, marriage and family therapy, or a similar field. To begin the process of admission, the student will be required to submit:

  1. Application with $50.00 non-refundable fee.
  2. Official transcript of master's degree from a regionally accredited college/university with at least a 3.25 GPA (on a scale of 4.0) and undergraduate degree posted.
  3. Three completed Applicant Recommendation Forms (one from a religious leader/pastor and two from professors, employers or supervisors).
  4. A 400-word letter of intent specifying the applicant's purpose and goals for entering the Ph.D. program.
  5. Professional vita.
  6. TOEFL Score: International Students/Students who speak English as Second language must submit scores from the TOEFL with a minimum score of 600 on paper version of test or 250 on computer version of test.

DEADLINE FOR COMPLETED APPLICATION FILE IS MARCH 15

Admission is based on the evaluation of the following components:

  1. GRE Test Score (verbal, quantitative and analytical writing sections).
  2. Grade point average (GPA) from previous college experiences.
  3. Recommendation Forms (These should attest to potential ability for success in doctoral studies).
  4. Interview- An individual and group interview will be conducted by the Admissions Committee. This will be an opportunity to assess personal goals, oral communication skills, and ability to interact with other professionals.

Admissions Committee

The purpose of the Admissions Committee is to review the data submitted for entry into the doctoral program. Because selection is based on a composite evaluation, the committee will determine whether the applicant is accepted or denied.

The Admissions Committee decision for acceptance or denial to the program is final and is not subject to appeal. The Admissions Committee is comprised of selected graduate psychology faculty.

General Academic Policies

Prerequisite Courses

A course comparable to Advanced Abnormal (one that deals with psychopathology from a diagnostic perspective and includes DSM nomenclature) and Cultural Diversity are a prerequisite to doctoral training. Students who have not taken such courses will be required to do so in addition to doctoral requirements.

Transfer Credit

Students may transfer a maximum of nine (9) hours of post degreed academic work at the doctoral level through a regionally accredited university or training facility/institute. Acceptance of transfer credit will be based on the following criteria:

  1. The course was completed within the last five years (this is more stringent than the master's program which is within the last ten years).
  2. The course is relevant to the degree program.
  3. A minimum grade of B was earned.

Additional General Academic Policies

  1. Doctoral students are required to remain in continual registration until the program has been completed. In extreme cases a student may apply in writing for a Leave of Absence. Normally a Leave of Absence will be a period no longer than one year. A Leave of Absence fee will be assessed for each semester in which the student is not taking course work or dissertation hours.
  2. All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years of being admitted to the program.

Academic Advisor-Doctoral

Each doctoral student is assigned an academic advisor. All academic advisors are full-time faculty members in the graduate psychology program. The student works directly with the advisor at all times.

Grading System-Doctoral Program

The grading system for doctoral studies includes the letter grades A, B, C, D, and F for all courses except dissertation. The grades of S, U, or I will be assigned to dissertation. Courses with grades of C-, D, F, or U must be retaken. If the student is maintaining a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, two course grades of C+ or C will be allowed for the degree purpose.

Attendance Policy

An unexcused absence from a six-session course or two unexcused absences from a twelve-session course results in a penalty of one letter grade; two absences from a six-session course or four absences from a twelve-session course result in disenrollment from the course. When absent the student is responsible for notifying the instructor and making up the work according to the instructor's directions. An absence form must be submitted in writing to the director of the Graduate Psychology Program, who will decide if the absence is unexcused or excused. The form is required for any absence.

Doctoral Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination evaluates the student's ability to integrate knowledge of counseling or marriage and family therapy, display critical and independent thinking and research skills, and demonstrate mastery of the field (teaching and supervision). The results of the examination provide evidence of independent thinking, appropriate organization, writing competency, critical analysis, and accuracy of documentation. The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to encourage students who are nearing graduation to engage in a systematic review of their coursework. The exam also provides faculty with one form of evidence to make determinations regarding the student's readiness for graduation.

The comprehensive exam will be in two parts: written and oral. Only those students in the last semester of their coursework will be allowed to attempt the comprehensive exam. The written portion of the exam will be composed of four questions and will be completed in two three-hour segments of time (one hour and thirty minutes per question). The first testing period will include a Research/Statistics question and a Supervision Models and Teaching Strategies question. The second testing period will include a Theories question (comparing or contrasting various therapeutic models) and a Counseling or Marriage and Family Practics question (counseling case scenario) based on the Psychological Testing and Psychopharmacological Issues courses for the counseling cognate or the Preventative Approaches and Affective Therapy courses for the marriage and family cognate. All questions will potentially cover some aspects from the Ethics course and the Integration course. Courses in process during the summer semester in which the comprehensive exam is offered will not be covered on the examination. The comprehensive exam will be offered every summer semester and on a case by case basis during the fall or spring semesters. The oral exam will generally follow within two weeks of the written examination and will provide the student an opportunity to explain, defend and elaborate on his/her written answers in response to a committee of faculty members from the doctoral program.

Three possible grades may be assigned to the written and oral examination: pass with distinction, pass, or fail. Students who do not successfully complete the comprehensive exam will have a remediation plan developed and enacted before scheduling a second attempt. In some cases the retake may include all four questions; in other cases the retake may be limited to select questions. If the second attempt is failed, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Doctoral Internship

The doctoral internship is designed to complement the coursework of the Ph.D. program. Students are required to complete six academic hours of internship. The doctoral internship is to be completed in three semesters (two academic hours each semester). There is a minimum requirement of 600 hours of internship (200 hours each semester completed over three semesters). Of the 600 hours of internship, 240 hours must be direct service hours.

Direct service hours involve any face-to-face contact with a client or clients that involve counseling individuals, couples, families, or groups. It also includes reviewing a treatment plan with a client or administering a test/assessment to a client. One must be providing services directly to the client to be considered direct service hours. Direct service may also involve teaching or supervision experiences.

Indirect service hours involve writing case notes, reading case records, participating in a client case/team conference, reading articles or listening to CDs/DVDs related to the client population, attending a seminar or workshop, writing a report based on a test or assessment of a client, staff, or clinical meetings and supervision hours. Grading, keeping notes, etc. count towards indirect service hours for teaching or supervision.

The doctoral internship may be completed at agencies and organizations where students are employed and receive remuneration for their labor. This also includes those students who are already licensed and working in a private practice. Students who are not licensed and/or practicing under a temporary license as they pursue the hours of experience required by the state must be supervised (ideally, weekly supervision) by a properly licensed or credentialed supervisor depending upon the student's licensure interest. This is in addition to a Trevecca supervisor who will be assigned to each internship student. The "on-site" supervisor provides case supervision. The Trevecca supervisor provides skill supervision. Students who are already licensed (regardless of the number of years of licensure) are also required to secure an "on-site" supervisor for case supervision. This supervision should involve at a minimum two hours of supervision per month. At least one of the three semesters of internship must be in counseling. Academic advisors will determine the organization of a student's internship.

Dissertation

Each student will write and defend a dissertation before his/her doctoral committee and any faculty of the School of Arts and Sciences who choose to attend. The doctoral committee will consist of three members: The first of these will be the dissertation chair. Following the standards and procedures of the doctoral program, the dissertation chair will supervise the dissertation, chair the dissertation defense, and remain in consultation with the Director of Graduate Research. The other committee members are considered the second reader and the third reader. One of the committee members may be from an institution other than Trevecca Nazarene University but must hold a doctoral level degree. It is the student's responsibility to secure the committee members. Dissertation will occur over 3 semesters (two credit hours each semester).

The dissertation must contribute new knowledge or a reinterpretation of existing knowledge to the area being investigated. The dissertation must demonstrate high standards of scholarship and the ability to engage in independent research resulting in a substantial contribution to knowledge or practice in the field.

The dissertation process begins with an approved proposal. The proposal must be approved by the student's dissertation chair, the student's dissertation committee members, and the director of graduate research.

The student should be guided by the following principles:

  1. The dissertation should reflect an advanced understanding of the disciplines of counseling or marriage and family therapy.
  2. The dissertation must engage its topic critically and constructively.
  3. The dissertation may engage a problem and reevaluate prior approaches and propose a new approach.
  4. The dissertation should illustrate both creativity and originality.
  5. Upon successful defense of the dissertation, three professionally bound copies must be furnished to the Office of Graduate Psychology. The student may also request his or her own bound copy or copies as well. The student will procure appropriate photocopies of each bound document prior to professional binding. All dissertations must then be published through UMI.

After the six hours of dissertation have been completed, the student must pay a dissertation extension fee equal to one hour of course credit each semester until the dissertation has been defended and the final document has been sent to the bindery.

A dissertation abstract must be included with the bound copy.

The dissertation must be defended before the student's committee and anyone else who chooses to attend the defense. The date and time should be communicated to the University two weeks prior to the actual defense.

If the student fails the defense, a second opportunity will be given to the student. A second failure will result in the denial of the degree to the student.

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation from the doctoral program, students must:

  1. Submit a graduation application and fee by the required date.
  2. Complete all requirements of the curricula.
  3. Attain a grade point average of 3.0. Complete the required number of semester hours of credit with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0. Students earning a C- or below on any course will be required to repeat that particular course.
  4. Make no more than two C+ or C grades in the program.
  5. Repeat courses with grades of C-, D, F or U.
  6. Pass the Comprehensive Doctoral Examination.
  7. Successfully defend the dissertation.
  8. Once the student has successfully defended the dissertation he/she will:
    1. obtain APA editing of the final dissertation document
    2. obtain three photocopies of the dissertation document
    3. obtain professional binding for three copies, and
    4. submit the three bound dissertation documents to the graduate psychology office (The above steps are described in detail in the dissertation handbook)
  9. Make up dissertation hours with a grade of "I."
  10. Satisfy all financial obligations to the University.

Probation/Suspension Policy

Any student making a grade of C- in any course will be automatically placed on academic probation. He or she may continue in the program but must repeat that course with a later group.

Each student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) each semester to remain in academic "good standing." If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, after the completion of nine semester hours, the student will be placed on academic probation for the following semester. Upon regaining the required cumulative average (3.0), the student will again be in good standing; however, if the student does not increase the cumulative average to 3.0 during the probationary semester, he or she will be placed on academic suspension for the subsequent semester and may reapply to the Admissions Committee for reinstatement after a three month waiting period. The student will be assigned to a later group if reinstated by the Admission Committee.

Any student making a grade of D+ or below in any course will be automatically placed on academic suspension. After a three month waiting period, the student may petition to return to the program. If reinstated by the Admission Committee, the student may repeat the course with a later group and (if achieving a grade of C or better) may continue in the program sequences with that later group.

Any student receiving more than one grade of D+ or below will be permanently dismissed from the program.

Program of Study

The Ph.D. program will encompass a 66-hour curriculum as listed below:

I. Core Courses

33 hours

CSL 7002

Ethical Standards and Legal Issues in the Counseling Profession

3

CSL 7003

Psychodynamics Psychotherapies

3

CSL 7004

Cognitive Behavioral Therapies

3

CSL 7005

Postmodern Psychotherapies

3

CSL 7001

Advanced Group Psychotherapy (Practicum)

3

CSL 7010

Issues of Integration: Christian Ideology in a Professional World

3

CSL 7007

Treating Addictions: A Family Dynamics Approach

3

CSL 7008

Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Disorders

3

CSL 7009

Advanced Multicultural Counseling

3

CSL 7104

Specialized Systemic Family Therapy (Practicum)

3

CSL 7151

Psychological Testing for Counselors

3

II. Teaching and Supervision

6 hours

CSL 7201

Supervision Models

3

CSL 7251

Technology and Teaching Strategies in Counselor Education

3

III. Cognates

6 hours

MFT cognate

 

CSL 7101

Preventative Approaches: Premarital Therapy and Enrichment Activities

3

CSL 7102

Theories of Affect Regulations and Attachment

3

or

 

Counseling cognate

 

CSL 7152

Professional Challenges for Counselors

3

CSL 7153

Psychopharmacological Issues in Counseling Setting

3

IV. Internship in Therapy

6 hours

CSL 7360

Doctoral Internship I

2

CSL 7361

Doctoral Internship II

2

CSL 7362

Doctoral Internship III

2

V. Research/Dissertation

15 hours

CSL 7301

Doctoral Research Methodology

3

CSL 7300

Doctoral Proposal Development

3

CSL 7302

Statistical Analysis in Clinical Practice

3

CSL 7303

Dissertation Research

6

DOCTORAL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CSL 7001 Advanced Group Psychotherapy (3)

Major approaches to group counseling and psychotherapy will be covered with a focus on critical evaluation. The process of group counseling and psychotherapy will be analyzed as well as research in the area. Role-playing and simulations of group therapy situations for the purpose of training will be offered. This course will serve as a Practicum (50 hours indirect/ 20 hours direct client contact). Also offered as PSY 7001.

CSL 7002 Ethical Standards and Legal Issues in the Counseling Profession (3)

Emphasizes the development, understanding, and application of ethical standards in the theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. Of special attention will be legal issues arising from the practice of professional therapy. Attention will be given to understanding and differentiating between the specific articles of professional conduct established by the American Psychological Association, American Counseling Association, and the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Also offered as PSY 7002.

CSL 7003 Psychodynamic Psychotherapies (3)

Prepares students to conduct time limited psychodynamic psychotherapy drawing upon psychoanalytic clinical theory. Topics covered include: psychodynamic assumptions about the mechanisms of change in treatment, the role of the unconscious and mechanisms of change in treatment, the role of the unconscious and mechanisms of defense as well as transference and counter-transference. Also offered as PSY 7003.

CSL 7004 Cognitive Behavioral Therapies (3)

Prepares students to conduct psychotherapy from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. Theoretical underpinnings of cognitive-behavioral therapy are covered prior to focusing on the case conceptualization and intervention techniques employed by practitioners of the model. Students will become familiar with a variety of behavioral and cognitive interventions designed to change affective states, thought patterns, and problematic behaviors. Also offered as PSY 7004.

CSL 7005 Postmodern Psychotherapies (3)

Provides a study of postmodern therapies including solution-focused brief therapy, narrative therapy, and social constructionism. New methods of therapy delivery involve efforts in which therapists come from a "not knowing" position and allow themselves to enter the dialogue in a more creative way. Also offered as PSY 7005.

CSL 7007 Treating Addictions: A Family Dynamics Approach (3)

Surveys the literature on substance abuse, chemical dependency, and other addictive behaviors. Emphasis is placed on the assessment and treatment of persons with addictive behaviors especially from a family systems perspective. Also offered as PSY 7007.

CSL 7008 Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Disorders (3)

Reviews theories of sexual development and the diagnosis and treatment of sexual disorders along with the psychosocial and cultural variables associated with these issues. Also offered as PSY 7008.

CSL 7009 Advanced Multicultural Counseling (3)

An advanced overview of counseling strategies and advocacy planning useful with varied populations, including counseling skills helpful with clients with different racial, economic, religious, and sexual orientations. An emphasis will be placed upon specific multicultural counseling skills needed in doctoral-level leadership positions.

CSL 7010 Issues of Integration: Christian Ideology in a Professional World (3)

Provides an overview of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical issues involved in relating one's Christian worldview to psychology, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. Emphasis will be placed on the various philosophical and practical ways practitioners resolve the tensions of faith and practice from a Christian perspective. Practical implications for conducting psychotherapy with people who have spiritual and religious concerns will be explored. Also offered as PSY 7010.

CSL 7101 Preventative Approaches: Premarital Therapy and Enrichment Activities (3)

Focuses on preventative modes of influencing significant relationships. As such, attention will be given to pre and post relationships by developing and implementing models for soundly and thoroughly working with relationships prior to marriage as well as post-marital enrichment programs for those couples who are already married.

CSL 7102 Theories of Affect Regulation and Attachment (Affective Therapy) (3)

Investigates the theories and research of affect regulation and attachment from a range of disciplines and how this material might be integrated into the practice of individual, marital and family treatment/intervention. Special attention will be given to the more popular models, such as EFT or suitable alternatives. Also offered as PSY 7102.

CSL 7104 Specialized Systemic Family Therapy (3)

Provides an advanced overview of systemic theory with a specific focus upon application with families. The students' learning will be enhanced with a specialized focus upon diverse groups, ethical dilemmas, and specialized family case presentations. Theoretical emphasis will be placed upon general systems theory including transgenerational, structural/strategic, and collaborative theories. The students will participate in a practicum experience in this course with direct face-to-face client contact. This course will serve as a Practicum (50 hours indirect/20 hours direct client contact).

CSL 7151 Psychological Testing for Counselors (3)

Studies the administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of the most common assessment instruments used by professional counselors. The focus will be on assessment instruments such as the MBTI, FIRO-B, Beck Scales, SASSI-3, etc. Review of ethical principles and practice issues relevant to testing will be covered. Also offered as PSY 7151.

CSL 7152 Professional Challenges for Counselors (3)

Focuses on practical issues that face practitioners in the 21st century: starting a practice, guidelines and procedures for referral and inter-professional collaboration, legal, ethical, and professional issues involved in working in a multidisciplinary managed care context, managing time, keeping abreast with the literature, and avoiding burnout. Also offered as PSY 7152.

CSL 7153 Psychopharmacological Issues in Counseling Settings (3)

Provides a general overview of current research on the use and effectiveness of psychotropic medication in the treatment of psychological disorders as well as ethical and professional implications. Also offered as PSY 7153.

CSL 7201 Supervision Models (3)

Designed to give students training and practice in supervisory and consultant roles. Various supervision models will be evaluated.

CSL 7251 Technology and Teaching Strategies in Counselor Education (3)

Provides an overview of counselor education including the development of professional identity. Specifically, this course focuses upon effective teaching approaches, course delivery systems (technology), as well as methods of classroom management, testing, and lecture development. This course provides the information, theory, and training necessary to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in counselor education.

CSL 7300 Doctoral Proposal Development (3)

Focuses on the development and facilitation of the initial stages of the dissertation process. However, a focus will be maintained throughout this course on the entire dissertation project. Specific emphasis will be placed on the logistics of the dissertation project, including formulating a topic, the introduction, the review of literature, and methodology including appropriate statistical analysis, as well as securing a dissertation chair and committee, and preparation of the formal proposal defense. The students will be introduced to a variety of dissertation options as well as strategies for successful completion. The students will complete a draft of the first chapters of their dissertation project. Also offered as PSY 7300.

CSL 7301 Doctoral Research Methodology (3)

Focuses on the development and facilitation of the dissertation process. Stress will be placed on the logistics of the dissertation project, including formulating a topic, the literature review, securing a dissertation chair and committee, and preparation of the proposal. Also offered as PSY 7301.

CSL 7302 Statistical Analysis in Clinical Practice (3)

An introduction to the use of statistics in psychology with emphasis on application to solving research related problems and design of investigations related to areas of student and professional interest. Also offered as PSY 7302.

CSL 7303 Dissertation Research (6) - three semesters of two hours each

Planning and implementation of a doctoral dissertation including literature review, problem definition, hypothesis formation, design, implementation of research project, data analysis, and report writing. The final step requires the student to successfully defend the dissertation.

CSL 7360 Doctoral Internship I (2)

Provides practical experience and supervision in areas consistent with academic and professional goals of the doctoral student working toward a professional counselor identity. In addition, the internship can provide direct experience in counselor education and supervision. Specifically, the internship experience provides for advanced experience with delivery of counseling services, supervision of counselors-in-training, counselor education, or consultation, depending on licensure status and internship site determination. Each semester of internship consists of a minimum of 200 hours onsite of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact.

CSL 7361 Doctoral Internship II (2)

Provides practical experience and supervision in areas consistent with academic and professional goals of the doctoral student working toward a professional counselor identity. In addition, the internship can provide direct experience in counselor education and supervision. Specifically, the internship experience provides for advanced experience with delivery of counseling services, supervision of counselors-in-training, counselor education, or consultation, depending on licensure status and internship site determination. Each semester of internship consists of a minimum of 200 hours onsite of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact.

CSL 7362 Doctoral Internship III (2)

Provides practical experience and supervision in areas consistent with academic and professional goals of the doctoral student working toward a professional counselor identity. In addition, the internship can provide direct experience in counselor education and supervision. Specifically, the internship experience provides for advanced experience with delivery of counseling services, supervision of counselors-in-training, counselor education, or consultation, depending on licensure status and internship site determination. Each semester of internship consists of a minimum of 200 hours onsite of which 80 of the 200 hours must be in direct client contact.

PSY 7001 Advanced Group Psychotherapy (3)

Major approaches to group counseling and psychotherapy will be covered with a focus on critical evaluation. The process of group counseling and psychotherapy will be analyzed as well as research in the area. Role-playing and simulations of group therapy situations for the purpose of training will be offered. This course will serve as a Practicum (50 hours indirect/ 20 hours direct client contact). Also offered as CSL 7001.

PSY 7002 Ethical Standards and Legal Issues in the Counseling Profession (3)

Emphasizes the development, understanding, and application of ethical standards in the theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy. Of special attention will be legal issues arising from the practice of professional therapy. Attention will be given to understanding and differentiating between the specific articles of professional conduct established by the American Psychological Association, American Counseling Association, and the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Also offered as CSL 7002.

PSY 7003 Psychodynamic Psychotherapies (3)

Prepares students to conduct time limited psychodynamic psychotherapy drawing upon psychoanalytic clinical theory. Topics covered include: psychodynamic assumptions about the mechanisms of change in treatment, the role of the unconscious and mechanisms of change in treatment, the role of the unconscious and mechanisms of defense as well as transference and counter-transference. Also offered as CSL 7003.

PSY 7004 Cognitive Behavioral Therapies (3)

Prepares students to conduct psychotherapy from a cognitive-behavioral perspective. Theoretical underpinnings of cognitive-behavioral therapy are covered prior to focusing on the case conceptualization and intervention techniques employed by practitioners of the model. Students will become familiar with a variety of behavioral and cognitive interventions designed to change affective states, thought patterns, and problematic behaviors. Also offered as CSL 7004.

PSY 7005 Postmodern Psychotherapies (3)

Provides a study of postmodern therapies including solution-focused brief therapy, narrative therapy, and social constructionism. New methods of therapy delivery involve efforts in which therapists come from a "not knowing" position and allow themselves to enter the dialogue in a more creative way. Also offered as CSL 7005.

PSY 7007 Treating Addictions: A Family Dynamics Approach (3)

Surveys the literature on substance abuse, chemical dependency, and other addictive behaviors. Emphasis is placed on the assessment and treatment of persons with addictive behaviors especially from a family systems perspective. Also offered as CSL 7007.

PSY 7008 Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Disorders (3)

Reviews theories of sexual development and the diagnosis and treatment of sexual disorders along with the psychosocial and cultural variables associated with these issues. Also offered as CSL 7008.

PSY 7010 Issues of Integration: Christian Ideology in a Professional World (3)

Provides an overview of the theoretical, conceptual, and practical issues involved in relating one's Christian worldview to psychology, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. Emphasis will be placed on the various philosophical and practical ways practitioners resolve the tensions of faith and practice from a Christian perspective. Practical implications for conducting psychotherapy with people who have spiritual and religious concerns will be explored. Also offered as CSL 7010.

PSY 7102 Theories of Affect Regulation and Attachment (Affective Therapy) (3)

Investigates the theories and research of affect regulation and attachment from a range of disciplines and how this material might be integrated into the practice of individual, marital and family treatment/intervention. Special attention will be given to the more popular models, like EFT or suitable alternatives. Also offered as CSL 7102.

PSY 7103 Transgenerational and Specialized Family Therapy (3)

Investigates the theory, research, and practice of transgenerational and specialized family therapies. Readings will include a wide range of original works of the major theorists as well as current utilizations for the purpose of marriage and family intervention.

PSY 7151 Psychological Testing for Counselors (3)

Studies the administration, scoring, interpretation, and reporting of the most common assessment instruments used by professional counselors. The focus will be on assessment instruments such as the MBTI, FIRO-B, Beck Scales, SASSI-3, etc. Review of ethical principles and practice issues relevant to testing will be covered. Also offered as CSL 7151.

PSY 7152 Professional Challenges for Counselors (3)

Focuses on practical issues that face practitioners in the 21st century: starting a practice, guidelines and procedures for referral and inter-professional collaboration, legal, ethical, and professional issues involved in working in a multidisciplinary managed care context, managing time, keeping abreast with the literature and avoiding burnout. Also offered as CSL 7152.

PSY 7153 Psychopharmacological Issues in Counseling Settings (3)

Provide a general overview of current research on the use and effectiveness of psychotropic medication in the treatment of psychological disorders as well as ethical and professional implications. Also offered as CSL 7153.

PSY 7202 Supervision Group I (3)

Students in the doctoral program are responsible for supervising the professional activities of the less advanced students in the master's practicum. Focus will be on supervisee development and execution of basic skills in the counseling process.

PSY 7203 Supervision Group II (3)

Students in the doctoral program are responsible for supervising the professional activities of the less advanced students in the master's practicum. Focus will be on supervisee professional and personal development - personal growth model as the therapist explores the use-of-self in his/her therapy.

PSY 7252 Supervised Hours of Higher Education Teaching I (3)

Provides experience in teaching in a higher education setting. The student will provide assistance to an assigned faculty member in all aspects of course instruction, including lesson plans, course delivery systems, the provisions of class lectures, and the design and implementation of all student evaluations and tests.

PSY 7253 Supervised Hours of Higher Education Teaching II (3)

Provides experience in teaching in a higher education setting. The student will provide assistance to an assigned faculty member in all aspects of course instruction, including lesson plans, course delivery systems, the provisions of class lectures, and the design and implementation of all student evaluations and tests.

PSY 7300 Doctoral Proposal Development (3)

Focuses on the development and facilitation of the initial stages of the dissertation process. However, a focus will be maintained throughout this course on the entire dissertation project. Specific emphasis will be placed on the logistics of the dissertation project, including formulating a topic, the introduction, the review of literature, and methodology including appropriate statistical analysis, as well as securing a dissertation chair and committee, and preparation of the formal proposal defense. The students will be introduced to a variety of dissertation options as well as strategies for successful completion. The students will complete a draft of the first chapters of their dissertation project. Also offered as CSL 7300.

PSY 7301 Doctoral Research Methodology (3)

Focuses on the development and facilitation of the dissertation process. Stress will be placed on the logistics of the dissertation project, including formulating a topic, the literature review, securing a dissertation chair and committee, and preparation of the proposal. Also offered as CSL 7301.

PSY 7302 Statistical Analysis in Clinical Practice (3)

An introduction to the use of statistics in psychology with emphasis on application to solving research related problems and design of investigations related to areas of student and professional interest. Also offered as CSL 7302.

PSY 7303 Dissertation Research (6) - three semesters of two hours each

Planning and implementation of a doctoral dissertation including literature review, problem definition, hypothesis formation, design, implementation of research project, data analysis, and report writing. The final step requires the student to successfully defend the dissertation.

PSY 7351 Doctoral Practicum I (6)

Provides practical supervised experience in advanced psychotherapy skills. It includes therapy, testing consultation, and other site relevant activities pertaining to the field. The practicum experience will be in an appropriate clinical setting, and students must be supervised by a properly licensed or credentialed supervisor depending upon student's licensure interests. Site and supervisor approval must be attained through the doctoral program prior to commencing the practicum placement.

PSY 7352 Doctoral Practicum II (3)

As a continuation of the Doctoral Practicum I, this course provides practical supervised experience in advanced psychotherapy skills. It includes therapy, testing consultation, and other site relevant activities pertaining to the field. The practicum experience will be in an appropriate clinical setting, and students must be supervised by a properly licensed or credentialed supervisor depending upon student's licensure interests. Site and supervisor approval must be attained through the doctoral program prior to commencing the practicum placement.

FACULTY

JAMES E. AGEE, III
B.B.A., Eastern Nazarene College, 1994; Ph.D., University of Albany, 2000.

MICHAEL CHRISTIAN
B.A., Union University, 1978; M.Div., The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2001; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2004; Ph.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2011.

BRYCE E. FOX
B.A., Olivet Nazarene University, 1986; M.A., Asbury Theological Seminary, 1995; Ph.D., Indiana University, 2001.

DONALD R. HARVEY
B.A., Bethany Nazarene College, 1970; M.A., University of Alabama, 1975; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1983.

DON KINTNER
B.S., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1975; M.S., Tennessee State University, 1985; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1998.

SUSAN LAHEY
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 2002; M.M.F.T., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2004; Ph.D., Regent University, 2008.

TERRY T. PRUITT
B.A., David Lipscomb College, 1968; M.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1974; Ed.D., Vanderbilt University, 1984.

JAMES SCHUT
B.A., Hope College, 1992; M.S., Vanderbilt University, 1996; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2000.

STEVE STRIDE
B.A., California State University, 1995; M.A., Azusa Pacific University, 1997; Ph.D., Alliant International University, 2003.

PETER F. WILSON
B.A., Free Will Baptist Bible College, 1973; M.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1976; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1992.

Part-time Faculty

DEBORAH BARUZZINI
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1996; M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University, 1998; Ed.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2002.

DAVID DODD
B.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1980; M.A, University of Mississippi 1985; Ph.D., University of North Texas, 1990.

AMANDA GRIEME
B.A., Greenville College, 2002; M.M.F.T., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2004; Ph.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2011.

SCOTT ERICSON
B.S., Grace College, 1983; M.A., Grace Theological Seminary, 1987; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1995.

BROOKE FOXWORTHY
B.S., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1995; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1999; Ph.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2011.

ALAN GODWIN
B.S., Mississippi State University, 1974; M.A., Dallas Theological Seminary, 1985; Psy.D., Western Seminary, 1989.

KENT HUGHES
B.S., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1985; M.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1988; Psy.D., George Fox College, 1993.

KRISTI MARSHALL
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1999; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2004; Ph.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2011.

BRUCE A. McCURDY
B.A., Tennessee Temple University, 1978; M.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1990; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1995.

DENISE REDING-JONES
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2003; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005; Ph.D., Tennessee State University, 2010.

DOUGLAS E. ROSENAU
B.A., Bob Jones University, 1968; M.A., Bob Jones University, 1969; Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary, 1973; M.S. Ed., Northern Illinois University, 1977; Ed.D., Northern Illinois University, 1979.

CHARLES B. SELF
B.B.A., Baylor University, 1972; M.B.A., Baylor University, 1974; M.R.E., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, 1980; Ed.D., New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary, 1984.

LUCIANA C. SILVA
B.A., University of Georgia, 2004; B.S., University of Georgia, 2004; M.S., University of Georgia, 2007; Ph.D., University of Georgia, 2009.

JOYCE SLOAN
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1998; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2003; Ph.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2011.

DEBORAH TYSON
B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University, 1987; M.A., Fuller Seminary, 1993; Ph.D., Fuller School of Psychology, 1994.

MARY ELIZABETH WALKER
B.S., Union University, 1978; M.A., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1998; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1998; Ph.D., Tennessee State University, 2009.