Graduate Education Program

Master of Arts in Teaching K-6

Master of Arts in Teaching 7-12

Master of Arts in Education: Teaching

Master of Education: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction K-12

Master of Education: Instructional Technology PreK-12

Master of Education: Educational Leadership K-12

Master of Education: English Language Learners PreK-12

Master of Education: Reading, PreK-12

Master of Library and Information Science K-12

Master of Education: Teacher Leader PreK-12

Master of Education: Modified Special Education K-12

Master of Education: Visual Impairments Special Education

Doctor of Education: Leadership and Professional Practice

School of Education

Mackey Building (Corner of Lester and Hart)

615-248-1201 or 1-800-284-1594

Fax 615-248-1597

The School of Education

It is the mission of the School of Education to model competence, character, and compassion so that our students emulate and embrace these qualities in service and leadership.

Programs

Trevecca Nazarene University offers the following graduate degrees in the School of Education:

Master of Arts in Teaching K-6

Master of Arts in Teaching 7-12

Master of Arts in Education: Teaching

Master of Education: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction K-12

Master of Education: Instructional Technology PreK-12**

Master of Education: Educational Leadership K-12

Non-degree – Licensure in Educational Leadership also available

Master of Education: English Language Learners PreK-12

Master of Education: Reading PreK-12**

Master of Library and Information Science K-12

Non-degree – Licensure in Library and Information Science also available

Master of Education: Teacher Leader PreK-12

Master of Education: Modified Special Education K-12**

Master of Education: Visual Impairments Special Education

Doctorate of Education: Leadership and Professional Practice

*Changes in programs made after catalog publication will be identified on the School of Education Web pages.

**Approved programs that are not currently offered.

The School of Education also provides professional and personal development for educators and administrators. These courses for license renewal, plus 30, and additional learning are available for both undergraduate and graduate credit.

Conceptual Framework of the School of Education

Being, Knowing, and Doing – Educators: Shaping the Future. This underlying structure of the conceptual framework for the School of Education informs and frames the entire unit.

Knowing

Understands Content

Understands Intellectual, Social and Personal Development

Understands Diversity

Doing

Designs Instructional Strategies

Manages and Motivates

Communicates and Collaborates

Plans and Integrates

Evaluates

Being

Reflects on Practice

Participates in the Professional Community

Pursues Spiritual Development

Inherent in Trevecca's heritage, mission, and program is the assumption that because of who we are (Being), we seek to learn (Knowing), and to teach (Doing).

The School of Education, administered by the dean of the School of Education, offers undergraduate degrees, post-baccalaureate programs, master's degrees that lead to licensure, master's degrees for which the state does not offer licensure, and one doctoral degree that is non-licensure and multi-disciplinary within professional studies area.

Students in the master's level programs begin and continue as a cohort. Courses are offered the same at each location. On/off campus programs use the same textbooks, syllabi and course evaluations. The majority of off-campus courses are taught by full-time faculty. Students in the Ed.D. Program are in cohort groups for the three-year duration of the program.

The University is not responsible for any changes or delays in graduation for students who change groups or begin late. The University may combine groups as needed.

Purpose, Objectives, and Student Learning Outcomes of the Graduate Programs

The purpose of the graduate programs is to provide advanced study beyond the Baccalaureate degree.

Specific objectives are as follows:

Specific student learning outcomes are as follows: (adapted from INTASC, ISLE, and NBTS)

Knowing:

Doing:

Being:

Program Policies for Master's Degrees

Admissions

Two classifications of graduate students are recognized:

  1. Degree-seeking graduate students are those accepted into a specific graduate program.
  2. The non-degree seeking option serves students who do not wish to pursue a graduate degree at Trevecca, as well as those who may wish to begin graduate study before being admitted to a degree program. (No more than 9 semester hours earned as a non-degree graduate student may be applied toward a degree. Only grades A or B are acceptable.)

General requirements for admission to master of education degree programs are required of all applicants. These requirements are:

Additional requirements may be identified in the program specific sections of this catalog supplement or in assessment system information provided when beginning the program.

The number of transfer credits that will be accepted is in the Admission section in the general section of this catalog.

Restrictive admission to master's level courses may be considered for students who do not have both a 2.7 GPA and a minimum score of 378 on the MAT or 290 on the GRE. Students not meeting all program admission guidelines may be admitted with restrictions upon recommendation of the dean of the School of Education.

The restrictive admission status will be removed when the enrollee has completed the first three courses with a minimum grade of B in each of those courses. Master of Arts in Teaching students must show proof of a passing score on PRAXIS II Content Knowledge Test. Failure to meet this stipulation during any of the first three consecutive courses will result in disenrollment.

Appeal Procedure

Applicants for the M.Ed. programs who are denied admission and wish to appeal that denial must complete the following:

  1. A request in writing to the dean of the School of Education for a review of their admission file
  2. All appropriate documents related to admission
  3. A personal interview with the dean of the School of Education and appropriate faculty (Admissions Committee) if requested

For the MLIS, VISION, and Teacher Leader programs, the decision of the admissions committee is final and is not subject to appeal. Applicants may reactivate their admissions file for consideration in a subsequent year.

Academic Load

Typically, graduate students at the master's level take six hours during the fall and spring semesters. During the summer semester, it may be appropriate to register for up to 12 hours. Master's programs for non-teaching professionals may vary in course load per semester. To receive financial aid, students must be enrolled for a minimum of three (3) semester hours. Six hours is considered a full-time load during the academic calendar year.

Academic Standing and Probation/Suspension

Regardless of the load carried per semester, each student must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) to remain in good standing. If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, the student will be declared on academic probation for the following semester. Upon regaining the required cumulative average, 3.0, the student will be in good standing. However, if the student does not meet the cumulative average of 3.0 during the probationary semester, he/she will be declared on academic suspension for the subsequent semester and until reinstated by the admissions committee.

Advising

Because Trevecca's graduate programs are non-traditional and have standardized curricula, advising, though significant, does not follow the traditional pattern. All students begin with a group that takes the same classes on the same schedule. The only exceptions are non-degree seeking students, students who have earned transfer credit, or the occasional student whose program is interrupted. Students receive the tentative program of study for their entire program when a new group begins and each semester receive a tentative schedule of classes. Students must maintain flexibility in schedules to allow for possible changes in dates of courses.

The University maintains communication with the student in at least four ways. First, students receive a packet of information. Second, through the instructors, the students know the procedures for their program. Third, information on a range of topics is communicated through the student representative, chosen by each group, and through e-mail. Fourth, students are assigned to an advisor who is a full-time faculty member.

The primary responsibilities of the advisor are to:

Attendance and Schedule Changes

Students receive the tentative program of study for their entire program when a new group begins and a tentative schedule of classes each semester. Students must maintain flexibility in schedules to allow for possible changes in dates of courses including but not limited to University schedule changes and inclement weather closures. An absence due to schedule changes is still considered an absence as explained in the attendance policy.

Class attendance is an important student obligation, and each student is responsible for all work conducted in class meetings. Making up missed class time is impossible; therefore, maintaining the integrity of the course dictates the necessity of the following attendance policy:

Background Checks and Liability Insurance

For all programs, in order to participate in the practicums and student teaching experiences, all students will be required to either show proof of a current background check or undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning their first class. Students will be notified of the specific vendor. A disruption in participation in any program may require an additional background check. Students must notify the University representative prior to registering for additional classes.

Students are required to show proof of current professional liability insurance. This may be obtained by joining STEA or through another insurance carrier of the student's choice.

Candidacy for the Master's Degree

To be admitted to candidacy for the master's degree, the student must have successfully completed the first 12 semester hours of the program, have submitted a candidacy form, and be recommended by the dean after faculty review of candidate's file including dispositions and class attendance. The candidacy forms are provided by the Office of the School of Education.

Program Completers

To be considered program completers, students who are in programs leading to initial certification (M.A.T., M.A.E, ...) must meet all of the following criteria:

Licensure Requirements

In order to be recommended for licensure, students must complete all requirements to become a program completer and submit the required licensure paperwork.

Financial Services

Satisfactory Progress

Any student who drops below half-time status (3 credit hours for master's, 3 credit hours for doctoral) for two consecutive semesters will be suspended from financial aid. This suspension will require the student to pay for at least three hours with his or her own resources before he or she can regain eligibility for aid. A student may appeal the suspension to the review committee.

Endorsement only students will not receive financial aid.

Students must submit a new Free Application for Federal Student Aid for each academic year they are enrolled and want to receive federal loans. All students must contact the Office of Financial Aid if they want subsequent loans. Financial aid packets and additional information concerning financial aid may be obtained by calling the Office of Financial Aid at (615) 248-1242.

Tuition and Fees:

The tuition for each graduate degree in the School of Education is a fixed rate divided among the semesters identified for program completion for a specific cohort. Students who do not finish with the cohort with which they began or who change programs will be assigned to a new cohort and must pay the tuition rate and fees paid by the new cohort to which they are assigned. All fees are non-refundable. Tuition refunds are per university policy.

Master of Arts in Teaching K-6/ 7-12

 

Tuition and Fees (33 semester hours)

619/hr

Transitional Mentoring for 2 semesters

1,600

Total Program Cost ($619/hr X 33) + (1,600.00)


22,027

 

 

Master of Education: English Language Learners (ELL)

 

Tuition and Fees (30 semester hours)

610/hr

Total Program Cost ($610 X 30)

18,300

Endorsement only (12 semester hours)


7,320

Master of Education: Educational Leadership (EL)

 

Tuition and Fees (30 semester hours) per hour

471/hr

Total Program Cost ($471 X 30)

14,130

Licensure only Tuition and Fees (24 semester hours)


11,304

with 9 hours transfer credit

7,065

 

 

Master of Education in Library and Information Science (MLIS)

 

Tuition and Fees (33 semester hours)

610/hr

Total Program Cost ($610 X 30)

20,130

Endorsement only (21 semester hours)


12,810

*To add initial licensure, additional courses/tuition and fees determined by transcript analysis.

 

 

 

Master of Education: Teacher Leader

 

Tuition and Fees (30 semester hours)

610/hr

Those not selected for the Mentor Residency Grant and for all who continue the program we offer a 20% discount

 

Total Program Cost for the above mentioned persons ($488 X 30)


14,640

 

 

Master of Education: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction

 

Tuition and Fees (30 semester hours)

375/hr

Technology fee for each course-$50

 

Total Program Cost ($375 X 30) + ($50 X 9)


11,700

Texts not included

 

Master of Education: Visual Impairments Special Education

 

Tuition and Fees (30 semester hours)

400/hr

Those not selected for the grant will be offered a 25% discount

 

Total Program Cost for the above mentioned persons


9,000

 

 

Doctor of Education: Leadership and Professional Practice (Ed.D.)

 

Tuition and Fees (57 semester hours)

691/hr

Total Program Costs


39,387

Grading System–Master’s Program

The master's program grading scale is as follows:

Quality Points Per Semester Hour

Exceptional

A

4.0

 

A–

3.7

Superior

B+

3.3

 

B

3.0

 

B–

2.7

Average

C+

2.3

 

C

2.0

 

C–

1.7

Unacceptable

D+

1.3

 

D

1.0

 

D–

0.7

Failing

F

0.0

Incomplete

I

0.0

Withdrawal

W

0.0

Note:

Exceptions to grading scales will be noted in course syllabus.

Incompletes are permitted only in the event of extenuating circumstances and with approval from the dean.

Graduation Requirements

To receive a Master's degree, the student must meet the following academic requirements:

Program Evaluation and Assessment

A Course and Instructor Evaluation is administered at the end of courses. Forms are distributed electronically by the institutional research department. The evaluation is considered a personal assessment; therefore, discussion of any kind during the process should not occur. In order to maintain high quality instruction in all the classes, instructors receive the results of the evaluations after all grades have been submitted. Courses include several types of evaluative and assessment measures related to student progress. An evaluation of the program takes place at the Exit Assessment.

Second Master's Degree

When a graduate from a Trevecca School of Education master's degree program desires to add a master's degree in another program, he or she will take all courses in the major and enough electives from other program areas (other than the core courses that are common to most M.Ed. programs) to complete 30 hours of course work.

Master of Arts in Teaching

The Master of Arts in Teaching is a non-traditional program designed to accommodate working adults who have an undergraduate degree. No graduate credit may be transferred to the MAT programs.

The MAT K-6 is designed for individuals who have an undergraduate degree in a field other than elementary education and who desire a degree and/or licensure at the K-6 level.

The MAT 7-12 is designed for individuals who have an undergraduate degree in one of the following content areas of study:

Program of Study MAT K-6

This five to six semester program is comprised of thirty hours of course work and six hours of student teaching. A 30-hour, non-licensure option without student teaching is available; however, this option does not qualify as full completion of the teacher education program. All candidates must complete and present the Electronic Portfolio prior to graduation.

Transition License: Students who accept employment for full-time teaching while enrolled in the MAT are achieving teacher licensure through a transitional licensure process and must participate in a mentoring plan as required by the Tennessee State Department of Education. To meet this requirement, one year of successful teaching coupled with mentoring is required in lieu of the traditional one semester of student teaching. As stated in the Nashville Area Alternative Licensure Consortium plan, mentoring is to be jointly provided by the employing school district and by the respective university during the time that the student is enrolled.

Trevecca will assign a mentor to work with the student. The role of the mentor is to coach and assist the student; the mentor does not serve as an evaluator of the student's progress. As required, the student will attend seminars and other professional development provided by the university.

The MAT summer class sessions are accelerated and intensive. Students can earn a total of three credit hours over the course of a three-week period. Therefore, it is imperative that all students be present for the entirety of each class. There will be a reduction of one letter grade for any student who is absent up to three hours. Any absence from a summer class that exceeds three hours may result in disenrollment from the course.

CORE COURSES

TMA 6603

Curriculum and Technological Design

6

EDU 551C

Psychological Foundations of Learning+

3

EDU 552C

Assessment for Excellence

3

EDU 6360

Legal, Ethical, and Cultural Competencies+

3

EDU 6500

Classroom Organization and Management for Urban Educators

3

TMA 6680

Teaching the Exceptional Learner+

3

MAJOR COURSES

TMA 6623

Interdisciplinary Elementary Methods+

9

TMA 6690

Practicum*

0

TMA 6650

Student Teaching and Seminar

6

 

OR

 

TMA 6710
TMA 6715

Transitional Licensure Seminar I
and
Transitional Licensure Seminar II

2

1

 

Additional Licensure Seminars through completion of program

 

TMA 6660-
6664

E-Portfolio Seminar

 

TOTAL HOURS

33-36

+Includes a required practicum. In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences

* Consist of a 60 hour practicum that must be completed prior to being admitted to student teaching. Forty (40) hours of this practicum are incorporated in coursework. In order to participate in the mandatory practicums, all MAT students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

The Praxis II test, Elementary Education: Content Knowledge, is the required Admissions test. A passing score on the Praxis II Content Knowledge test must be submitted to the School of Education before the completion of nine semester hours of coursework. Other required tests: (1) Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) K-6; (2) Elementary Education: Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment; (3) Reading across the Curriculum: Elementary. Must be passed prior to student teaching.

Program of Study MAT 7-12

This five to six semester program is comprised of thirty hours of course work and six hours of student teaching. A 30-hour, non-licensure option without student teaching is available; however, this option does not qualify as full completion of the teacher education program. All candidates must complete and present the Electronic Portfolio prior to graduation.

Transition License: Students who accept employment for full-time teaching while enrolled in the MAT are achieving teacher licensure through a transitional licensure process and must participate in a mentoring plan as required by the Tennessee State Department of Education. To meet this requirement, one year of successful teaching coupled with mentoring is required in lieu of the traditional one semester of student teaching. As stated in the Nashville Area Alternative Licensure Consortium plan, mentoring is to be jointly provided by the employing school district and by the respective university during the time that the student is enrolled.

Trevecca will assign a mentor to work with the student. The role of the mentor is to coach and assist the student; the mentor does not serve as an evaluator of the student's progress. As required, the student will attend seminars and other professional development provided by the University.

The MAT summer class sessions are accelerated and intensive. Students can earn a total of three credit hours over the course of a three-week period. Therefore, it is imperative that all students be present for the entirety of each class. There will be a reduction of one letter grade for any student who is absent up to three hours. Any absence from a summer class that exceeds three hours may result in disenrollment from the course.

CORE COURSES

TMA 6603

Curriculum and Technological Design

6

EDU 551C

Psychological Foundations of Learning+

3

EDU 552C

Assessment for Excellence

3

EDU 6360

Legal, Ethical, and Cultural Competencies+

3

EDU 6500

Classroom Organization and Management for Urban Educators

3

TMA 6680

Teaching the Exceptional Learner+

3

MAJOR COURSES

TMA 6628

Interdisciplinary Secondary Methods+

9

TMA 6690

Practicum*

0

TMA 6665

Student Teaching and Seminar 7-12

6

 

OR

 

TMA 6710
TMA 6715

Transitional Licensure Seminar I and
Transitional Licensure Seminar II

2
1

 

Additional Licensure Seminars through completion of program

0

TMA 6660-6664

E-Portfolio Seminar

 

TOTAL HOURS

33-36

+Includes a required practicum. In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences.

* Consist of a 60-hour practicum that must be completed prior to being admitted to student teaching. Forty (40) hours of this practicum are incorporated in coursework. In order to participate in the mandatory practicums, all MAT students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

The Praxis content area test is the required admissions test. A passing score on the content test must be submitted to the School of Education before the completion of nine hours of coursework. All other required tests applicable to certification must be passed prior to student teaching.

Master of Arts in Education: Teaching (Fifth-Year Residency Program)

This program is designed as a cohort model. The first four years of the program will result in a baccalaureate degree in education chosen from the teacher education degrees listed in the University catalog. The fifth year of study will consist of a residency in an urban public school setting. Candidates completing the fifth-year residency will be awarded a Master of Arts in Education: Teaching degree and be eligible for licensure in the major area of study plus endorsement in ELL or SPED.

Mission

To prepare effective and committed teachers who are prepared to accelerate achievement for all students in urban schools.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate basic writing, grammar, reading, computational, and technological skills;
  2. Demonstrate mastery of content knowledge in the development and needs of children;
  3. Demonstrate the skills of an effective teacher in the urban classroom and settings; and
  4. Demonstrate the professional dispositions of an effective teacher.

Admission Criteria

Candidates will be required to declare their intentions for application to the residency program at the end of their undergraduate sophomore year, and applications will be due no later than April 15. Admission criteria include:

  1. Completion of the eighth semester prerequisite hours;
  2. Passing scores on all required PRAXIS tests before October 15 of the senior year;
  3. GPA of 3.0;
  4. A score of 378 or better on Miller's Analogies Test;
  5. Score of 12/15 on the Writing on Demand Assessment;
  6. Documentation of positive experiences with children;
  7. Successful scores on an admissions interview;
  8. Three reference forms with acceptable scores.

If a candidate declares but does not meet the admissions criteria, the candidate may graduate non-licensure provided all requirements for graduation have been met. If any of the admissions criteria are lacking, the candidate may defer until the next cohort acceptance date and, upon completion of criteria, move back into the sequence for a new cohort. If the candidate decides to graduate non-licensure, does not return for the fifth year of the program, and later decides to return as a post-baccalaureate candidate, the requirement of an additional 12 hours prior to student teaching will be in effect.

The Master of Arts in Education: Teaching is the second stage of the Fifth-Year Residency Program offered to undergraduates at Trevecca. The year-long residency will meet the state requirement of student teaching.

Program of Study for Master of Arts in Education: Teaching (Fifth-Year Residency Program)

Master of Arts in Education: Teaching Coursework

35

EDU

6450

Social Justice in the Community

(2)

EDU

6455

Transformational Learning Environments

(2)

EDU

6310

Research I: Thesis Development

(2)

EDU

6410

Residency I

(6)

EDU

6460

Intensive Literacy and Assessment

(3)

EDU

6315

Research II: Implementation

(1)

EDU

6415

Residency II

(6)

EDU

6465

Current Diversity Issues

(3)

EDU

6320

Research III: Data Collection and Analysis

(1)

ESL Endorsement

 

ELL

6000

Language Acquisition and Learning

(3)

ELL

6010

Trends, Models, Methods in ELL Instruction

(3)

ELL

6055

Linguistics for Teachers of ELL

(3)

Special Education Endorsement

 

SED

6010

Instructional Methods for Elementary Students with Mile and Moderate Disabilities or

(3)

SED

6020

Instructional Methods for Adolescents and Secondary School Students

(3)

SED

6030

Collaboration and Consultation for Students with Disabilities

(2)

SED

6040

Instructional Practices in Inclusive Settings

(2)

SED

6070

Instructional Methods of Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities

(2)

Master of Education: Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction (K-12)

The M.Ed. in Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction Program is appropriate for individuals who wish to continue working as teachers and to increase their knowledge and skills regarding curriculum, assessment, and instruction. This degree does not lead to licensure.

The design of the M.Ed. Program in Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction includes 30 semester hours during 4 semesters of online coursework.

Program of Study for CAI

CORE COURSES:

GEN 0000

Introduction to Online Learning

NC

EDU 6830

Curriculum Planning and Instructional Practice

3

EDU 6835

Practicum Focusing on Educational Collaboration and Staff Development

1

EDU 6710

Technology Integration in Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6720

Action Research for School Improvement

3

EDU 6725

Data Analysis for School Improvement

3

EDU 6730

Practicum Focusing on School Improvement Planning+

1

EDU 6740

Inclusive Practices for Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6770

Leading Curricular Change

3

EDU 6840

Creating Effective Classroom Environments for Instruction

3

EDU 6845

Practicum Best Practices in Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction+

1

RDG 6000

Advanced Literacy/Reading Instruction: Theory and Practice

3

ELL 6000

Language Acquisition and Learning

3

EDU 6800

Exit Assessment/E-Portfolio

NC

TOTAL HOURS

30

In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences. In order to participate in mandatory experiences, all students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

Master of Education: Educational Leadership

The Master of Education in Educational Leadership program is designed to prepare school leaders. The program courses and experiences prepare students to take the School Leader Licensure Assessment (SLLA), a passing score on this national test prior to awarding the degree is required by the state.

The design of the M.Ed. program in educational leadership for on-campus and off-campus classes includes 30 semester hours over a 15-month period. The delivery system format includes a variety of instructional strategies including lecture, group projects, small group discussions, technology presentations, guest speakers, field trips, and instructor-student interactions. To meet the requirements of the Tennessee State Board of Education, Trevecca must have an agreement with the Tennessee school districts from which applicants are selected.

In addition to the general admissions requirements, the specific admission requirements for applicants for the master of education in educational leadership degree are as follows:

  1. Must verify 3 years of successful teaching experience through references by school administrator.
  2. Submit written response to questions regarding (a) applicant's leadership background and goals and (b) applicant's methods for assessing student learning.

Licensure-only in Educational Leadership

This non-degree offering is available to individuals who hold an education-related master's degree. The standardized test that is required for admission to a master's program does not apply for licensure only. The program consists of 24 hours as follows. Will accept 9 hours of equivalent transfer graduating credit per approval of the program coordinator.

EDU 6001

Practicum A for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6010

Leadership for Instructional Effectiveness

3

EDU 6002

Practicum B for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6020

Decision Making for Instructional Improvement

3

EDU 6003

Practicum C for School Leaders+

 

EDU 6030

Curriculum for Instructional Leaders

3

EDU 6035

Law, Ethics, and Politics for School Leaders

3

EDU 6004

Practicum D for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6040

Valuing Diversity for School Effectiveness

3

EDU 6045

Assessing Learning for School Improvement

3

EDU 6050

Summative Assessment Seminar for School Leaders

2

TOTAL HOURS

 

24

A passing score on the SLLA exam, submitted to TNU, is required prior to awarding of degree and recommendation for licensure.

Instructional Leadership License - Beginning (ILL-B)

Requirements for the Instructional Leadership License - Beginning for the state of Tennessee include:

  1. Complete required coursework in Educational Leadership
  2. Pass State required test (School Leaders Licensure Assessment – PRAXIS 6011) with a minimum score of 160.
  3. Submit a copy of test score to School of Education
  4. The Instructional Leadership License - Beginning (graduate of Trevecca) is responsible for contacting the dean of the School of Education to set up a professional plan for moving from ILL-B to ILL-P.
  5. The Instructional Leadership License - Beginning must submit appropriate forms to State Department of Education to verify advancement to ILL-P.

Salary and Licensure Requirement: The State requires instructional leadership licensure, along with the required coursework, to grant master's degree. Trevecca will post conferral of a Master of Education degree in Educational Leadership upon the receipt of a score of 160 or better on the School Leaders Licensure Assessment. It is the candidate's responsibility to provide Trevecca with a copy of his or her SLLA score.

Instructional Leadership License - Professional (ILL-P)

Candidates for licensure from the State of Tennessee must meet specific requirements to obtain ILL-P:

  1. The ILL-P must hold the ILL-B and have completed three years as an instructional leader according to State of Tennessee Guidelines.
  2. The ILL-B (graduate of Trevecca) is responsible for contacting the dean of the School of Education to set up a professional plan for moving from ILL-B to ILL-P.
  3. ILL-B must submit appropriate forms to the State Department of Education to verify ILL-P.

Program of Study for Master of Education: Educational Leadership

CORE COURSES IN THE PREFERRED SEQUENCE:

EDU 6001

Practicum A for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6010

Leadership for Instructional Effectiveness

3

EDU 6015

Technology for Instructional Leaders

3

EDU 6002

Practicum B for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6020

Decision Making for Instructional Improvement

3

EDU 6025

Using Research and Data for Improved Student Learning

3

EDU 6003

Practicum C for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6030

Curriculum for Instructional Leaders

3

EDU 6035

Law, Ethics, and Politics for School Leaders

3

EDU 6004

Practicum D for School Leaders+

1

EDU 6040

Valuing Diversity for School Effectiveness

3

EDU 6045

Assessing Learning for School Improvement

3

EDU 6050

Summative Assessment Seminar for School Leaders

2

TOTAL HOURS

30

In order to demonstrate leadership practices that facilitate student achievement, students are required to complete practicum courses.

Salary and Licensure Requirement: The State requires instructional leadership licensure, along with the required coursework, to grant master's degree students credit for salary purposes.

For Trevecca to complete state paperwork to verify student's completion of the program and to recommend licensure as a school instructional leader, students must successfully complete the SLLA and the passing score of 160 received by Trevecca.

See also the general admission requirements for this program. Graduates from this program may qualify for the Instructional Leadership License (ILL-B).

Master of Education: English Language Learners PreK-12

The Master of Education in English Language Learners program is designed to provide currently licensed teachers who desire to become teachers of English Language Learners with sequential and integrated experiences. The ELL master's program will enable teachers to develop expertise in language acquisition, appropriate instructional models, curriculum design, culture, assessment, technology, and linguistics.

The Master of Education English Language Learners degree consists of a total of 30 hours. Nine hours are core courses in education, and 21 hours are in the major. For students wishing a recommendation from Trevecca Nazarene University for an add-on-endorsement in English Language Learners (ELL), twelve (12) hours of coursework and a passing score on the Praxis II, English to Speakers of Other Languages (0360) is required.

The master's program in ELL is approved but may not be offered depending on enrollment. Endorsement only courses will be offered as needed.

Program of Study for ELL

CORE COURSES 9 hours

TMA 6680

Teaching the Exceptional Learner +

3

EDU 551C

Psychological Foundations of Learning+

3

EDU 568C

Legal, Ethical, and Diversity Issues in Education

3

MAJOR COURSES: In addition to 9 hours of core courses, the following 21 hours in ELL Instruction (K-6) are required:

ELL 6000

Language Acquisition and Learning+

3

ELL 6010

Trends, Models and Methods in ELL Instruction+

3

ELL 6020

Authentic Language Curriculum Design

3

ELL 6030

Culture+ (hybrid)

3

ELL 6040

Methods of Assessment and Evaluation for ELL

3

ELL 6050

Technology and Language Learning

3

ELL 6055

Linguistics for Teachers of English Language Learners

3

ELL 6600

E-Portfolio

0

TOTAL HOURS

30

+Includes a required practicum. In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences. In order to participate in the mandatory field experiences, all students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

Endorsement for English Language Learners

ELL 6000

Language Acquisition and Learning

3

ELL 6010

Trends, Models and Methods in ELL Instruction+

3

ELL 6040

Methods of Assessment and Evaluation for ELL

3

ELL 6055

Linguistics for Teachers of English Language Learners

3

ELL 6065

Review for PRAXIS Test

0

TOTAL HOURS

 

12

+Includes a required practicum. In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences. In order to participate in mandatory experiences, all students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

Master of Library and Information Science K-12

The Master of Library and Information Science program provides prospective school librarians with a concentrated focus appropriate for grades kindergarten through twelve. This program is designed for individuals who seek licensure as a school library information specialist. May be appropriate for public librarian training.

The MLIS program is organized as a standardized, peer-group program which means that all students in a group will take all courses together. All students are assigned for program advising.

The MLIS program consists of 33 semester hours that will be completed in a 15-month period. An e-portfolio is maintained throughout the program and is presented as part of the Exit Seminar. Individuals seeking licensure as a school library information specialist must pass the PRAXIS Specialty Test for Library Media Specialists.

Because the MLIS degree is considered a terminal degree for this area of study, no grade lower than B- will be accepted for graduation. A student who makes less than a B- must repeat the course.

Specific admission requirements for applicants for Master of Library and Information Science degree are as follows:

  1. Each applicant will need an email account which will be used regularly for the purpose of communicating with instructors.
  2. Upon notification of acceptance, selected applicants will complete a technology pre-assessment via e-mail prior to first class session.

The admission process must be completed prior to attending the first class session.

Each peer group begins the program with the summer semester. The deadline for application file completion is February 15.

Program of Study for MLIS

CORE COURSES:

MLI 5000

Professional and Ethical Issues

3

MLI 5010

Information Technologies I

3

MLI 5020

Information Technologies II

3

MLI 5030

Knowledge Environment

3

MLI 5040

Fiction/Non-Fiction Resources for Children and Young Adults

3

MLI 5050

Research Tools and Strategies

3

MLI 5060

Knowledge Management

3

MLI 5070

Knowledge Leadership

3

MLI 5080

Collection Development and Organization

3

MLI 5090

Professional Practice+

6

 

or

 

MLI 5200

Enhanced Student Teaching

 

MLI 5600

E-Portfolio and Exit Assessment

0

TOTAL HOURS:

33

+Includes a required practicum. In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences. In order to participate in mandatory experiences, all students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

Initial Licensure as School Library Media Specialist

Individuals who do not hold a teaching certificate and who are seeking initial licensure as a school library information specialist only (not as a classroom teacher) must complete course requirements in addition to the 33 hours required in the master's of library and information science program. Courses will be assigned with a transcript evaluation.

Experience Enhanced Student Teaching in two library settings full-time for fifteen weeks in lieu of the 200-hour professional practice required by the MLIS degree coursework. Student teaching will occur in the spring semester prior to completion of MLIS course-work during the summer semester or in the fall semester following completion of the MLIS course-work. Application for student teaching should be made through the undergraduate teacher education process.

Endorsement Option

This option is designed for those who hold a valid Tennessee teaching certificate in another teaching area and a master's degree in education. To have "Library Media Specialist P-12" added to a teaching certificate, a student must successfully complete the requirements of the 12 hours of course work and 6 hours of practicum as prescribed by the Tennessee Department of Education and pass the required PRAXIS test for Library Media Specialist with a score established by the Tennessee Department of Education for a total of 18 graduate hours. Students must also take a Children and Young Adult Literature course if one has not been taken previously for a total of 21 hours. Further, students must be recommended for licensure by the Trevecca Certification Officer.

Required Courses:

MLI 5000

Professional and Ethical Issues

3

MLI 5040

Fiction/Nonfiction Resources for Children and Young Adults (required if do not have previous children/adolescent literature course determined by transcript analysis)

3

MLI 5050

Research Tools and Strategies

3

MLI 5060

Knowledge Management

3

MLI 5080

Collection Development and Organization

3

MLI 5090

Professional Practice (200 hours)

6

Master of Education: Teacher Leader PreK-12

The master's degree in Teacher Leader is designed for classroom teachers with a minimum of three years successful experience to equip them with the knowledge and skills to work effectively with colleagues as leaders of school improvement. The 30 hour program, organized on a cohort model, is designed to be highly selective; a limited number of applicants of superior quality will be admitted. Applicants must demonstrate strong aptitude for leadership and a high degree of professional competence including exceptional professional attitudes, willingness to share expertise and to work collaboratively with colleagues, and exhibit essential work habits.

Program of Study for Teacher Leader

EDU 6700

Quality Curriculum and Instructional Practice

3

EDU 6705

Practicum Focusing on Staff Development+

1

EDU 6710

Technology Integration in Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6715

Leadership Styles and Beliefs

3

EDU 6720

Action Research for School Improvement

3

EDU 6725

Data Analysis for School Improvement

3

EDU 6730

Practicum Focusing on School Improvement+

1

EDU 6735

Effective Classroom Environment for Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6740

Inclusive Practices in Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6745

Mentoring Strategies

3

EDU 6850

Coaching Strategies for Teacher Leaders

3

EDU 6750

Practicum Focusing on Mentoring/Coaching+

1

EDU 6760

Exit Assessmen/E-Portfolio

nc

TOTAL HOURS

30

Master of Education: Modified Special Education K-12

The master's in special education provides prospective teachers of students with special needs a concentrated focus appropriate to grades kindergarten through twelve. This program provides an additional endorsement in special education for teachers who are already licensed to teach and initial licensure as a special education teacher only. Courses are designed to enable teachers to develop expertise in general knowledge of special education, appropriate instructional models, accommodations specific to special needs populations, curriculum design, assessment, technology, as well as legal issues pertinent to special education. This program is approved; however, it is not currently being offered.

Program of Study for Masters in Modified Special Education

EDU 550C

Curriculum Design and Practice

3

EDU 568C

Legal, Ethical, and Diversity Issues in Education

3

TMA 6670

Urban Perspectives in Teaching and Learning

3

SED 6000

Foundations of Special Education

3

SED 6010

Instructional Methods for Elementary Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities

3

SED 6020

Instructional Methods for Adolescents and Secondary School Students

3

SED 6030

Collaboration and Consultation for Students with Disabilities

2

SED 6040

Instructional Practices in Inclusive Settings

2

SED 6050

Procedures for Classroom Management

3

SED 6060

Assessment Procedures for Students with Disabilities

3

SED 6070

Instructional Methods of Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities

2

SED 6660

E-Portfolio

0

TOTAL HOURS

30-36

If completing for an initial licensure, testing, student teaching or transition licensure requirements apply.

Master of Education: Visual Impairments Special Education

The Vision Institute is a master's degree program at Trevecca Nazarene University designed to equip teachers to work as special education teachers who are viewed as visual impairments experts, and may serve as itinerant teachers for students with visual impairments and other disabilities, and in specialized settings such as Tennessee School for the Blind.

In addition to course work, students will complete practicum hours in special education classrooms, a two-day, overnight experience at Tennessee School for the Blind, and a two week 40 hour practicum.

Trevecca's Vision Institute is funded through a grant from the State of Tennessee's Department of Education. To receive this scholarship in the master's program, individuals are required to agree to a service commitment upon completion of licensure requirements. This service agreement will be two years in Tennessee public schools, as one of the following: a teacher at Tennessee School for the Blind, an itinerant teacher serving students with visual impairment, blindness or other disabilities; or a special education teacher.

Upon completion of the Vision Institute program, individuals will have a grace period of six months to secure employment and will have four years to fulfill the two year service requirement. The program is also available to individuals who do not wish to commit to the two year service agreement but do want the degree. Tuition for such individuals will be at the regular graduation education tuition rate/fees.

**Funds for this program are contingent on annual grant renewal by the state of Tennessee.**

Program of Study for Visual Impairments Special Education

VIS 6010

Special Education and Visual Impairments

3

VIS 6020

Introduction to Braille

4

EDU 6075

Diversity in Classrooms and Schools

2

VIS 6030

Advanced Braille

3

EDU 6080

Interdisciplinary Teaching

3

VIS 6040

Practicum I

0

VIS 6045

Anatomy and Issues of Visual Learning

3

EDU 6085

Differentiated Teaching

3

VIS 6055

Practicum II

0

VIS 6060

Expanded Core Curriculum

3

VIS 6065

Nemeth Code

3

VIS 6070

Assessment for Visual Impairments

3

VIS 6090

Exit Assessment

0

TOTAL HOURS

30

Master of Education: Reading PreK-12

The master's program in reading is designed to provide prospective reading teachers sequential and integrated experiences in the areas of the reading curriculum ranging from grades pre-kindergarten through twelve. The reading program will enable teachers to develop expertise in design, delivery, diagnosis, and assessment of reading domains. Students can meet course requirements for Tennessee licensure standards in reading PreK-12 and have a passing score on the state required PRAXIS assessment. This program is not designed for individuals seeking initial certification. Students in the master's degree must hold a professional license. Prior to admission, applicants must show evidence of having completed a minimum of 18 months as a successful full-time teacher of record. The master's program in reading is approved; however, it is not being offered at this time.

Program of Study for Reading

EDU 6705

Practicum Focusing on Staff Development

1

EDU 6715

Leadership Styles and Beliefs

3

EDU 6720

Action Research for School Improvement

3

EDU 6725

Data Analysis for School Improvement

3

EDU 6730

Practicum Focusing on School Improvement Planning

1

EDU 6740

Inclusive Practices in Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6745

Mentoring Strategies

3

EDU 6850

Coaching Strategies for Teacher Leaders

3

EDU 6750

Practicum Focusing on Mentoring/Coaching

1

RDG 6000

Advance Literacy/Reading Instructions: Theory and Practice

3

RDG 6020

Literature and Book Selection for Children and Adolescents (if not taken for initial certification)

3

RDG 6030

Analysis Correction of Reading Problems

3

RDG 6080

Literacy Application for Instruction

3

RDG 6600

E-Portfolio

0

TOTAL HOURS

33

In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences. In order to participate in mandatory experiences, all students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

Reading Endorsement

The reading endorsement requires a master's degree and 18 months teaching experience for admissions.

RDG 6000

Advance Literacy/Reading Instructions: Theory and Practice

3

RDG 6010

Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Middle and Secondary Schools

3

RDG 6020

Literature and Book Selection for Children and Adolescents (if not taken for initial certification)

3

RDG 6030

Analysis Correction of Reading Problems

3

RDG 6040

Diverse Learners and Literacy Instruction

3

RDG 6050

Reading: Supervision and Leadership

3

RDG 6060

Seminar in Reading

3

RDG 6070

Action Research in Reading

3

TOTAL HOURS

21-24

In order to show that when teaching, students learn, students are required to complete clinical experiences. In order to participate in mandatory experiences, all students will be required to undergo a background check and be fingerprinted, at the student's expense, prior to beginning the first class.

Master of Education: Instructional Technology PreK-12

The Master of Education in Instructional Technology PreK-12 program provides prospective technology specialists with a concentrated focus appropriate to grades pre-kindergarten through twelve. However, it is appropriate for higher education or other venues which provide training in technology. This program is designed as an additional field of expertise for individuals who are already licensed as teachers although teaching licensure is not a prerequisite. Students must have access to the current version of Microsoft Office Suite, Internet, and email. Additional technology hardware and software requirements will be given to students at the admissions interview. The master's program in instructional technology is approved; however, it is not being offered at this time.

Program of Study for Instructional Technology

EDU 6700

Quality Curriculum and Instructional Practice

3

EDU 6740

Inclusive Practices in Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6720

Action Research for School Improvement

3

EDU 6725

Data Analysis for School Improvement

3

EDU 6735

Effective Classroom Environments for Teaching and Learning

3

EDU 6710

Technology Integration in Teaching and Learning

3

ETM 5030

Application Software for Educational Settings

3

ETM 5040

Instructional Design and Multimedia Authoring

3

ETM 5050

Technology Planning and Administration

3

ETM 5060

Practicum

3

ETM 5070

Exit Assessment

0

TOTAL HOURS

30

Ed.D.: Leadership and Professional Practice

The Ed.D. in Leadership and Professional Practice is a non-traditional doctoral program designed for professionals in various fields such as medicine, religion, business, non-profit, and education. The program extends for nine semesters over 36 months. A major scientifically based research dissertation is completed in concert with the coursework. The program is designed around a cohort model and a rigorous, standardized curriculum. A nine-day, on-campus residency period is required during the three summers of the student's program. The instructional delivery system includes extended time beyond actual class meetings for reflections, lectures, group work, technology, presentations, and research reports. This is not a licensure program.

Admission

Selection into the Ed.D. program is for individuals holding an earned master's degree from a regionally accredited educational institution. To begin the process of selection consideration, the student will be required to submit:

  1. Application with $50.00 nonrefundable fee
  2. Official transcripts of degrees (undergraduate, master's, ...) from regionally accredited colleges/universities with at least a 3.4 GPA at the master's level. Individuals whose master's programs gave "pass" or "fail" in lieu of grades will submit a description of the admission requirements to the master's program, and a letter from an official of the institution regarding the likelihood of the applicant's success in a doctoral program.
  3. Two reference forms from individuals who know the applicant's abilities.

Selection is based on the evaluation of the following components:

  1. Test Score (submit one test score) – MAT, GRE
  2. Professional Experiences

    Resume (follow the specified format)

    Reference Forms (These should attest the potential ability for success in doctoral studies, and be completed by employer, professor, or supervisor.)

  3. Interview - An individual interview will be conducted by the Admissions Committee. This will be an opportunity to assess personal goals, oral communication skills, and ability to interact with other professionals.
  4. Writing sample - A critique on a specific topic will be required at the time of the personal interview. Guidelines will be provided regarding the expectations of the critique. The critique must be submitted via Internet and hard copy. Hand written copy is not accepted. The Trevecca computer lab will be available for this writing sample.

Each new cohort is selected in March and begins the program with the summer semester.

Admissions Committee

The purpose of the admissions committee is to review the data submitted for entry into the doctoral program. Because selection is based on a composite evaluation, the committee will determine whether the applicant is accepted or denied.

The School of Education Admissions Committee decision for acceptance or denial to the program is final and is not subject to appeal. The admissions committee is comprised of selected School of Education faculty.

Appeals

For the Ed.D. program, the decision of the School of Education admissions committee is final and is not subject to appeal. Applicants may reactivate their admissions file for consideration in a subsequent year.

Academic Load

In the doctoral program, the class loads per semester during fall or spring semester will range from five to seven hours in addition to dissertation hours (see Matrix). Students will take two courses totaling seven to nine hours during the Intensified Summer Learning Experience.

Academic Standing and Probation/Suspension

Regardless of the load carried per semester, each candidate must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) to remain in good standing. If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0, the candidate will be declared on academic probation for the following semester. Upon regaining the required cumulative average, 3.0, the candidate will be in good standing. However, if the candidate does not meet the cumulative average of 3.0 during the probationary semester, he/she will be declared on academic suspension for the subsequent semester and until reinstated by the doctoral council. Failure to maintain the dissertation completion schedule may result in suspension or academic disenrollment from the program.

Advising

The Ed.D. Director, in concert with the doctoral council, seeks out University faculty who may have an interest or expertise in the areas in which the doctoral candidates conduct research. The Ed.D. Director of the School of Education carefully screens all potential advisers prior to submission to the doctoral council. Advisers are full-time professors within the University academic units; however, advisers may also be selected from faculty in other universities or part-time faculty at TNU.

Each doctoral candidate will be assigned a dissertation team. The dissertation team consists of the adviser and one additional member who serves as a reader for the dissertation. The adviser is the primary member of the dissertation team. Individuals selected to serve as readers hold the terminal degree and/or have exceptional expertise or experience.

If a candidate requests the assigned adviser or reader be changed, the doctoral council will determine if the request should be granted. If the change is granted, the fees to be charged to the candidate are as follows: $350 for change in adviser; $150 for change in reader.

Candidates are expected to keep in touch with their adviser throughout each semester. Advisers may be reached at 615-248-1201 or 1-800-284-1594, e-mail or voice mail.

Attendance and Schedule Changes

Candidates receive the tentative schedule of classes for the entire program when a new cohort begins. Candidates must maintain flexibility in schedules to allow for possible changes in dates of courses including but not limited to University schedule changes and inclement weather closures. An absence due to schedule changes is still considered an absence as explained in the attendance policy.

Class attendance is an important candidate obligation, and each candidate is responsible for all work conducted in class meetings. Making up missed class time is impossible; therefore, maintaining the integrity of the course dictates the necessity of the following attendance policy:

·An unexcused absence from a class session results in a penalty of one letter grade; two absences from a course for any reason result in disenrollment from that course.

·In the event of any absence, the student must submit a Class Absence Form to the Dean, School of Education. Additionally, the student is responsible for notifying the instructor and for making up the work according to the instructor's directions.

·The Class Absence Form is required for any absence, excused or unexcused. Weddings, vacations, family reunions, work-related activities, and university changes in schedules are examples of unexcused absences.

Candidacy for the Doctoral Degree

To be admitted to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the candidate must have successfully completed the first 18 semester hours of the program, have an unconditional approval of the dissertation proposal, and be recommended by the Ed.D. Director after faculty review of candidate's file including dispositions and class attendance. The candidacy forms are provided by the Office of the School of Education.

Grading System–Doctoral Program

The grading system for doctoral studies includes the letter grades A, B, C, and F for all courses except Dissertation and Technology. The grades of S or U will be assigned to the Dissertation and Technology. Courses with grades of C or U must be retaken. A grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained for satisfactory academic progress. Grades of F or D will likely result in disenrollment. Incompletes are permitted only in the event of extenuating circumstances and with approval from the dean.

Tuition and Fees

Any candidate who drops below half-time status (3 semester hours) for two consecutive semesters will be suspended from financial aid. This suspension will require the candidate to pay for at least three hours with his or her own resources before he or she can regain eligibility for aid. A candidate may appeal the suspension to the review committee.

Candidates must submit a new Free Application for Federal Student Aid for each academic year they are enrolled and want to receive federal loans. All candidates must contact the Office of Financial Aid if they want subsequent loans. Financial aid packets and additional information concerning financial aid may be obtained by calling the Office of Financial Aid at (615) 248-1242.

Ed.D. in Leadership and Professional Practice

 

Tuition and Fees (57 semester hours)

39,387.00

 

 

Additional if applicable

 

Each dissertation hour beyond 12 per semester hour

691.00

Course and Instructor Evaluation and Assessment

A Course and Instructor Evaluation is administered at the end of courses. Forms are distributed by student representatives, collected, placed in a sealed envelope, and returned to the School of Education by the student representative. The evaluation is considered a personal assessment; therefore, discussion of any kind during the process should not occur. In order to maintain high quality instruction in all the classes, instructors receive the results of the evaluations after all grades have been submitted. Courses include several types of evaluative and assessment measures related to student progress.

Program Completion and Extensions

The program is to be completed in three years. No candidate is to take longer than five years (registered for courses) to complete the program. Approved time extensions granted as outlined below, where the candidate is not currently registered for courses, is not considered against the time requirement for completion

  1. A reasonable extension of time may be considered for completing course requirements because of military service or illness involving hospitalization. The candidate must present official evidence for consideration of an extension.
  2. A candidate making satisfactory progress who drops out of the program may re-enter the program within two years at the point in the program sequence at which s/he departed.
  3. A candidate's decision to leave the program will result in assignment to a different cohort and in delayed graduation. The institution is not responsible for any inconvenience this may cause the student.
  4. If a candidate has been gone for more than two years and requests to return, the Ed.D. Director will determine if the individual may return, which courses must be repeated in order for the person to be assimilated back into the program, the cohort to which s/he will be assigned, and the point in the program when it is appropriate for the return.
  5. If a candidate requests or requires extended enrollment in dissertation hours, the student is responsible for additional charges including 1 credit hour per semester and any additional fees.

Graduation Requirements

To be eligible for graduation from the doctoral program, candidates must

  1. Submit a graduation application and fee by the required date.
  2. Be admitted to candidacy upon completion of 18 semester hours; see requirements under "Candidacy."
  3. Complete all requirements of the curricula.
  4. Maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  5. Repeat courses with grades of C.
  6. Make up dissertation hours with a grade of "U."
  7. Complete successfully a symposium presentation. Symposium presentation or any part thereof may be repeated only once.
  8. Satisfy all financial obligations to the University.

To participate in commencement, Ed.D. students must complete ALL requirements. Full payment for binding of all dissertations ordered must be paid in order to participate in commencement.

Ed.D.: Leadership and Professional Practice

Program of Study – Ed.D. in Leadership and Professional Practice

The Program of Study is a list of required courses offered. Course substitutions or transfer hours are not allowed. The 57-semester hour program requires a minimum of three years (36 months) for completion. No transfer credit is accepted in the Ed.D. Program. The University is not obligated to any student who becomes disenrolled for any reason. Failure to follow course sequence will result in delayed graduation date and significant financial penalty. The Ed.D. courses are taught in multiple formats (i.e. face-to-face, hybrid, and online).

Academic Focus

During the first summer of the Ed.D. program, each candidate will complete a form identifying an area of interest relating to the topic chosen for the dissertation. Choices include: Administrative Leadership; Professoriate; Business Administration; Corporate Development; Curriculum and Instruction; Higher Education; Mental Health; Non-Profit Organizations; Nursing Education; Religious Leadership; Teacher Leadership; Technology; Teaching and Learning; or another area submitted and approved by the Ed.D. Director. The areas of interest chosen will be the candidate's area of focus in course work, especially EDU 7008 and EDU 7010.

EDU 7001

Theories, Structures, and Systems I

4

EDU 7002

Scientifically Based Practice: Research I (hybrid)

4

EDU 7003

Strategic Policy and Planning

3

EDU 7004

Scientifically Based Practice: Research II

4

EDU 7005

Transformational Learning

3

EDU 7006

Cultural Influences

3

EDU 7008

Literature Review

3

EDU 7010

Professional Practice and Research

3

EDU 7011

Theories, Structures, and Systems II

4

EDU 7051

Intrapersonal Effectiveness

4

EDU 7052

Collaborative Teamwork and Team Development

4

EDU 7053

Creating Effective Organizations

4

EDU 7151

Technology

2

EDU 7152

Technology-Based Statistics I

2

EDU 7154

Technology-Based Statistics II

2

EDU 7201 - 7209

Dissertation

12

TOTAL HOURS

57

The Ed.D. program is built on specific competencies:

EDU 7001 Part I: Participants demonstrate the ability to think with leadership and organizational theory in order to understand practical situations and make better decisions. Additional competencies selected by the student based on a personal action plan.

EDU 7002: Participants demonstrate an understanding and application of the elements required to present an academic rationale for a quality research project.

EDU 7003: Participants understand and demonstrate the various components in planning and developing a strategic policy.

EDU 7004: Participants demonstrate an understanding and application of research design including qualitative and quantitative.

EDU 7005: Participants conceptualize quality instructional environments.

EDU 7006: Participants reflect on one's own frame or lens through which we view diversity and develop a training manual applicable to leadership in various types of organizations.

EDU 7008: Participants demonstrate the ability to gather, annotate, organize, and present a broad scope of theoretical, empirical, and practical literature in support of a research topic.

EDU 7010: Participants conduct a meta-analysis on ethical, power, and future issues related to their dissertation topic and develop and understanding of how these issues relate to their personal leadership.

EDU 7011 Part II: Participants demonstrate the ability to think with leadership and organizational theory in order to understand practical situations and make better decisions. Additional competencies selected by the student based on a personal action plan.

EDU 7051: Participants demonstrate self-awareness and the desire and ability to continually improve in the defined areas of personal management.

EDU 7052 Participants demonstrate the skill of facilitating a team-based organization or learning culture.

EDU 7053: Participants demonstrate the ability to design, implement, and evaluate total system optimization.

EDU 7151: Participants successfully acquire skills to use technology to support academic pursuits.

EDU 7152 Part I: Participants understand the tests that are appropriate for their dissertations and successfully use SPSS to input and analyze their data, correctly reporting the results and drawing scholarly conclusions.

EDU 7154 Part II: Participants understand the tests that are appropriate for their dissertations and successfully use SPSS to input and analyze their data, correctly reporting the results and drawing scholarly conclusions.

EDU 7201 - 7209: Participants demonstrate the ability to conceive, plan, execute, and report a quality research study.

Intensified Summer Learning Experience (ISLE)

During the three summer sessions of intensified learning experiences, candidates are required to participate with peers and faculty members in scholarly and innovative activities. These learning experiences include both day and evening sessions.

All doctoral candidates are required to reside in University residence halls during the summer sessions. There are no exceptions to this residence requirement. Attendance in classes and all other scheduled activities are mandatory. Failure to comply with ISLE requirements will likely result in dismissal from the program.

In addition to tuition for courses, other fees are assessed for participation in ISLE.

Dissertation

The dissertation is a major research endeavor of a significant issue related to professional practice. The dissertation involves identification of a problem, development of appropriate protocol, implementation and analysis of both qualitative and quantitative research, dissertation defense, and a symposium presentation of the student's work and findings. The dissertation is designed to equip the student to engage in scientifically based inquiry and practice to effect problem identification and solutions in the environment of educational practice.

The dissertation experience begins in the first semester of the doctoral program and ends with a culminating experience that includes a defense with the candidate's dissertation team and a symposium presentation.

Candidates must earn a grade of "S" to identify them as making satisfactory progress on the dissertation project each semester. A grade of "U" identifies the candidate as not making satisfactory progress. Any dissertation course with an earned grade of "U" must be made up the following semester along with the normal course load already expected to be taken. A candidate who earns a grade of "U" in two consecutive dissertation courses is automatically terminated from the program. A candidate who earns a grade of "U" in three dissertation courses is automatically terminated from the program. Additional details regarding the dissertation may be found in the Dissertation Research Manual. A grade of Incomplete may be given for extenuating circumstances and must be cleared within a brief, specified period of time as determined by the Ed.D. Director.

Doctoral Council

The graduate department of the School of Education includes a doctoral council comprised of experienced faculty and administrators in the University who work collaboratively to be creative and to promote intellectual stimulation through the field-based experience format and design.

A primary responsibility of the doctoral council is to consider recommendations for advisers and readers as presented by the Ed.D. Director and to approve the dissertation team for each doctoral student. The Council approves topics, reviews and modifies procedures and policies and provides training for dissertation teams. The doctoral council meets at least once per semester.

Graduate Courses

Course Descriptions

EDU 5005 Introduction to Online Teaching (3)

A course that examines the role of the online instructor in a highly interactive, fully online, e-learning program. Emphasis is placed on developing the online learning community; building the skills to effectively employ online learning strategies; managing the online class; and implementing new or modifying existing curricula.

EDU 515C Culture, Ideas, and Values (3)

Requiring considerable independent work, students investigate significant research with emphasis on instructional leadership, the educational change process, and other current educational influences. Candidates critique materials selected and orally present their synthesizing of research findings.

EDU 550C Curriculum: Design and Practice (3)

An exploration of the content that revolves around the development of the curriculum, this course includes curriculum analyses, models, alignment, and evaluation.

EDU 551C Psychological Foundations of Learning (3)

Addresses developmental stages within the context of major learning theories. The psychology of learning includes motivation, humor, strategic learning, anchored instruction, mediated learning, metacognition, brain research, classroom organization, management, climate, and communication for effective teaching.

EDU 552C Assessment for Excellence (3)

Models of assessment are examined to determine measures of student performance. These include authentic assessment, competency-based assessment, assessment instruments, and assessment reports. Emphasis is given to accountability, data-driven instruction, and current trends in assessment.

EDU 553C Technology for Learning (3)

Formerly Technology: Today and Tomorrow –This course focuses on using e-mail, word processing, databases, and spreadsheets to support instruction. Internet resources, interactive media, and Web page design are also examined. Hands-on laboratory experiences develop an understanding of the power of technology to assist in the teaching and learning process.

EDU 554C Instructional Design (3)

Formerly Paradigms of Planning –Emphasizing the decision-making process, this course is a survey of instructional models for teaching including planning, delivery, strategies, grouping, themes, and resources. Differentiated learning, including learning domains, teaching and learning styles, and multiple intelligences as well as evaluation of student performance and parental involvement are essential components of this course.

EDU 555C Issues and Trends in Teaching and Learning (3)

Addresses issues of philosophical importance including historical influences, diversity, educational theorists, family and society, health, and physical and emotional safety in schools. The correlates of effective schools will be emphasized.

EDU 556C Research into Practice (3)

Participants study conceptualization of research problems, development of hypotheses and strategies, and the use of quantitative and qualitative research, research into practice, problem-solving, and applied educational research.

EDU 568C Legal, Ethical and Diversity Issues in Education (3)

Candidates will be challenged to examine the facts, delve into the causes, and reflect on the impact of various legal, ethical and diversity issues faced by today's educators. Identifying and addressing legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers for their students will be central to this course. The impact of the U.S. Constitution with a focus on the Bill of Rights will be a significant part of the class discourse. Constitutional influences in the context of the religious, moral and ethical responsibilities in school decision-making will be explored. The implications of major court decisions, local, state and national (NCLB) laws and policies that directly impact schools, teachers, students and parents will be an essential component of the class dialogue. Another major component of this class will involve an exploration of the various diversity issues that are an inherent part of school life, i.e. religion, culture, ethnicity, and special needs.

EDU 6001 Practicum A for School Leaders (1)

Practicum experience conducted during the first semester of the program. Orientation occurs on Trevecca's campus early in the semester of admission to the program. Specifically, candidates are expected to develop a resume, write a personal mission statement, and familiarize themselves with various aspects of school governance and the duties of school officials. Observation of and interaction with school leader(s) are required.

EDU 6002 Practicum B for School Leaders (1)

Practicum experience conducted during the second semester of the program. Orientation occurs at the primary site of classes (campus or off-campus) early in the second semester. Specifically, candidates are expected to focus on employment processes/practices in their school system/school, the delivery of professional development, and organizational climate. Observation of and interaction with school leader(s) are expected.

EDU 6003 Practicum C for School Leaders (1)

Practicum experience conducted during the third semester of the program. Orientation occurs at the primary site of classes (campus or off-campus) early in the third semester. Specifically, candidates are expected to develop an understanding of curriculum, standards, assessment, and best teaching practices. Furthermore, candidates are expected to explore issues related to the legal, ethical, and political contexts of schools. Observation of and interaction with school leader(s), along with community and/or person(s) or ethnic and social diversity, are expected.

EDU 6004 Practicum D for School Leaders (1)

Practicum experience conducted during the last semester of the program. Specifically, candidates are expected to develop an understanding of data, data analysis, school effectiveness analysis, and strategies that have proven to improve student performance and build an effective school improvement plan. Candidates are further expected to write a diversity plan for a school and explore issues associated with the growing pluralism and diversity of American schools. Observation or and interaction with school leader(s), along with community leader(s) and/or person(s) of ethnic and social diversity are expected.

EDU 6010 Leadership for Instructional Effectiveness (3)

Candidates differentiate between administration, management, and leadership within the school setting. The roles of the local, state, and federal levels of government are considered and the duties of school superintendents (directors), school boards, principals, assistant principals are delineated. Current issues facing schools, including performance-based standards and student achievement, are presented. Attention is given to the historical context of American education. Candidates are expected to reflect on their professional goals and mission.

EDU 6015 Technology for Instructional Leaders (3)

Candidates examine the role of school leaders in managing and supporting technology to maximize student learning and to increase the efficiency of school operations; various models of technology are explored. Candidates learn to access data effectively, using various models of technology to support teams of teachers, students, and parents to lead to academic success for students.

EDU 6020 Decision Making for Instructional Improvement (3)

Candidates examine organizational mission, strategic planning, and core beliefs as key elements within the school framework. The role of the school leaders in establishing a vision, a sense of community, and a positive learning culture that facilitates student achievement is explored; models used by effective school leaders are presented. Attention is also focused on teacher recruitment, induction, professional development, and personnel evaluation systems - both formative and summative. The use of data in assessing student learning is emphasized.

EDU 6025 Using Research and Data for Improved Student Learning (3)

Candidates use current research from multiple sources to analyze and improve the learning community. Areas of interest include student learning, effective teaching, connecting student and community resources, analyzing problems, interpreting data, and understanding student growth and academic development. The role of educators, especially school leaders, as the consumers of research data is emphasized.

EDU 6030 Curriculum for Instructional Leaders (3)

Candidates integrate information gathered from research, reports, assessments, standards, surveys, and best practices into effective leadership of the instructional program. Within the structure of local and state requirements, the methods and processes for understanding and implementing this information into an effective instructional program at the school level are explored and defined.

EDU 6035 Law, Ethics, and Politics for School Leaders (3)

Candidates examine the legal and regulatory mandates as outlined by the local school district, the state, the federal government, and the courts. Emphasis is on the legal rights and responsibilities of teachers, administrators, and students. Additional emphasis is placed on the following: political influences and implications, moral and ethical responsibilities of schools, special education laws, and school finance procedures.

EDU 6040 Valuing Diversity for School Effectiveness (3)

Candidates address the diversity that affects education locally, nationally, and globally. The course includes responding to diversity for the improvement of instruction, for increased student learning, and for a positive school climate, specifically in these areas: ethnicity/race, socioeconomic, gender, exceptionalities, language, religion, and urban/suburban/rural. The social context of the school within the broader community is emphasized.

EDU 6045 Assessing Learning for School Improvement (3)

Candidates focus on the principles, strategies, and techniques utilized to enhance both organizational effectiveness and student learning. Through an in-depth study of the characteristics of an effective learning organization, candidates will acquire the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and dispositions to lead successfully a school to achieve increased student learning.

EDU 6050 Summative Assessment Seminar for School Leaders (2)

Candidates for the master's degree and those candidates seeking endorsement are required to participate in this non-credit, culminating activity of their program. Candidates present a summary of their instructional improvement project to a panel comprised of faculty, district and/or building-level school leaders. Candidates will present individually. Successful completion is determined by the panel of faculty and school leaders.

EDU 6075 Diversity in Classrooms and Schools (2)

Provides an overview of the diverse educational needs, challenges, opportunities, and rewards that teachers encounter as they seek to effectively meet the needs of learners in diverse classrooms and schools. Candidates will examine diversity research on topics such as socioeconomics, exceptionalities, race and ethnicity, linguistics, learning styles, and genders. A focus will be on the at-risk student and equipping students with tools to make choices. Candidates will be equipped with tools and instructional strategies to effectively create learning opportunities and a positive classroom environment that fosters student achievement.

EDU 6080 Interdisciplinary Teaching (3)

Examines strategies to effectively support interdisciplinary instruction and assessment to address the complex challenges of providing quality instruction to a class of diverse learners. Candidates will explore interdisciplinary curriculum and learn effective strategies integrating all content areas for enhanced instruction. The focus will be on individuals with visual impairments both in a specialized classroom and in a full inclusion environment.

EDU 6085 Differentiated Teaching (3)

Examines strategies to effectively support differentiated instruction and assessment to address the complex challenges of providing quality instruction to a class of diverse learners. Focuses on providing students with multiple options for learning and applying information and expressing what they learn. Candidates will explore the research on differentiated instruction and learn effective strategies for managing flexible groups, providing students with a variety of options to maximize learning, and planning strategically for classroom management issues. The focus will be on individuals with visual impairments both in a specialized classroom and in a full inclusion environment.

EDU 610A Educational Issues (1–3)

A survey of current issues in education, this course is designed for the advanced graduate student. A seminar format may be utilized as the instructional technique.

EDU 6125 Evaluation and Training of Educators (3)

Based on current, historical evaluation, the course includes analysis of techniques, review of diagnostic and prescriptive measures, differentiated salaries, and higher education/teacher training.

EDU 6300 Cultural-Educational Experience (1-3)

Participants travel abroad to engage in educational and varied cultural experiences for assessing and enhancing educational programs.

EDU 6310 Research I: Thesis Development (2)

Exploration and development of the thesis and literature review for an action research project focusing on a current topic in education.

EDU 6315 Research II: Implementation (1)

Finalize research design and implementation of the action research project.

EDU 6320 Research III: Data Collection and Analysis (1)

The teacher candidate will complete the research project, prepare a final document, and give an oral presentation of the research.

EDU 6360 Legal, Ethical, and Cultural Competencies (3)

Examines public school law as it affects teachers' rights and legal responsibilities to students and their families. Content will include an examination of students' legal rights and ethical parameters of teaching and common sense practices to direct/inform the teacher. Content to build cultural competency including but not limited to English learners, race and ethnicity, and gender will be studied and applied. Applicable state, federal, and case law affecting schools is reviewed.

EDU 6370 Instructional Technologies (3)

Examines how technology can facilitate 7-12 instructional practices. Candidates will explore instructional software, online resources, and synchronous and asynchronous methods in technology mediation. Mixed media input will be demonstrated and practiced as well as various instructional methods using technology such as the Internet for instruction and various forms of distance education.

EDU 6400 Financial Planning for Educators (3)

Investment strategies and retirement vehicles are explored, such as company retirement plans, stock market, mutual funds, certificates of deposit, annuities, trusts, income tax, social security, personal business, and real estate. This course is designed to prepare the educator to make decisions that will allow financial independence.

EDU 6410 Residency I (6)

As an emerging elementary teacher, the candidate will be placed in an internship with a community public school partner. The candidate will be engaged in planning, teaching, and assessing students for optimal learning.

EDU 6415 Residency II (6)

As an emerging teacher, the candidate will be placed in an internship with a community public school partner. The candidate will be engaged in planning, teaching, and assessing students for optimal learning.

EDU 6450 Social Justice in the Community (2)

Investigating student development and learning in a non-school community program. Candidates will explore the unique social challenges in urban environments other than the typical public school setting. Embedded field study.

EDU 6455 Transformational Learning Environments (2)

Creating an invitational and supportive classroom for optimal learning in the urban setting. The candidate will develop a proactive program of classroom management that demonstrates increased student engagement and achievement.

EDU 6460 Intensive Literacy and Assessment (3)

Explores the diagnostic and subsequent remediation of common literacy challenges. The candidate will develop a research based understanding of the design, delivery, diagnosis, and assessment of reading domain. Emphasis will be in the areas of Special Education and English Learners.

EDU 6465 Current Diversity Issues (3)

Explores the impact of diversities on school communities. Candidates will develop knowledge and awareness, and seek to answer questions related to diversity. The teacher candidate will identify and match instructional plans to the cognitive, social, linguist, cultural, emotional, and physical needs.

EDU 6500 Classroom Organization and Management for Urban Educators (3)

Provides a proactive program of classroom management that has demonstrated increases in student appropriate and on-task behavior and in student achievement. The primary goal is to help teachers improve their overall instructional and behavioral management skills through planning, implementing, modeling, and maintaining effective classroom practices for both experienced and beginning teachers. Candidates are required to complete ten hours of community service in an ethnically diverse setting.

EDU 6506 Effective Leadership (3)

Designed to assist the participant in understanding the problems faced by leaders in schools and communities. Topics include accepted theories, principles and techniques of effective leadership, the role of personal values, and the role of the leader in current reform and restructuring.

EDU 6507 Research and Practices in School Administration (3)

Includes topics: bureaucracy and the school, the role of professionals, schools and their external environments, character of work groups, dimensions of leadership, and methods for making decisions.

EDU 6700 Quality Curriculum and Instructional Practice (3)

Focuses on the assessment of quality curriculum and instructional practices. Candidates will demonstrate instructional strategies, inquiry based learning, organizational skills, and the integration of technology. They will also engage in using methodologies for monitoring, assessing, and supporting quality instruction with teachers whom they are coaching. This course has a required practicum of 30 clock hours: EDU 6705 Practicum Focusing on Staff Development (1).

EDU 6705 Practicum Focusing on Staff Development (1)

Provides hands-on learning experience in environments in collaboration with practicing school educators. Assessment feedback will be included from course instructors in EDU 6700 and EDU 6710. Emphasis is placed on instructional strategies, curriculum, and the integration of technology.

EDU 6710 Technology Integration in Teaching and Learning (3)

Focuses on integrating technology into instructional content.Candidates will experience merging technologies, Web 2.0, and classroom hardware/software. They will also develop instructional technology and technology presentation skills. Candidates will use technologies for instructional improvement that will include consideration of candidate achievement data, research, technology plans, and community relations.

EDU 6715 Leadership Styles and Beliefs (3)

Allows teacher leaders to examine leadership styles and beliefs of themselves and others for effective school improvement. Topics include: understanding how ethics shape decisions and practices, how legal issues impact the school, how to build leadership teams and provide effective assistance to teachers, and how to develop and evaluate program effectiveness. Also, this course will explore effective practices of creating, maintaining, and facilitating professional learning communities in schools and districts.

EDU 6720 Action Research for School Improvement (3)

The candidate will identify an area for instructional improvement, refine strategies for investigating a defined issue, initiate effective instructional decision making, and work towards a project that will effect a positive change in the classroom. Assessment philosophies and methodologies inform the overarching framework for this course. The course will be in conjunction with EDU 6725.

EDU 6725 Data Analysis for School Improvement (3)

The candidate will collect and analyze data from multiple sources for development of an Action Research Project. The emphasis will be on making data driven decisions for improving student achievement through instructional practices. This course is taken in conjunction with EDU 6720.

EDU 6730 Practicum Focusing on School Improvement Planning (1)

Provides hands-on learning experiences in conducting action research. Assessment feedback will be included from both course instructors of EDU 6725 and EDU 6720. An emphasis is placed on a candidate developed action research project.

EDU 6735 Effective Classroom Environments for Teaching and Learning (3)

Focuses on strategies for assisting teachers with effective planning, organizing, and managing an effective classroom environment. Candidates will use research, classroom visits, and other collaborative opportunities to demonstrate for mentees effective classroom strategies in time management, classroom management, and instructional planning.

EDU 6740 Inclusive Practices in Teaching and Learning (3)

Focuses on the impact of economic disparities within neighborhoods and predicts the impact on local schools. Areas of emphasis will include: differentiated instruction, special education, inclusionary practices, legal and ethical issues, and community relations. The goal is to identify instructional and assessment practices that promote equity in the classroom.

EDU 6745 Mentoring Strategies (3)

Focuses on the research base for high quality mentoring. Candidates will acquire an understanding of what constitutes mentoring: building relationships, building trust, and classroom management strategies. The emphasis will be on understanding both the theory and practice of mentoring. Candidates will demonstrate mentoring strategies, facilitate collaborative strategies in the educational setting, and identify means to assist mentees in self-assessment of teaching and in evaluation of student learning. This course along with EDU 6850 requires a practicum of 30 clock hours: EDU 6750 Practicum Focuses on Mentoring/Coaching.

EDU 6750 Practicum Focusing on Mentoring/Coaching (1)

Provides hands on learning experience in environments under the guidance of practicing school educators. Candidates will maintain several activities and submit a reflection paper for each practicum course. Assessment feedback will be included from both cooperating teachers and course instructors.

EDU 6760 Exit Assessment/E-Portfolio (0)

Candidates will maintain a working portfolio throughout their program. Included in the portfolio will be the Action Research Project from EDU 6720 and 6725 and assigned exhibits from other courses.

Portfolios will be presented at the conclusion of the program of study.

EDU 6770 Leading Curricular Change (3)

Focuses on research and best practices that facilitate curriculum development. Standards will be analyzed regarding their impact on curriculum development. Candidates will investigate curriculum change; network and make learning links with diverse colleagues; investigate how to develop high quality curriculum; learn about the impact that transforming a curriculum can have in raising the quality of teaching and learning and in improving outcomes for students. The candidate will discover the process of how leading change involves, including the role of distributed leadership.

EDU 6775 Practicum Best Practices in Curriculum and Instruction (1)

Provides hands on learning experience in environments under the guidance of practicing school educators. Candidates will maintain several activities and submit a reflection paper for each practicum course. Assessment feedback will be included from both cooperating teachers and course instructors.

EDU 6800 Exit Assessment/ E-Portfolio (0)

Beginning with the first course of CAI, the e-portfolio will be a work in progress for the duration of the program. This collection of work will include the results of the Action Research Project. The e-portfolio will serve as the culminating activity and is required for completion of the CAI program. A Pass-Fail grading system will be used.

EDU 6805 Exemplary Leader Residency (0)

During the fall semesters, grant candidates - mentors in training - will be residents in MNPS schools and serve as collaborators to improve student achievement and increase teacher efficacy. Candidates will work daily during the regular school calendar year within their assigned high priority elementary schools as part of a collaborative team. Candidates will provide both mentoring, assistance, and direction in the creation and establishment of Professional Learning Communities within the school, focused on the specific needs of the schools. Based on these specific needs, the candidate team will identify and implement an action research project. To build the learning community, program candidates and University faculty will participate in reflective seminars. Candidates will maintain journals of their work with teachers and principals and will share their residency experiences in these sessions. The purpose of this professional discourse will be to identify problems and collaboratively seek solutions.

EDU 6810 Exemplary Leader Residency (0)

During the fall and spring semesters, grant candidates - mentors in training - will be residents in MNPS schools and serve as collaborators to improve student achievement and increase teacher efficacy. Candidates will work daily during the regular school calendar year within their assigned high priority elementary schools as part of a collaborative team. Candidates will provide both mentoring, assistance, and direction in the creation and establishment of Professional Learning Communities within the school, focused on the specific needs of the schools. Based on these specific needs, the candidate team will identify and implement an action research project. To build the learning community, program candidates and University faculty will participate in reflective seminars. Candidates will maintain journals of their work with teachers and principals and will share their residency experiences in these sessions. The purpose of this professional discourse will be to identify problems and collaboratively seek solutions.

EDU 6830 Curriculum Planning and Instructional Practice (3)

Focuses on the assessment of quality curriculum and instructional practices. Candidates will demonstrate instructional strategies, inquiry based learning, organizational skills, and the integration of technology. They will also engage in using methodologies for monitoring, assessing, and supporting quality instruction.

EDU 6835 Practicum Focusing on Educational Collaboration and Staff Development (1)

Provides hands-on learning experiences in environments in collaboration with practicing school educators. Assessment feedback will be included from course instructors in EDU 6830 and EDU 6710. Emphasis is placed on instructional strategies and the integration of technology.

EDU 6840 Creating Effective Classroom Environments for Instruction (3)

Focuses on planning, organizing, and managing an effective classroom environment. Candidates will research and investigate collaborative opportunities in time, classroom, and instructional management.

EDU 6845 Practicum Best Practices in Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction (1)

Provides hands-on learning experiences in effective classroom environments, inclusive practices, and leading curricular change. Assessment feedback will be included from all course instructors from EDU 6840, EDU 6740, and EDU 6770.

EDU 6850 Coaching Strategies for Teacher Leaders (3)

Focuses on the research base for high quality coaching. Students will develop an understanding of what constitutes effective coaching: cognitive coaching, coaching models, building trust and relationships, and classroom management. The emphasis will be on understanding the theory of coaching and its practical applications in today's schools. This course will also focus on the practice of coaching. Candidates will demonstrate coaching strategies that facilitate collaborative strategies in the educational setting, and identify means to assist teachers in self-assessment of teaching as it relates to evaluation of student learning. This course and EDU 6745 Mentoring Strategies will have a required practicum of 30 hours: EDU 6750, Practicum Focusing on Mentoring/Coaching teachers in public and non-public schools.

EDU 6900 Numeracy Specialists K-8 (3)

Designed for coaches of K-8 teachers to build those skills, understandings, and dispositions required to be numeracy leaders in K-8 schools. The focus is to provide numeracy leaders with research, resources, strategies, and practice to equip them to work with adult learners in deepening their understanding of mathematics content pedagogy and strengthening their skills to improve instruction so all students can learn.

EDU 6905 Numeracy Specialists 6 - 12 (3)

Designed for coaches of 6-12 teachers to build those skills, understandings, and dispositions required to be numeracy leaders in 6-12 schools. The focus is to provide numeracy leaders with research, resources, strategies, and practice to equip them to work with adult learners in deepening their understanding of mathematics content pedagogy and strengthening their skills to improve instruction so all students can learn.

EDU 6910 Coaching Algebra and Geometry Teachers (3)

Focuses on developing understandings, dispositions, and skills needed by coaches to help elementary, middle, and secondary teachers develop the concepts and skills of teaching algebra and geometry. The intent is to provide research, resources, and practice to equip numeracy leaders to work with adult learners in deepening their understanding of algebraic and geometric concepts and pedagogy and strengthening their skills to teach concepts so all students can learn. It is planned for this course to be co-taught by two faculty members, one with background teaching at the elementary level and the other with secondary experience.

EDU 6915 Analysis and Correction of Math Learning Problems (3)

Develops expertise in analyzing student work, diagnosing the problem, understanding student thinking, and using that understanding to guide subsequent interactions and interventions with the student. Participants will analyze student learning through formal and informal assessments, and learn how to use research and current resources to diagnose mathematical learning problems, and how to choose and implement the best interventions to increase student learning.

EDU 7001 Theories, Structures, and Systems I (4)

Explores best practices that have been identified to assist in the establishment of organizations. Evidence-based foundations are used to focus on those best practices that foster continuous quality improvement in schooling, and rethinking the connections in the relationships of stakeholders through the formulation of problem-solving teams that can approach quality through collaboration and scientifically-based practice. An enhanced linkage among stakeholders is encouraged and emphasized as a result of evidence-based exploration of best practices.

EDU 7002 Scientifically Based Practice: Research I (4)

Introduces the doctoral candidate to the principles of both qualitative and quantitative research and the paradigm of an evidence-based approach to academic research as well as consumer-based problem solving. Research design, ethics, data analysis, and techniques such as survey, issue and trend analysis, case study, historical research, pre-and post-testing, literature review, meta-analysis, psychographic methods, and quantitative data collection and statistical analysis are emphasized. This course establishes the candidate's basic understanding of academic research while fostering comfort with the utilization of scientifically based practice to approach problem-solving needs within the professional environment.

EDU 7003 Strategic Policy and Planning (3)

Studies the roles of churches, organizations, institutions, and teams in planning and implementation strategies. An evidence-based foundation encourages the candidate to use scientifically based practice to improve efficiency. Holistic and integrated strategies are implemented to guide candidates in investigating policy and planning to achieve visions and high organizational performance.

EDU 7004 Scientifically Based Practice: Research II (4)

Extends the depth of study in research established in Scientifically Based Practice: Research I. An emphasis is placed on methodology, research design, statistical analysis, and data reporting. An efficient use of technology for all phases of the dissertation is employed by the candidate in the completion of this course.

EDU 7005 Transformational Learning (3)

Examines the multiple facets associated with both andragogical and pedagogical change from the fundamental conceptualization of the design phase through the implementation phase. A meaningful learning experience is emphasized along with the capture of teachable moments and the culmination phase of evaluation and revision. The candidate is expected to use evidence-based practice to form the pillars of a learning experience, evaluation, and revision for improvement.

EDU 7006 Cultural Influences (3)

Engages a thorough study of the multiple elements that impact learning: conflict, cultural groupings, discrimination, ethnicity, ethnocentrism, fragmentation, prejudice, bias, stereotyping, the role of culture in people's lives, and other elements that influence beliefs, values, and decisions are investigated. The candidate is given an opportunity to expand personally and professionally through an evidence-based examination of how culture influences the workplace.

EDU 7008 Literature Review (3)

Literature Review affords the doctoral candidate the opportunity to increase literature review skills by defining research questions, learning and using search strategies, engaging in synoptical reading, organizing resources, and outlining an in-depth, scholarly literature review. The course also provides the candidate with the opportunity to advance his or her depth of knowledge in the dissertation topic. The candidate will prepare an annotated bibliography and a detailed outline of the literature review on the candidate's chosen dissertation topic.

EDU 7010 Professional Practice and Research (3)

Within the context of a candidate's professional practices, s/he will focus on an issue of interest. Candidates will conduct a meta-analysis of research, and explore the future of the field and the ethical issues in his/her area of interest. Candidates will reflect on the research and explorations and delineate the knowledge and abilities critical for a changing world.

EDU 7011 Theories, Structures, and Systems II (2)

Explores best practices that have been identified to assist in the establishment of organizations. Evidence-based foundations are used to focus on those best practices that foster continuous quality improvement in schooling, and rethinking the connections in the relationships of stakeholders through the formulation of problem-solving teams that can approach quality through collaboration and scientifically-based practice. An enhanced linkage among stakeholders is encouraged and emphasized as a result of evidence-based exploration of best practices.

EDU 7051 Intrapersonal Effectiveness (4)

The first in a three-part series, this course examines the four levels of leadership: personal, interpersonal, managerial, and organizational. The focus of part one is to apply an evidence-based approach to examine the theories of individual motivation and behavior. Candidates analyze their personal character and competence as leaders, with the goal of maximizing their personal effectiveness. Candidates are encouraged to develop a habit of scientifically based practice of continual examination of their own effectiveness and use of their evidence-based learning to effect personal improvement.

EDU 7052 Collaborative Teamwork and Team Development (4)

Building on the foundation laid in EDU 7051, this course is an extension from study of individual behavior and effectiveness to analysis of group or team behavior and leadership effectiveness. A collaborative team-based learning culture is utilized to simulate real-life problems and team-building processes. Course topics include: leadership dimensions, team learning, development and management, diversity, and organizational analysis and development. An evidence-based foundation is employed to support student learning and exposure to best practices expressed by recognized leaders in team building concepts.

EDU 7053 Creating Effective Organizations (4)

The culmination of individual behavior/effectiveness and team behavior / effectiveness, this course provides the candidate a comprehensive understanding of the way in which total organizational effectiveness is conceptualized, measured, and realized in practice. The course also explores the ways change associated with organizational improvement is effectively managed. It assists practitioners in understanding how quality improvement can be initialized, managed, and sustained at all levels within the organization to achieve total value-added improvement. An evidence-based foundation is employed through exposure to best practices and the concepts of recognized leaders in organizational leadership and improvement.

EDU 7151 Technology (2)

Assists the candidate in learning the uses of technology that facilitate the completion of the doctoral dissertation. Elements may include word processing, databases, spreadsheets, internet, project management software, web pages, and other appropriate applications. It is additionally used as a platform for the candidate to begin exploring the information available so as to begin a habit of seeking evidence-based data in the employment of scientifically based practice within the professional environment.

EDU 7152 Technology-Based Statistics I (2)

Designed to equip candidates to incorporate statistical analysis into educational research. The different types of data and the tests appropriate for each are discussed and practiced. Successful completion of this course enables candidates to analyze their data gathered for dissertations and to draw definite conclusions from their data. Additionally, candidates in the evidence-based educational environment are equipped to review the methodology and data generated by scientifically based research and draw useful and reliable conclusions from that data.

EDU 7154 Technology-Based Statistics II (2)

Designed to equip candidates to incorporate statistical analysis into educational research. The different types of data and the tests appropriate for each are discussed and practiced. Successful completion of this course enables candidates to analyze their data gathered for dissertations and to draw definite conclusions from their data. Additionally, candidates in the evidence-based educational environment are equipped to review the methodology and data generated by scientifically based research and draw useful and reliable conclusions from that data.

EDU 7201 through 7209 Dissertation (1 - 18)

The dissertation is a major research study based on a significant issue within the workplace. The dissertation must engage a field of interest and involves identification of a problem, development of appropriate protocol, implementation and analysis of both qualitative and quantitative research, dissertation defense, and a capstone presentation of the candidate's work and findings. The dissertation is designed to equip the candidate to engage scientifically based inquiry and practice to effect problem identification and solutions in the environment of workplace. EDU 7201, 7202, 7203, 7204, 7207, 7208 1 credit each. EDU 7205, 7206 2 credits each. If candidates do not make Satisfactory grades in the courses, they will have to repeat the dissertation courses until the dissertation has been successfully completed and defended.

ELL 6000 Language Acquisition and Learning (3)

Explores the accepted theories of language learning and acquisition. The distinction is made between learning and acquisition as it relates to efficient language application and use. Distinctions are also made between communicative language learning and academic language learning and the instructional supports required for each. This is an applied theory course with significant reading and which provides a theoretical framework for the remainder of the course work in this major. Understanding how language is learned and acquired is fundamental to language instruction. The importance of socialization in the target language with transitional supports in the mother tongue is also explored.

ELL 6005 Language Acquisition and Authentic Language Curriculum (3)

Includes theories of language learning and acquisition. Distinction is made between learning and acquisition as it relates to efficient language application and use. Considers curriculum design in relation to language learning within an authentic learning environment. Curriculum will be designed within authentic language context integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing. Integrates cultural understanding and the use of technology for learning.

ELL 6010 Trends, Models, and Methods in ELL Instruction (3)

Examines the currently used models of ELL instruction from a variety of school boards and regions. These models are examined in light of language learning theory. Models of integration, inclusion and other models of differentiated instruction are examined and students are expected to not only understand the differences but to also understand the implications for effective language learning.

ELL 6020 Authentic Language Curriculum Design (3)

Considers the principles of curriculum design as they relate to language learning within an authentic learning environment. Rather than creating inaccurate learning environments with controlled language input, this course explores the efficiency of maximizing comprehensible input in order to produce comprehensible output. Contextualization of language application and use are central to this course and candidates will be expected to design actual curriculum units within an authentic language context. Integrated approaches to grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing are examined and used by candidates to design their own authentic language course.

ELL 6030 Culture (3)

Focuses on the relationship between culture and language, both oral and written, and examines the importance of identifying key cultural traits of ELL students' home culture for instructional scaffolding. Affirmation of home culture as well as multicultural issues such as integration, acculturation and assimilation are examined as they pertain to ELL teaching and learning. This is a research course.

ELL 6040 Methods of Assessment and Evaluation for ELL (3)

Language proficiency assessment for placing is not the same as evaluation of language demonstration and use. This course examines the differences between the two and combines methods with outcomes evaluation. Assessment for "placement" is compared with evaluation of outcomes. Placement is also examined in light of authentic language learning within a school setting. Candidates are expected to understand the various methods as well as produce samples of assessment and evaluation strategies.

ELL 6050 Technology and Language Learning (3)

Examines the importance of instructional scaffolding for ELL learners and looks at how new technology can facilitate this approach. Candidates experience various methods using new technology such as the Internet for instruction and various forms of distance education for language learners. This course provides access to new software, online resources, and synchronous and asynchronous methods in technology mediation. Language practice through mixed media input is demonstrated as well as the role of rote practice for pronunciation.

ELL 6055 Linguistics for Teachers of English Language Learners (3)

A descriptive linguistics course which focuses on understanding phonologic, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of language as they apply to an understanding of any ELL student's native language. Language transfer issues for ELL students are examined in both the oral and written domains to provide appropriate instructional scaffolding. The course also considers the significance of sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic aspects of language learning. This is a research course.

ELL 6065 Review for PRAXIS Test (0)

Review for the PRAXIS test.

ELL 6600 E-Portfolio (0)

The e-portfolio, a web-based electronic tool provided to candidates at the beginning of the program, is considered a work in progress throughout the graduate library program. This web-based electronic tool provides the candidate powerful resources for reflecting, synthesizing, and evaluating course experiences during the duration of the program. Candidates are provided a course syllabus and framework for completing the e-portfolio. This e-portfolio will be presented during the final semester of the program and is required for graduation. A pass/fail grading system will be used.

ETM 5010 Introduction to Educational Technology (3)

Focuses on developing proficiency in the foundational skills necessary for the master of education in technology PreK-12. Working in face-to-face, synchronous, and asynchronous environments, candidates develop skills necessary for competency in word processing, database, spreadsheet, presentation, and Internet applications. The course includes an overview of the use and management of technology in the educational setting and exploration of emerging resources. Elements such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Internet Explorer, hardware, and troubleshooting are included.

ETM 5020 Integrating Technology into the Curriculum (3)

Examines applications of traditional and emerging technology to the curriculum with an emphasis on the use of technology as an instructional tool to enhance the quality of classroom instruction and facilitate the work of the teacher. This course includes lesson planning, hands-on experience with a variety of technologies, and discussions of the place of technology in dynamic school paradigms.

ETM 5030 Application Software for Educational Settings (3)

Studies applications of technology to the curriculum in a variety of disciplines and reviews software and technology projects to enhance science, mathematics, social studies, language arts, and other pertinent curriculum areas. Criteria for evaluating software and technology projects are discussed, and technological resources in each curricular area are presented. The course includes using software such as KidPix, School House Rock, Inspiration, Kidspiration.

ETM 5040 Instructional Design and Multimedia Authoring (3)

Focuses on the utilization of design principles to effectively communicate instructional and professional materials prepared for the classroom, school/district, and professional development use. Candidates learn how to use multimedia authoring tools to produce courseware for classroom use and how to incorporate multimedia design projects into their curricula. The course includes such elements as Web page design, I-Movie, enhanced PowerPoint, and Windows MovieMaker.

ETM 5050 Technology Planning and Administration (3)

Prepares technology leaders for technology planning and administration, including staff development, management programs, legal issues, and grant writing. The course includes creating technology plans; reviewing acceptable use policies; working with IT department in school and district; previewing school management software, grade programs, counseling programs, special education programs, and library programs; managing change processes; and considering the ethical and societal impact of technology. Elements such as technology planning and administration, creating a technology plan, acceptable use policy, working with IT department in school, school management software, grade programs, counseling programs, legal issues, ethics, and societal impact will be addressed.

ETM 5060 Practicum (3)

One hundred hours of professional practice are required. Candidates may intern or conduct a project in a school, business, or other appropriate setting. Approval by program advisor is required. Some additional field experience hours may be required in conjunction with coursework.

ETM 5070 Exit Assessment (0)

The exit assessment is the culminating activity of the program. The candidate demonstrates learning and presents the e-portfolio for evaluation.

MLI 5000 Professional and Ethical Issues (3)

Emphasizes the importance of commitment to personal and professional growth and knowledge of a variety of cultural and philosophical viewpoints and provision of information and materials to reflect this variety. Issues of censorship, standards for information programs, and purposes for libraries are discussed.

MLI 5010 Information Technologies I (3)

Development of technological literacy. This course focuses on understanding and use of basic computer applications. Use of on-line databases, Internet, PowerPoint, and CU See Me Web design are included.

MLI 5020 Information Technologies II (3)

Studies advanced understanding of technological applications including desk top publishing, media production, Boolean searching and other library-related applications.

MLI 5030 Knowledge Environment (3)

Effective communication with library users to provide guidance in selection and use of materials and electronic media is emphasized in this course. Strategies for providing ideas and training to a variety of library media users of library and media resources are suggested. Create an organized, accessible environment that facilitates access and stimulates use of library resources and is conducive to learning.

MLI 5040 Fiction/Non-Fiction Resources for Children and Young Adults (3)

Knowledge of books, media, instructional materials and electronic resources appropriate for children, young adults, and adults are important aspects of this course.

MLI 5050 Research Tools and Strategies (3)

Focuses on research skills and strategies, including evaluation and analysis of information with ability to convey to users. Understanding of traditional and non-traditional research tools and the ability to use technology for research and information retrieval and to instruct users in the use of electronic resources will be emphasized. Knowledge of books, media and instructional materials appropriate for children, young adults, and adults are explored.

MLI 5060 Knowledge Management (3)

Candidates develop and implement short and long range goals for a library information program. Personnel management procedures, development and administration of library information programs and processes, and management of instructional and administrative computer applications are studied.

MLI 5070 Knowledge Leadership (3)

Collaboration with users on curriculum and instructional design is emphasized. Understanding of learning styles, student development and strategies to meet the needs of diverse learners are discussed. Candidates identify and select resources appropriate to curriculum areas and to various client groups. The importance of preparing one's self to become a life-long learner is included.

MLI 5080 Collection Development and Organization (3)

Focuses on books, media, and instructional material appropriate for children, young adults, and adults. Candidates plan collection development to accommodate the needs of users, evaluate both internal holdings and external resources to select appropriate resources, explore library classification systems and cataloging resources, evaluate automation resources and systems, and gain knowledge of community and global resources.

MLI 5090 Professional Practice (6)

Consists of work experience in library environments under the guidance of practicing professional library information specialists. The course is to be taken by candidate who are licensed as teachers or who do not seek licensure. 200 clock hours are required by the State Department of Education.

MLI 5200 Enhanced Student Teaching (6)

A full semester of student teaching with placement in two libraries of differing grade levels. It is taken by students seeking initial licensure as school library information specialist.

MLI 5600 Exit Assessment/ E-Portfolio (0)

The e-portfolio, a web-based electronic tool provided to candidates at the beginning of the program, is considered a work in progress throughout the graduate library program. This web-based electronic tool provides the candidate powerful resources for reflecting, synthesizing, and evaluating course experiences during the duration of the program. Candidates are provided a course syllabus and framework for completing the exit assessment/e-portfolio. The culminating seminar for candidates will demonstrate learning. The seminar will include discussions, reflections, and written evidence regarding library and literacy related topics. This e-portfolio will be presented during the final semester of the program and is required for graduation. A pass/fail grading system will be used.

RDG 6000 Advanced Literacy/Reading Instruction: Theory and Practice (3)

Literacy acquisition as a developmental process is emphasized in this course. Activities are designed to create an appreciation for the complex process of reading. Lecture and discussion topics include an historical perspective on learning to read, what it means to be a reader and writer, the emergent reader, developmental stages of reading, assessment strategies for reading and writing, organizing and managing a balanced reading program, and selecting appropriate materials for instruction. Using technology to support language learning is explored. Practicum experiences at various grade levels will be required.

RDG 6010 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Middle and Secondary Schools (3)

The relationship between learning strategies and the subject areas normally taught in grades 4-12 is the focus for this course. Current theory and use of reading and writing in content areas is discussed. Reading comprehension as a process and skills such as fluency, attention, working memory, content specific vocabulary and motivation as each relates to constructing meaning from text will be examined. Using technology as a tool to support language learning in the content area will be explored. Assessment that mirrors instruction is embedded within the topics. Course addresses state standards 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

RDG 6020 Literature and Book Selection for Children and Adolescents (3)

The various genres of literature for children and adolescents, and approaches to building a quality literature program are highlighted. Criteria for selecting quality literature through consideration of developmental needs, reading levels, and relevancy for today's children and youth are investigated. A bibliography of selected children's books or adolescent books is required.

RDG 6030 Analysis and Correction of Reading Problems (3)

Emphasis is placed on theory and practice in the diagnosis and treatment of reading difficulties. Candidates are introduced to formal diagnostic tools for identifying struggling readers. Candidates examine research-based strategies, practices and intervention programs and criteria for selecting appropriate materials for instruction. Guidelines for communicating with parents and community regarding students' reading difficulties and progress will be discussed. Application of assessment and intervention techniques are required through a diagnostic case study in which the candidate tutors a child, identifies the reading problem, implements intervention strategies to correct the problem, and makes recommendations for parents and teachers. Candidates will connect research, theory, and practice as they share tutoring experiences and receive feedback from their peers.

RDG 6040 Diverse Learners and Literacy Instruction (3)

Differentiation of instruction for English language learners, special needs children and culturally diverse learners are emphasized in this course. Learning styles and learning models are explored and integrated into curriculum, instruction and assessment. Various strategies, and methods of reading instruction used in settings with special populations will be examined as well as the research that has evaluated different models. A literacy practicum with special populations is required. Course addresses state standards 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13.

RDG 6050 Reading: Supervision and Leadership (3)

Principles and procedures for planning, implementing, evaluating and supervising reading programs at the school, district, and state levels are studied. Included are theoretical foundations of planning and supervision as well as practical application of theory. A focused shadowing field experience is designed and carried out by the student. Course addresses state standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16.

RDG 6060 Seminar in Reading (3)

Current trends in research and issues in literacy are studied by critically examining selected qualitative and quantitative investigations that have shaped the field of reading. Candidates must complete an in-depth review of literacy research on a focused topic. As a part of this course, an action research project proposal is required. The instructor must approve the action research problem. Course addresses state standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16.

RDG 6070 Action Research in Reading (3)

The action research proposed in Seminar in Reading is implemented. A paper including the proposal, the literature review (work from Seminar in Reading), the methodology, and the results will be prepared. A multimedia presentation of the findings of the action research will be presented in class. Course addresses state standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16.

RDG 6080 Literacy Application for Secondary Instruction (3)

Designed to allow the reading specialist candidate to focus on an in-depth look at secondary literacy teaching and learning practices. Candidates will examine literacy strategies that demonstrate how the adolescent student can be taught to successfully read a broad range of challenging and difficult text with deeper levels of comprehension and how to write effectively. Topics will include: learning strategies that build the effective adolescent reader and writer, exploring the demanding world of literacy facing the adolescent student, motivating the adolescent for learning, and understanding how to allow choice within a rigorous curriculum. Assessment that mirrors instruction is embedded with the topics.

RDG 6600 E-Portfolio (0)

The e-portfolio, a web-based electronic tool provided to candidates at the beginning of the program, is considered a work in progress throughout the graduate Reading program. This web-based electronic tool provides the candidate powerful resources for reflecting, synthesizing, and evaluating course experiences during the duration of the program. Candidates are provided a course syllabus and framework for completing the e-portfolio. This e-portfolio will be presented during the final semester of the program and is required for graduation. A pass/fail grading system will be used.

SED 6000 Foundations of Special Education (3)

Provides an overview of issues and trends related to special education. The characteristics and educational impact of various disabilities across age and severity will be explored. Educational services and current research that assists children with disabilities are emphasized. Historical and current legal provisions relating to persons with disabilities from infancy to adulthood will be addressed.

SED 6010 Instructional Methods for Elementary Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities (3)

Provides an overview of the basic principles of instructional design for elementary students with disabilities. Reading and mathematics and content areas such as social studies and science are addressed. The focus is on developing an understanding of instructional design and on the application of basic instructional strategies and interventions, instructional evaluation, and program revision techniques. The course includes activities to support effective interventions.

SED 6020 Instructional Methods for Adolescents and Secondary School Students (3)

Provides an overview of middle and secondary school program models, instructional methods and materials, instructional planning, and curriculum options. Reading, and mathematics, as well as modifications and accommodations for content areas are addressed. Strategies to maximize reading comprehension and writing within the content areas are included. Topics include legal mandates of transition planning from school to future careers and continuing education, parental support, self-advocacy, community resources, and vocational assessment and planning.

SED 6030 Collaboration and Consultation for Students with Disabilities (2)

Addresses collaboration and consultation models that enhance the role of the special educator as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Topics include collaborative structure such as co-teaching; peer tutoring; interdisciplinary team planning; collaborating with families, community resources, and general education personnel; and coordinating, educating, and supervising paraprofessionals.

SED 6040 Instructional Practices in Inclusive Settings (2)

Addresses the instructional needs of students with disabilities in inclusive settings. There is a focus on specific research-based strategies in curriculum content acquisition using direct, explicit, and strategy models of instruction that match specific student needs. Universal design principles to develop appropriate modifications and accommodations are addressed. The course includes multi-tiered models of intervention and service delivery in response to general education students who are at risk for failure because of diverse cultural, learning and/or behavioral differences.

SED 6050 Procedures for Classroom Management (3)

Covers procedures using tenants of applied behavior analysis for addressing the needs of students with disabilities who demonstrate behavior problems. Principles and application of classroom management techniques and instructional strategies to change inappropriate behaviors through positive behavior support and management will be addressed. Candidates will learn to conduct Functional Behavior Assessments and develop Behavior Intervention Plans by assessing and determining the functions of problem behavior, and developing pro-social alternatives for home, school, and community settings.

SED 6060 Assessment Procedures for Students with Disabilities (3)

Focuses on assessment methods that are appropriate for students with disabilities. Tools to be reviewed include traditional psychometric instruments, curriculum-based assessments, criterion-referenced assessments, norm-referenced assessments, and alternative assessments that conform to State and Federal guidelines. Emphasis is on the interpretation of information from assessments into Individual Education Program goals and objectives and instructional programming. Current issues such as standards-based reform, response to intervention, and discrepancy model are addressed.

SED 6070 Instructional Methods of Teaching Students with Developmental Disabilities (2)

Addresses theoretical perspectives and research-based instructional methods materials, and curriculum for students with developmental disabilities, including autism. Assessment data will be analyzed to adapt curriculum and develop Individual Educational Programs to address functional academics; social, home, and community services; and life skills. Instructional approaches, alternative assessments, communication programming, assistive technology, proper positioning techniques, and medical monitoring are addressed.

SED 6660 E-Portfolio (0)

The e-portfolio, a web-based electronic tool provided to candidates at the beginning of the program, is considered a work in progress throughout the program. This web-based electronic tool provides the candidate powerful resources for reflecting, synthesizing, and evaluating course experiences during the duration of the program. Candidates are provided a course syllabus and framework for completing the e-portfolio. This e-portfolio will be presented during the final semester of the program and is required for graduation. A pass/fail grading system will be used.

TMA 6603 Curriculum and Technological Design (6)

This introductory course examines national, state, and local curriculum standards. Through the use of technology, candidates will create standard-based lesson plans. Candidates will also be introduced to LiveText and various organizational technological methods to facilitate organizational and planning skills.

TMA 6615 Secondary Instructional Design 7-12 (3)

Explores the climate and culture of effective secondary learning environments, programming, and instructional and curricular models within the 7-12 school setting. Teaching strategies that facilitate learning in the secondary grades are also examined. Candidates review developmentally appropriate practices in the 7-12 learning environment. A second component of this course explores ways to prevent misbehaviors from occurring, support students when misbehaviors occur, and correct students when problems persist. Emphasis is placed on holding high expectations, encouraging and motivating the heart, and modeling the way for students in a firm and caring learning environment. Addressing the needs of students with special needs, including English language learners, is included. A field experience is included.

TMA 6623 Interdisciplinary Elementary Methods (9)

Analyzes current trends in instructional strategies for K-6 students pertaining to four subject areas: Reading, Math, Science, Social Studies. An integrated and constructivist approach to teaching grades K-6 is modeled and emphasized. During the course, candidates will integrate the various elementary subjects and align instructional strategies to national, state, and local curriculum standards. Using research-based instructional practices this course explores teaching elementary subject areas through hands-on experiences, student participation, higher order thinking, visual and performing arts, technology, inquiry based models, authentic assessment, and project based learning.

TMA 6625 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Middle and Secondary (3)

Addresses teaching reading and writing in the various subject areas at the secondary level. It stresses skills of vocabulary building, comprehension and writing as well as skills and methods of motivating students to read and write. Classroom observation and analysis in a secondary school is required.

TMA 6628 Interdisciplinary Secondary Methods (9)

Analyzes current trends in instructional strategies for 7-12 students. An integrated and constructivist approach is modeled and emphasized. During the course, candidate will research a content area and align instructional strategies pertaining to that content area to national, state, and local standards. Using research-based instructional practices this course explores teaching secondary subject areas through hands-on experiences, student participation, higher order thinking, visual and performing arts, technology, inquiry based models, authentic assessment, and project based learning.

TMA 6635 Methods and Tools for Secondary Teachers (3)

Focuses on materials, methods, and skills needed to effectively teach at the secondary level. A variety of instructional tools, including significant use of technology, is included.

TMA 6650 Student Teaching and Seminar (6)

The candidate must have taken and passed all specialty area tests required by the State Department of Education for licensure prior to enrolling in student teaching. Student teaching includes a 15-week, semester long professional practice experience in two diverse elementary public school settings at different grade levels, an opening of school experience, and a seminar component for processing the application of knowledge and the analysis of teaching skills, lesson and unit planning, classroom management, and other professional issues. The culminating activity is the review of the portfolio by School of Education faculty. Successful completion of the seminar and the portfolio is required in order for the student to receive a pass in student teaching.

TMA 6660 - 6664 E-Portfolio Seminar (0)

Beginning with the first MAT course, the e-portfolio will be a work in progress for the duration of the program. The E-Portfolio Seminar is designed for a candidate who has successfully completed thirty hours of course work. This e-portfolio will serve as the culminating activity and is required for graduation in the Master of Arts in Teaching program. A fee will be imposed to cover the cost of Live Text web access and space. A Pass-Fail grading system will be used.

TMA 6665 Student Teaching and Seminar 7 - 12 (6)

The candidate must have taken and passed all specialty area tests required by the State Department of Education for licensure prior to enrolling in student teaching. Student teaching includes a 15-week, semester long professional practice experience in two diverse secondary public school settings at different grade levels, an opening of school experience, and a seminar component for processing the application of knowledge and the analysis of teaching skills, lesson and unit planning, classroom management, and other professional issues. The culminating activity is the review of the portfolio by School of Education faculty. Successful completion of the seminar and the portfolio is required in order for the candidate to receive a pass in student teaching.

TMA 6670 Urban Perspectives in Teaching and Learning (3)

Designed to provide an overview of the diverse educational needs, challenges, opportunities and rewards that teachers encounter as they seek to effectively meet the needs of learners in urban schools. Students will explore the historical perspectives of public urban education, and the characteristics of the urban child as well as culturally relevant issues that impact the progress of teaching and learning in an urban setting. Students will examine the impact of poverty on children who may be deemed "at risk." This course will focus on equipping students with the competencies, principles, tools, and instructional strategies to effectively create a positive classroom environment that fosters student achievement.

TMA 6680 Teaching the Exceptional Learner (3)

Designed to provide an overview and an awareness of issues and trends related to special education that will assist regular education teachers in meeting the needs of all students in their classrooms, especially those who are at-risk or may have disabilities. General characteristics and the educational impact of various disabilities across age and severity will be explored. Information concerning educational services and current research about students with disabilities will be discussed. Candidates will actually explore a variety of methods, strategies, and tools that will help them acquire the instructional skills to identify, create interventions, participate in the special education process and make classroom accommodations and/or modifications for students that may have disabilities.

TMA 6690 Practicum (0)

Once enrolled in the program, candidates will complete a sixty (60) hour practicum experience applicable to the area of certification. This hands-on course is designed to expose candidates to a variety of experiences in the chosen field of study. Over a period of several semesters, candidates work at his/her own pace with the assistance of a mentor. Mentors meet and assess candidate progress each semester. Activities include observing, assisting, tutoring, and teaching in the schools. All hours must be completed prior to the student teaching experience. A pass-fall grading system will be used.

TMA 6710 Transitional Licensure Seminar I (2)

A seminar designed to enhance the Tennessee State Department of Education's mandated mentoring program required for all candidates who are serving as "Teacher of Record" on a Transition License. The curriculum will be "student driven" with a wide variety of topics and themes to address the myriad of needs, issues and challenges encountered by first and second year teachers. The grading scale is S/U. A mentoring fee will be assessed in addition to tuition costs.

TMA 6715 Transitional Licensure Seminar II (1)

A seminar designed to enhance the Tennessee State Department of Education's mandated mentoring program required for all students who are serving as "Teacher of Record" on a Transition License. The curriculum will be "student driven" with a wide variety of topics and themes to address the myriad of needs, issues and challenges encountered by first and second year teachers. The grading scale is S/U. A mentoring fee will be assessed in addition to tuition costs.

VIS 6010 Special Education and Visual Impairments (3)

Provides fundamentals of physical, cognitive, perceptual, and psychological development of individuals with varying exceptionalities with a focus on individuals with visual impairments and multiple exceptionalities. Includes a focus on research-based theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and historical points of view, and issues in special education.

VIS 6020 Introduction to Braille (4)

Provides fundamentals in reading and writing Braille using a Braille writer and slate and stylus and methodology for teaching Braille reading and writing. Includes a focus on teaching and using Braille within content areas.

VIS 6030 Advanced Braille (3)

Provides advanced skills in reading and writing Braille using a Braille writer and slate and stylus as well as methodology for teaching Braille reading and writing. Includes a focus on teaching and using Braille within content areas.

VIS 6040 Practicum I (0)

Provides a supervised experience working with individuals who are visually impaired, PreK-age 21. Candidates will complete a total of 30 hours to include classroom experience in mathematics, reading, and Braille classes at Tennessee School for the Blind; 6 hours with an Itinerant teacher; and an overnight experience at Tennessee School for the Blind. Completed concurrently with EDU 6080. Grade of S/U.

VIS 6045 Anatomy and Issues of Visual Learning (3)

Provides an understanding of the physical structures of the eyes and their functions. Includes an understanding of the pathologies that affect the visual system and how they impact the functioning of an individual. A focus will include understanding visual assessments and interpretation of clinical reports.

VIS 6055 Practicum II (0)

Provides a supervised experience working with individuals who are visually impaired, PreK- age 21. Candidates will complete a total of 30 hours to include classroom experience in science, social studies/history and Braille classes at Tennessee School for the Blind; 6 hours with an Itinerant teacher; and an overnight experience at Tennessee School for the Blind. Completed concurrently with EDU 6085. Grade of S/U.

VIS 6060 Expanded Core Curriculum (3)

Provides an understanding that students with visual impairments require a curriculum beyond content standards to meet independent and functional living goals. Candidates will gain understanding and practical experience with orientation, mobility, and specialized supports. Instruction will include increasing self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-advocacy of students with visual impairments and multiple exceptionalities in the home, community, and school. In addition, a focus will include awareness, acceptance, and appreciation for students with visual impairments and multiple exceptionalities in the home, community, and school.

VIS 6065 Nemeth Code (3)

Focuses on Nemeth Code to study mathematics and other content areas that include mathematics such as science, geography, and others.

VIS 6070 Assessment for Visual Impairments (3)

Examines and explores the unique educational needs of individuals with visual impairments with a focus on individuals with multiple exceptionalities. Candidates will explore and use various techniques for assessment individuals in a full array of educational and community settings. Included is the planning of an education program for students with visual impairments.

VIS 6090 Exit Assessment (0)

Presentation of portfolio.

Teaching Faculty (Full-time to the University)

JAMES AGEE
B.B.A., Eastern Nazarene College, 1994; Ph.D., University at Albany, 2000.

JUDY BIVENS
B.S., University of Tennessee at Martin, 1969; M.A.T., Middle Tennessee State University, 1975; plus 30 in Technology, Western Kentucky University; M.I.S., UT Knoxville, 2000; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 2008.

JONATHAN B. BURCH
BA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1997; MBA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1999; Ed.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2003.

PENNEY CARDEN
B.S., Whitworth College, 1975; M.Ed. Valdosta State University, 1999; Ed.D. NOVA Southeastern University, 2004.

LINDA COLLINS
B.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1970; M.A., University of Northern Colorado, 1977; Ed.D., George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1990.

AMY CONDITT
B.S., University of Tennessee, 1992; M.S., University of Tennessee, 1993; Ed.S., Tennessee State University, 2002; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 2004.

RUTH COX
B.A., Asbury College, 1970; M.A., Eastern Kentucky University, 1973; Ed.D., NOVA Southeastern University, 1985.

DONNA GRAY
B.S., Trevecca Nazarene College, 1982; M.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1986; Ed.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005.

SUZANN HARRIS, Dean of the School of Education
B.A. Welch College, 1975; M.Ed., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1991, Ed.D. Trevecca Nazarene University, 2003.

RUTH KINNERSLEY
B.A, Greenville College, 1982; M.S.L.I.S., University of Illinois, 1983; M.A.E., Olivet Nazarene University, 1989; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 2009.

CAROL MAXSON
B.A., Olivet Nazarene University, 1988; M.A.E., Olivet Nazarene University, 1990; Ed.D. NOVA Southeastern University, 2000.

RICHARD PARROTT
B.A., Eastern Nazarene College, 1974; M.A. University of Missouri, 1975; M.Div. Nazarene Theological Seminary, 1980; Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1983.

ALICE PATTERSON
B.S., George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1977; M.Ed., George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1985; Ed.D., George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1992.

STEPHEN PUSEY
B.A., Olivet Nazarene University, 1975; M.A., Northern Arizona University, 1976; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1981.

PRILLA SPEER
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1978; M.L.S., George Peabody College of Vanderbilt University, 1979.

TANDY K. TAYLOR
B.A., Belmont College, 1977; M.Ed., Tennessee State University, 1982; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1987.

MICHAEL VAIL
B.A., Northwest Nazarene University, 1972; M.Ed., University of Idaho, 1976; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1979.

MARCIA WALKER
B.S., Alcorn State University, 1994; B.S., Delta State University, 1999; M.Ed., Delta State University, 2000; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 2006.

LENA HEGI WELCH
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene College, 1981; M.A., Auburn University, 1983; Ed.D. Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005.

DONNA YOUREE
B.S., University of Missouri, 1968; M.Ed., Middle Tennessee State University, 1985; Ed.D., Tennessee State University, 1998.