Graduate Business Program

Master of Science: Management

Master of Business Administration: Management

Master of Science: Information Technology

Master of Business Administration: Information Technology

Skinner School of Business and Technology

Boone Business Building

615-248-1529 • 1-800-818-4256

management@trevecca.edu

www.trevecca.edu/msm

www.trevecca.edu/mba

www.trevecca.edu/msit

www.trevecca.edu/mbait

The Skinner School of Business and Technology

The Skinner School of Business and Technology includes the Department of Business Administration and the Department of Information Technology. The Skinner School of Business and Technology (SSBT) offers undergraduate and graduate programs in business and information technology. The Department of Business Administration offers the Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree with concentrations in accounting, community development, information technology, E-commerce, digital multimedia communication, music business, marketing and management. The Department of Information Technology offers the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Information Technology with concentrations in digital graphic design and multimedia, web development, and specialized computing for traditional students. The Skinner School of Business and Technology also offers nontraditional baccalaureate and master's degree programs in management, business administration, and information technology for working adult students. Graduate business programs are offered leading to the following degrees: Master of Science in Management (MSM), Master of Business Administration (MBA), and Master of Science in Information Technology (MSIT), and *Master of Business Administration in Information Technology (MBAIT).

A major goal of the school is to enable students to develop strong competencies in their chosen career fields, thereby preparing them to make positive contributions to their professions and society. Programs focus on fulfilling the mission of the University by developing business and technology leaders and managers who understand and appreciate Christ's call to servanthood as the foundation of effective leadership and management.

*The MBAIT Program is being discontinued. No applicants are being accepted. Students currently in the program have been provided with completion plans. A similar information technology track is now offered in the MBA degree program.

General Description

The graduate programs are innovatively designed based on the lifestyle and needs of today's highly mobile graduate business students. The curriculum requires few prerequisites and has an integrated, applications-based qualitative and quantitative focus. Its curriculum promotes a learning environment where students use an integrated systems approach to hone organizational management and leadership skills and techniques. This approach encourages students to view problems from many perspectives and to identify comprehensive business solutions that incorporate key issues such as strategic planning, globalization, and market and product development within the scope of legal environments and business ethics. Students are also challenged to consider critical issues such as normal organizational constraints of human, operational, and financial capital in their decision making processes. Finally, students learn to apply implementation skills including visionary leadership, effective communication, team-building, and change management to an increasingly diverse workforce.

The delivery system is unique as well. The curriculum is modularized, concentrated, focused on team-based learning, and designed specifically for working adults, and recent business graduates, who desire to incorporate their diverse academic and experiential backgrounds into their learning process.

The MSM Program is comprised of 30 semester hours and takes approximately 16 months to complete. The MBA Program, comprised of 42 semester hours, takes approximately 22 months to complete. The MSIT Program consists of 30 semester hours and can be completed in 16 months. The MBAIT Program consists of 44 semester hours and can be completed in 16 months. The program courses are designed to strategically build on one another. Each cohort group will move through the program one course at a time, in a lock-step fashion. Classes meet one night each week in four-hour sessions.

Students are a part of a cohort group who will attend all the courses together, forming an important, cohesive support group. Classes are taught seminar/discussion style. Team-based learning approaches are emphasized, capitalizing on student collaboration and peer accountability. The graduate faculty is committed to instructional strategies and assessment methods that allow for maximum synthesis, exploration, and analysis by the students at a graduate level of depth and complexity.

The aim is to extend the students' knowledge and intellectual maturity and to equip the student with specialized skills and a sense of creative independence that will allow the student to provide effective leadership in any organization. Competency-based evaluation methods, application-based projects, learning contracts, and other individualized instructional techniques are used wherever appropriate.

Greetings

From the Dean

The Skinner School of Business and Technology seeks to provide a quality learning environment that calls students to excellence in the marketplace.

To the task of continuing to develop your talents and to become truly "excellent," I welcome you whole-heartedly to the Skinner School of Business and Technology. If I may be of help to you, please do not hesitate to let me know.

James T. Hiatt, B.S., J.D., M.B.A.
Dean, Skinner School of Business and Technology

From the Director

Welcome to the Skinner School of Business and Technology at Trevecca Nazarene University. We are pleased and excited to have you as part of the Trevecca community. I believe you will find our graduate programs challenging and rewarding as you seek to prepare yourself for the changing marketplace. Our goal and desire is to help equip you with the knowledge and tools necessary to effectively lead and support organizations. Based on the University and School missions, we seek to develop business and technology leaders that exemplify Christ and serve as models in the workplace. I hope you find your experience at Trevecca rewarding and a true blessing. I look forward to being of help to you on your journey. May the Lord richly bless you along the way!

Rick Mann, B.S., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D., M.B.A.
Director, Graduate and Professional Studies

The Master of Science: Management (MSM) Program

MSM Program Mission

The Master of Science: Management (MSM) program exists to provide a quality graduate-level education for working professionals as well as recent graduates seeking to further develop their business and management skills in a global and dynamic environment. The program seeks to equip and empower students to lead in organizations and functions from a Christian world-view.

MSM Academic Program

The Master of Science: Management (MSM) program is 16 months in length. Each course is 6 weeks in length. Classes are scheduled to meet one night a week. In addition, students will have work and project time outside the classroom. The distance education portion of any classes, if offered, may include online self-paced learning or other technology assisted education such as online classes conducted by the instructor.

The MSM program requires the following prerequisites or their equivalents (9 hours): BUS 3075 Business Foundations (3), ACT 3080 Foundations of Financial Accounting (3), and FIN 3085 Foundations of Managerial Finance (3).The MSM program is 30 credit hours. Students are required to complete set graduate business core courses and one (1) of four available graduate business tracks. The selection and completion of a track is required.

MSM Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the MSM program should be able to:

  1. Synthesize and apply the functional areas of business to meet organizational goals.
  2. Design and manage the implementation of complex business solutions.
  3. Analyze and evaluate organizational related artifacts to make appropriate management decisions.
  4. Diagnose organizational situations and evaluate business strategies in a global context.
  5. Apply strategic analysis and planning tools.
  6. Communicate and present in a way that enhances organizational effectiveness.
  7. Interpret and comply with the business legal and regulatory mandates.
  8. Assess and develop the human resources of an organization.
  9. Apply advanced quantitative tools and techniques to support business and organizational development.

MSM Program Curriculum

General Business Core

18 hours

BUS 5013

Organizational Behavior and Leadership

(3)

ECO 5023

Global and Economic Environment

(3)

BUS 6073

Data-based Decision Making

(3)

ITI 5073

Management and Information Systems

(3)

MKT 5093

Marketing Management

(3)

BUS 6013

Business Ethics and Organizational Cultural Development

(3)

Choose one of the following minors:

Information Technology Track

12 hours

ITI 6600

Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Environment

(3)

ITI 6000

IT Architecture

(3)

ITI 6300

IT Project Planning, Management, and Financial Control

(3)

ITI 6500

IT Governance and Strategy

(3)

Healthcare Administration Track

12 hours

HLT 6000

Healthcare Policy and Systems

(3)

HLT 6200

Legal and Regulatory Issues in Healthcare

(3)

HLT 6400

Quality Healthcare Management

(3)

HLT 6600

Healthcare Strategy

(3)

Project Management Track

12 hours

PMI 6000

Introduction to Project Program Management

(3)

PMI 6200

Project Schedule and Risk Management

(3)

PMI 6400

Cost, Contract, and Procurement Management

(3)

PMI 6600

Advanced Project and Program Management

(3)

Management and Leadership Track

12 hours

BUS 6223

The Legal Environment of Business

(3)

BUS 6100

Human Resources Development and Management

(3)

PMI 6000

Introduction to Project Program Management

(3)

BUS 6200

Leadership and Strategic Planning for Servant Leaders

(3)

Total Hours For Degree

30 hours

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program

MBA Program Mission

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) program exists to provide a quality graduate-level education for working professionals as well as recent graduates seeking to further develop their business, strategic management, and quantitative skills in a global and dynamic environment. The program seeks to equip and empower students to lead in organizations and functions from a Christian world-view.

MBA Academic Program

The Master of Business Administration: Management (MBA) program is 22 months in length. Each course is 6 weeks in length, with the exception of Advanced Accounting which is 7 weeks in length for examination purposes. Classes are scheduled to meet one night a week. In addition, students will have work and project time outside the classroom. The distance education portion of any classes, if offered, may include online self-paced learning or other technology assisted education such as online classes conducted by the instructor.

The MBA program requires the following prerequisite (9 hours): BUS 3075 Business Foundations (3), ACT 3080 Foundations of Financial Accounting (3), and FIN 3085 Foundations of Managerial Finance (3). The MBA program is 42 credit hours. Students are required to complete set graduate business core courses, set MBA core courses, and one (1) of four available graduate business tracks. The selection and completion of a track is required.

MBA Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the MBA program should be able to:

  1. Synthesize and apply the functional areas of business to meet organizational goals.
  2. Design and manage the implementation of complex business solutions.
  3. Analyze and evaluate organizational related artifacts to make appropriate management decisions.
  4. Diagnose organizational situations and evaluate business strategies in a global context.
  5. Apply strategic analysis and planning tools.
  6. Communicate and present in a way that enhances organizational effectiveness.
  7. Interpret and comply with the business legal and regulatory mandates.
  8. Assess and develop the human resources of an organization.
  9. Apply advanced quantitative tools and techniques to support business and organizational development.

MBA Program Curriculum

General Business Core

18 hours

BUS 5013

Organizational Behavior and Leadership

(3)

ECO 5023

Global and Economic Environment

(3)

BUS 6073

Data-based Decision Making

(3)

ITI 5073

Management and Information Systems

(3)

MKT 5093

Marketing Management

(3)

BUS 6013

Business Ethics and Organizational Cultural Development

(3)

MBA Core

12 hours

ACT 6203

Advanced Managerial Accounting

(3)

BUS 6023

Production and Operations Management

(3)

FIN 6213

Advanced Managerial Finance

(3)

BUS 6033

Organizational Strategy and Change

(3)

Choose one of the following minors:

Information Technology Track

12 hours

ITI 6600

Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Environment

(3)

ITI 6000

IT Architecture

(3)

ITI 6300

IT Project Planning, Management, and Financial Control

(3)

ITI 6500

IT Governance and Strategy

(3)

Healthcare Administration Track

12 hours

HLT 6000

Healthcare Policy and Systems

(3)

HLT 6200

Legal and Regulatory Issues in Healthcare

(3)

HLT 6400

Quality Healthcare Management

(3)

HLT 6600

Healthcare Strategy

(3)

Project Management Track

12 hours

PMI 6000

Introduction to Project Program Management

(3)

PMI 6200

Project Schedule and Risk Management

(3)

PMI 6400

Cost, Contract, and Procurement Management

(3)

PMI 6600

Advanced Project and Program Management

(3)

Management and Leadership Track

12 hours

BUS 6223

The Legal Environment of Business

(3)

BUS 6100

Human Resources Development and Management

(3)

PMI 6000

Introduction to Project Program Management

(3)

BUS 6200

Leadership and Strategic Planning for Servant Leaders

(3)

Total Hours For Degree

42 hours

The Master of Science: Information Technology (MSIT) Program

MSIT Program Mission

The Master of Science: Information Technology (MSIT) program exists to provide a quality graduate-level education for working professionals as well as recent graduates seeking to further develop their information technology skills in the design, development, and implementation of robust information technology solutions in a dynamic business environment. This program seeks to equip and empower students to lead information technology efforts in an organization and functions from a Christian world-view.

MSIT Academic Program

The Master of Science: Information Technology (MSIT) program is 16 months in length. Each course is 6 weeks in length. Classes are scheduled to meet one night a week. In addition, students will have work and project time outside the classroom. The distance education portion of any classes, if offered, may include online self-paced learning or other technology assisted education such as online classes conducted by the instructor.

The MSIT program requires the following prerequisites (12 hours) or equivalents: CIT 2100 Business Programming I (3), CIT 2500 IT Networking and Security (3), CIT 2700 Database Design and Programming I (3), and CIT 2800 Web Design and Scripting I (3). The MSIT program is 30 credit hours.

MSIT Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the MSIT program should be able to:

  1. Identify and explain the techniques and tools of leading an IT organizational function.
  2. Manage critical IT systems such as communication infrastructure, enterprise database systems, and financial applications.
  3. Design and manage IT solutions to solve complicated business problems.
  4. Apply IT governance to successfully implement and support business critical information technologies.
  5. Design and develop IT solutions for enterprise business needs.
  6. Use advanced technology tools and techniques to support application development and business analysis.
  7. Identify, evaluate, and select appropriate hardware and software solutions.

MSIT Program Curriculum

MSIT Information Technology Courses

30 hours

ITI 6600

Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Environment

(3)

ITI 6000

IT Architecture

(3)

ITI 6300

IT Project Planning, Management, and Financial Control

(3)

ITI 6500

IT Governance and Strategy

(3)

ITI 6200

Enterprise Database Systems

(3)

ITI 6050

Enterprise Computer Security and Forensics

(3)

ITI 6260

Data Warehousing and Mining

(3)

ITI 6330

Enterprise Storage and Virtualization

(3)

ITI 6700

Advanced Web Development

(3)

ITI 6800

Current Trends in IT

(3)

Graduate Certificates

The Skinner School of Business and Technology offers certificates to graduate -level students who wish to enhance an existing master's degree or gain graduate level education in a relevant topic area. Graduate certificates are offered in Information Technology, Healthcare Administration, Project Management, and Management and Leadership. Courses that are required for the certificate are currently a part of the school's degree curriculum. There are no prerequisites for the certificate programs. Completion of each certificate requires 4 select courses (12 credit hours). Each course offered is 6 weeks in length. Classes are scheduled to meet one night a week. In addition, students will have work and project time outside the classroom. The distance education portion of any, if offered, classes may include online self-paced learning or other technology assisted education such as online classes conducted by the instructor.

Certificate Curriculum

Information Technology Track

12 hours

ITI 6600

Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Environment

(3)

ITI 6000

IT Architecture

(3)

ITI 6300

IT Project Planning, Management, and Financial Control

(3)

ITI 6500

IT Governance and Strategy

(3)

Healthcare Administration Track

12 hours

HLT 6000

Healthcare Policy and Systems

(3)

HLT 6200

Legal and Regulatory Issues in Healthcare

(3)

HLT 6400

Quality Healthcare Management

(3)

HLT 6600

Healthcare Strategy

(3)

Project Management Track

12 hours

PMI 6000

Introduction to Project Program Management

(3)

PMI 6200

Project Schedule and Risk Management

(3)

PMI 6400

Cost, Contract, and Procurement Management

(3)

PMI 6600

Advanced Project and Program Management

(3)

Management and Leadership Track

12 hours

BUS 6223

The Legal Environment of Business

(3)

BUS 6100

Human Resources Development and Management

(3)

PMI 6000

Introduction to Project Program Management

(3)

BUS 6200

Leadership and Strategic Planning for Servant Leaders

(3)

Admission Policies and Procedures

MSM/MBA/MSIT Admission Requirements

Admission into the MSM, MBA, or MSIT programs is competitive and based on a careful appraisal of the applicant's academic record, performance, and work experience, if any.

To be considered for admission, applicants must:

  1. Submit a completed application.
  2. Have earned a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution, with a cumulative undergraduate grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.75 or higher. Applicants must submit one official transcript from all colleges/universities attended (undergraduate and graduate work). These transcripts must be sent directly from the institution to College of Lifelong Learning Admissions, Trevecca Nazarene University, 333 Murfreesboro Rd., Nashville, TN 37210. All hours from accredited institutions will be considered in calculating the cumulative GPA.
  3. Submit a current resume.
  4. Have prior credit of a college math course (grade "C" or higher), reflected on transcript, or equivalent.
  5. Have prior credit of a college English Composition course (grade "C" or higher), reflected on transcript, or equivalent.

For admission into the MSM or MBA programs, the applicant must additionally:

  1. Have prior credit for necessary 9 hours of the following prerequisite courses, or equivalents, reflected on transcript: BUS 3075 Business Foundations (3), ACT 3080 Foundations of Financial Accounting (3), and FIN 3085 Foundations of Managerial Finance (3).
  2. The prerequisites are met by those holding an undergraduate degree in business. Students not holding an undergraduate business degree must demonstrate an undergraduate level of business competency by:
    1. Taking prerequisite courses in accounting, finance, and business foundations (9 hours), OR
    2. Take and pass an assessment exam dealing with the areas in the 3 prerequisite courses, OR
    3. Take and pass online leveling modules for areas not passed in the assessment, OR
    4. Transfer equivalent undergraduate courses from another accredited institution.

For admission into the MSIT programs, the applicant must additionally:

  1. Hold an undergraduate computing degree. Students not holding an undergraduate computing degree must demonstrate an undergraduate level of computing competency by taking the following prerequisites (12 hours) or equivalents: CIT 2100 Business Programming I (3), CIT 2500 IT Networking and Security (3), CIT 2700 Database Design and Programming I (3), and CIT 2800 Web Design and Scripting I (3).

Students not meeting the minimum requirements may request conditional admission from the Skinner School of Business and Technology Graduate Admissions Committee.

Conditional Admission

If the admissions requirements are not fully met, the Skinner School of Business and Technology (SSBT) Graduate Program Admissions Committee will review the applicant's file and may grant admittance to the program on a conditional status. A student receiving conditional admission must have at least a GPA of 3.0 at the completion of 9 credit hours in the program. If this condition is met, the student will be granted full standing admission in the program and will be subject to the standard program policies. If the condition is not met, the student is placed on academic suspension. If the student wishes to continue in the program (e.g. because of extenuating circumstances), the student must submit a written request to the Graduate Program Admissions Committee for consideration of whether the student should be allowed to continue under conditional status or be dismissed from the program. If such determination is made by the committee to allow further work under conditional status, then the student must have a 3.0 average after 18 hours in the program. If the student has less than a 3.0 after 18 hours in the program, the student is placed on academic suspension. Students interested in being reinstated should consult the academic suspension policy.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition

$654.00 per credit hour

Books and Materials*

$200.00 per course

Total MSM investment

$21,620.00

Total MBA investment

$30,268.00

Total MSIT investment

$21,620.00

*The book and materials fee for each course is an average cost for the books for the entire program. It also includes other various fees, such as a $150 per semester technology fee and a $100 graduation fee.

Upon notification of acceptance, the student must pay a non-refundable admission fee of $200 in order to reserve a place in the class. This fee will be applied toward the first semester tuition.

Academic Policies

Graduation Requirements

To receive the Master of Science: Management (MSM), a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The required 30 semester hours of graduate credit must be completed with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Note: grades for all graduate courses, including transfer credits, will be used to calculate the student's cumulative graduate grade-point average.
  2. No course or credit hours will count toward graduation if the grade earned is a C- or below.

To receive the Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The required 42 semester hours of graduate credit must be completed with a cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher.
  2. No course grade of C- or below will count toward graduation.

To receive the Master of Science: Information Technology (MSIT) degree, a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The required 30 semester hours of graduate credit must be completed with a cumulative graduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher.
  2. No course grade of C- or below will count toward graduation.

Application for graduation must be completed by September 30 for December diplomas and by December 31 for May or August diplomas.

Graduation requirements are defined by the student's "graduation year" catalog or the catalog immediately preceding his/her graduation year.

There is no qualifying or exit examination. A student achieves candidacy status in the MSM or MSIT program when he or she has earned at least 18 semester hours of graduate credit with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. A student achieves candidacy status in the MBA program when he or she has earned at least 30 semester hours of graduate credit with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

Probation Policy

Any student receiving a grade of C- or less in any course will be automatically placed on academic probation. The student may continue in the program but must repeat that course with a later group. Once the course which caused the student to be placed on probation is retaken and a grade of C or better is recorded then the student will return to academic "good standing."

Each student must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 each semester to remain in academic "good standing." If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 after the completion of nine hours, the student will be placed on academic probation for the next nine hours of the program. Upon gaining the required the 3.0 average, the student will be again in "good standing." However, if the student does not increase the average to a 3.0 during the probationary period, the student is placed on academic suspension. Students interested in being reinstated should consult the academic suspension policy.

Suspension Policy

Students who are on academic suspension may request permission to be reinstated in the program based on a review of the circumstances and information in the particular student's case. If the student under suspension has a GPA of 2.8 or higher, then the student may request permission from the Director to continue in the program.

Students with a GPA less than 2.8, or who have a GPA of 2.8 or higher but were denied permission to be reinstated by the director, may request permission to be reinstated in the program from the SBT Graduate Program Admissions Committee. Requests for reinstatement must be in writing and address the circumstances that resulted in suspension and how the student expects to be successful in completing the program.

If the Director or the SBT Graduate Program Admissions Committee grant reinstatement for the student to remain in the program, then the student will be required to retake courses in the first 18 hours of the program until the GPA is 3.0 or better. After the student attains a 3.0 GPA in the first 18 hours, the student will once again be placed in good standing and may continue the rest of the program. If the request for reinstatement is denied, then the student is dismissed from the program.

Grading System

Trevecca Nazarene University's grading system, based on class work and examinations, is as follows:

Description

Grade

Quality Points

Exceptional

A

4.0

 

A-

3.7

Superior

B+

3.3

 

B

3.0

 

B-

2.7

Average

C+

2.3

*Passing

C

2.0

 

C-

1.7

 

D+

1.3

 

D

1.0

 

D-

0.7

 

F

0.0

*Note: A grade lower than a C in a course must be repeated.

Incomplete

"I"

Given for sickness or emergency reasons near end of a course. The incomplete must be approved by the teacher and the program director. The "I" must be removed within six weeks or the grade will be based on points earned for completed work.

Withdrawal

"W"

Granted to a student who officially withdraws from a class before the beginning of the third class meeting. The grade of "W" may be assigned by the program director or the school dean in extenuating circumstances.

Class Attendance

Due to the highly concentrated nature of the Graduate Business Programs, attendance at all classes is mandatory for student success in the course work and the personal and small group relationships facilitated in the class sessions. In addition, attendance records are essential to comply with accreditation regulations. Each professor is required to record attendance at each class. Arriving late or leaving early counts against the student's attendance record and will be recorded by the professor. The attendance report will be sent to the program office before the next class session.

If a student experiences a situation which demands an unavoidable absence, the student is obligated to contact the professor to make arrangements prior to the class meeting. If the absence is unavoidable and if the professor is informed on a timely basis, the following guidelines apply:

  1. Make-up assignments that equate to the time and subject matter missed must be arranged with the professor. There is a limit of one absence during a course for which the professor can make such arrangements.
  2. For any absence beyond the first absence in a course, the student must receive permission from the Director and the course professor in order to continue the course.

The student's academic advisor will monitor attendance records. The policy on extreme absences is outlined below:

  1. When a student misses three classes in the program, he or she will be contacted in writing to ensure that the student will be able to successfully complete the program.
  2. Any student who has accumulated six absences will be on academic suspension. Students interested in being reinstated should consult the academic suspension policy.

Note: All prior absences DO carry over when changing groups except for repeated courses. An absence that is 'made up' (through attending another class session or completing a makeup assignment as directed by the professor) will still count against the student as an absence.

Withdrawal from Courses or the Program

If a student wishes to withdraw from an ongoing class with a grade of W, the student must provide a written request prior to the third class meeting. The request must be submitted to student's advisor in the College of Lifelong Learning during regular business hours. If a student attends the third class session, a letter grade must be assigned. Students who drop out of a group may continue in a later group with the approval of the Director provided they are in good standing and the group selected has space available.

If a student withdraws from the program, issuance of grades for specific courses will be governed by the above policy. The student can withdraw from an ongoing class if the withdrawal request is submitted to the office prior to the third class meeting. Once the request has been received, the student will receive a grade of W for that course. Any refund of tuition will be governed by the refund policy which appears in the Financial Services section of this catalog.

Academic Honesty

Academic honesty is expected of all students at Trevecca Nazarene University. It is an integral part of the educational process where learning takes place in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect. Each student is responsible to maintain high standards of academic ethics, personal honesty, and moral integrity. Dishonest academic behavior will be dealt with fairly and firmly.

The following types of infractions may result in course failure and/or program termination:

  1. Plagiarism, using another's statements or thoughts without giving the source appropriate credit.
  2. Cheating on an exam.
  3. Unauthorized multiple submissions of the same paper or major parts of a paper for another assignment.
  4. Submitting a borrowed or purchased paper for course credit.
  5. Defacing or unauthorized removal of course materials either from the classroom or library.
  6. Signing the roll for someone who is not present in class.
  7. Falsifying documentation including logs, reading lists and other self-reported items.

The Master of Business Administration: Information Technology (MBAIT) Program

The MBAIT Program is being discontinued. No applicants are being accepted. Students currently in the program have been provided with completion plans. A similar information technology track is now offered in the MBA degree program.

MBAIT Program Mission

The Master of Business Administration: Information Technology (MBAIT) Program exists to provide a quality graduate-level business education for professional adult students. This program seeks to equip and empower students with both the business and technical skills needed to successfully lead an IT organization as it supports the strategic and operational objectives of a business from a Christian world-view.

MBAIT Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students should be better equipped to effectively assume broad managerial responsibilities in a variety of organizational settings with specific understandings to the strategic and operational requirements of an IT organization.
  2. Students should process an advanced understanding of the specialized skills required to manage and grow an IT enterprise, including:
    1. an enhanced understanding of how to apply leadership skills in challenging organizational settings
    2. an expanded understanding of how to manage an IT enterprise in an ever-changing global environment
    3. an understanding of how to manage critical IT systems such as communication infrastructure, enterprise database systems, and financial applications
    4. the ability to solve complicated and realistic business problems by appropriately applying information technologies
    5. an understanding of how to apply IT governance to successfully implement and support business critical information technologies, and
    6. the application of quantitative methods and data analysis to business decision-making
  3. Students should show an increased ability to utilize quantitative techniques and explain theoretically how to apply the analysis to managerial decision.
  4. Students should possess an advanced set of skills as applied to the legal, financial, and accounting functions.

MBAIT Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission, applicants must:

  1. Submit a completed application.
  2. Have earned a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, with a cumulative undergraduate grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.7 or higher. Applicants must submit one official transcript from all colleges/universities attended (undergraduate and graduate work). These transcripts must be sent directly from the institution to College of Lifelong Learning Admissions, Trevecca Nazarene University, 333 Murfreesboro Rd., Nashville, TN 37210. All hours from regionally accredited institutions will be considered in calculating the cumulative GPA.
  3. Show competence in the following three content areas: Quantitative Analysis, Finance, and Accounting. These pre-requisite course requirements can be met in one of the following three ways:
    1. a transcript evaluation may reveal whether these requirements have been met through prior course work
    2. student can sign up to take the necessary classes in our current on-campus offerings
    3. the student can take the courses in Trevecca's virtual on-line program
  4. Demonstrate significant employment experience and competence via a résumé and letter of recommendation from the current employer.
  5. Submit two additional letters of recommendation. All letters of recommendation should comment on the applicant's academic and/or career performance and potential.
  6. Successfully pass the following assessment exams administered in the Office of the College of Lifelong Learning:
    1. A critical thinking skills analysis with a score of 17 or higher. This is a 35 question multiple choice test.
    2. Compose a 1-2 page double-spaced, typed document analyzing a current business problem. The document should contain a well-organized argument addressing the problem and should be a sample of the applicant's best writing. A passing score is 3.5 out of 5.
    3. A quantitative skills proficiency exam with a score of 76 percent or better. Please call to receive a study guide.

MBAIT Graduation Requirements

To receive the Master of Business Administration: Information Technology (MBAIT), a student must meet the following requirements:

  1. The required 44 semester hours of graduate credit must be completed with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. Note: grades for all graduate courses, including transfer credits, will be used to calculate the student's cumulative graduate grade-point average.
  2. No course or credit hours will count toward graduation if the grade earned is a C- or below.

Application for graduation must be completed by September 30 for December diplomas and by December 31 for May or August diplomas.

Graduation requirements are defined by the student's "graduation year" catalog or the catalog immediately preceding his/her graduation year.

Prerequisite Courses

Courses Required for MSM/MBA/MSIT

ACT 3080 - Foundations of Financial Accounting (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An introduction to financial accounting that teaches students how to use financial statements in the business decision-making process. Topics covered include, but are not limited to: Assets, liabilities, investments by owners, debt and equity instruments, income statements, distributions to owners, cash and accrual accounting, depreciation, inventory systems, cash flow, ratio analysis and annual reports. The course will also provide an introduction to fixed and variable costs as well as break-even analysis. This course will focus on what accounting information is, why it is important, and how it should be used.

BUS 3075 - Business Foundations (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Introduces students to the key functions of business organizations. Key areas of learning include management, marketing, economics, and statistics. Other important areas such as accounting and finance will also be given consideration. Students will learn the foundations of organizational and business function and their interrelationships.

CIT 2100 Business Programming I (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An IT core course designed to provide an in-depth, hands-on introduction to designing and developing software using business programming languages including Java and Visual Studio technologies. Design methodologies, object modeling with UML, structured programming, and data structures are also reviewed. Extensive lab time will help to develop skills needed when developing software in the business environment.

CIT 2500 IT Networking and Security (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Designed to introduce students to issues related to system and network security. Topics covered include access control, authentication, authorization, data security and integrity, encryption, recovery, computer forensics, and business continuance. Students will learn about and work with firewalls, network security, application security, e-mail security, and tools for security, monitoring, and auditing the IT environment.

CIT 2700 Database Design and Programming I (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An IT course designed to provide an in-depth, hands-on introduction to designing and implementing databases that use relational technologies with a significant market presence. Oracle, DB2, and/or MS SQL Server will receive significant coverage in the course. SQL and the various vendor extensions to the language will be covered. Extensive lab time will help to develop skills needed when designing and implementing databases in the business environment.

CIT 2800 Web Design and Scripting I (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Designed to teach the creation of Web sites using HTML/XHTML. Through case projects and individual projects, students will learn Web design and scripting with a practical hands-on approach. From rudimental concepts of Web scripting to advanced tasks such as Cascading Style Sheets, students learn the ins and outs of XHTML Web development while learning speed and efficiency.

FIN 3085- Foundations of Managerial Finance (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An introduction to the basics of business finance. Topics include breakeven analysis, leverage, short-term financial management, time value of money, cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital structure, bonds, preferred stock, and common stock. These topics will be covered from an introductory viewpoint and will give students the required foundation necessary to successfully complete an advanced course in this area. Prerequisite: ACT 3080 Foundations of Financial Accounting or equivalent.

Graduate Business Courses

Accounting Courses

ACT 6203 - Advanced Managerial Accounting (7 weeks - 3 semester hours)

A review of managerial accounting concepts and techniques used by managers in planning, performance evaluation, and decision-making. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following: classification of costs, determining costs of products, the study of cost behavior and its application in making business decisions, introduction to capital budgeting, operating budgets, standard costing, and the use of management accounting in evaluating business performance. Prerequisite: ACT 3080 Foundations of Financial Accounting or equivalent.

Business Courses

BUS 5010 - Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Provides participants with tools and techniques to perform data analysis and hypothesis in order to make data-based management decisions. Data collected from students' organizations is used throughout this course to answer practical, "real-world" research questions. Topics include basic statistics, control charts, one-sided mean tests, two-sided mean tests, variance comparison, correlation analysis, and introduction to design of experiments.

BUS 5013 - Organizational Behavior and Leadership (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Serves as the foundation for the program by providing a survey of key management theories and terminology. Both classical approaches and contemporary conceptualizations of management are studied. Special emphasis is placed on leadership, motivation, culture, team building, and organizational communication.

BUS 6013 - Business Ethics and Organizational Culture Development (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Analyzes and develops models for business culture development. Key components of ethics, vision, mission, and institutionalization of culture are addressed from a Christian world view. The use of the case-study method where real-life business situations, organizations, and cultures are examined for their foundation, and decision-making basis will play an important role. A key goal is to improve student's clarity and consistency in judging organizational models and developing plans for institutionalization of organizational ethical and cultural change.

BUS 6023 - Production and Operations Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Teaches students how to organize and manage labor, equipment, material, information systems, and resources required to deliver products that satisfy customer needs. It also provides business students with the understanding of manufacturing planning and control systems, continuous process improvement techniques, lean manufacturing methods, strategic quality management systems, and other manufacturing practices.

BUS 6033 - Organizational Strategy and Change (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An integrative course that focuses on the formulation of overall organizational policy within a dynamic, global environment. The perspective taken is that of top management, and the key questions are: "What industry are we in?" and "How do we successfully compete in this industry given its characteristics and our strengths?" This course also examines the means by which the aforementioned strategies can be implemented and successful ways to execute the inevitable changes that will accompany them. Special emphasis is placed on motivation and compensation, training, leadership and culture. In addition to examining various theoretical conceptualizations of change, several diagnostic tools will be utilized.

BUS 6073 - Data-Based Decision-Making (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Provides participants with tools and techniques to perform data analysis and hypothesis testing in order to make data-based management decisions. Data collected from students' organizations is used throughout this course to answer practical, "real-world" research questions. Topics include basic statistics, control charts, one-sided mean tests, two-sided mean tests, variance comparison, correlation analysis, and introduction to experimental design.

BUS 6100 - Human Resource Development and Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Analyzes the strategic role of the human resource function in relation to the company's overall objectives. The focus is how the company builds and maintains a work environment conducive to business performance excellence while enabling employees to develop and utilize their full potential. Key topics include employment law, the labor market, human resource planning and costing, HRIS, workforce diversity and EEOC, union/management and compensation systems, health/safety/security, employee rights and discipline, training and development.

BUS 6200 - Leadership and Strategic Planning for Servant Leaders (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Surveys models and best practices for organizational strategic planning, including leaders' roles in the planning process and in implementing the plan at various operational levels. Various methods for analyzing and solving problems, as well as decision-making strategies, are examined for utilization as change in organizations' operations becomes necessary. Using the servant-leadership model, learners will discern how to serve others while staying focused on achieving results in line with the organization's values and integrity.

BUS 6223 - The Legal Environment of Business (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Provides fundamental knowledge of legal concepts and principles important to business decision-making. Topics include the legal system, torts and product liability, contracts, agency, forms of business organization, employment law, and government regulation.

BUS 6300 - Special Project in Management (1- 3 credit hours)

Independent study.

Economics Course

ECO 5023 - Global and Economic Environment (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Familiarizes students with the economic forces, institutions, and policies that govern the environment in which business operates. Changes in both the national and global economy are explored from managerial, market and financial perspectives. Topics include opportunity cost, demand and supply, industrial organization, antitrust, deregulation, fiscal and monetary policies, trade policies, and exchange rates.

Finance Course

FIN 6213 - Advanced Managerial Finance (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Integrates many of the financial concepts that managers need to understand. These concepts include capital budgeting, break-even analysis, working capital management, financial instrument valuation, cost of capital, and the risk and return trade-off. Emphasis will be on the application of concepts and techniques in the analysis of cases. Prerequisite: FIN 3085 Foundations of Managerial Finance or equivalent.

Healthcare Administration Courses

HLT 6000 - Healthcare Policy and Systems (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Provides an overview of the influence of current healthcare delivery issues as well as provider and government issues that influence the delivery of healthcare. The design and structure of the delivery systems are discussed as well as the results of current turmoil in the healthcare delivery system. International and U.S. Healthcare issues including the influences of the overall system of delivery of healthcare, the roles of government, the private sector and the trends in consumer and advocacy group interests in the healthcare delivery process.

HLT 6200 - Legal and Regulatory Issues in Healthcare (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

The delivery of healthcare has been influenced by the legal issues surrounding the delivery, security, and research associated with the patient / provider relationship. The legal influences on the corporate healthcare environment will be presented. Discussions of the influences on the delivery process and policy will be reviewed, including, but not limited to, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX).

HLT 6400 - Quality Healthcare Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Outcome based healthcare delivery and case management have been topics of discussion for some time, and the influence on delivery and reimbursement will continue to impact the healthcare environment. Topics include the quality of care and the influencers, such as staff shortages, educational shortcomings and technology velocity, and their influence on healthcare delivery. Patient safety and patient satisfaction will be presented through current data on the topic and the results of quality initiatives such as the Healthcare-focused Baldrige award and audit process. The influences of the organizational efficiencies on healthcare delivery and the opposing healthcare delivery process on organizational efficiencies will be reviewed and discussed.

HLT 6600 - Healthcare Strategy (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

The delivery of healthcare in the U.S. has been influenced and changed significantly through the legislative process at the federal, state and local levels. The strategic planning of healthcare delivery has been significantly altered by these changes. This course will present and discuss the strategies available to address the changing landscape of healthcare delivery through the use and study of healthcare issues and how they will influence the future of healthcare delivery. Case studies will be a major portion of this course to determine how others have approached the policies in the past and how they have been impacted by the choices made.

Information Technology Courses

ITI 5073 - Management Information Systems (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Emphasizes computer systems technology and is designed to enable the learner to understand the field from a managerial perspective. Existing and emerging technologies will be reviewed to provide an awareness of technology capabilities from the managerial perspective. Topics to be covered include information systems planning, systems management, the systems development life cycle (SDLC), project management (P.M.), change management, networking and telecommunication concepts. Other topics to be discussed are transaction processing systems (TPS), decision support systems (DSS), executive information systems (EIS), enterprise resource planning (ERP), and artificial intelligence/expert systems AI/ES. Cases will be used to supplement the learning experience and to apply course principles and concepts. Project management and systems analysis methods will be thoroughly explored and applied in a learner-selected project where the learner carries out the project planning and implementation strategies/techniques to see the project to fruition.

ITI 6000 - IT Architecture (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores the discipline related to IT architecture and its basis. The key components of IT architecture are examined and considered in light of the organization needs and processes, which include application, security, data, and technology architectures.

ITI 6050 - Enterprise Computer Security and Forensics (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores design and development of a good enterprise computer security plan. Forensic techniques are given significant coverage so that recovery of digital evidence, exploration of network and system intrusion, and gathering of documentation can be conducted in a legal and ethical way.

ITI 6200 - Enterprise Database Systems (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Examines the fundamentals of database architecture, database management systems, and database systems in relation to the management of organizational data. Components, methodologies, and tools used to design and implement an enterprise database architecture are given significant coverage.

ITI 6260 - Data Warehousing and Mining (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores and uses the concepts, tools, and technologies associated with the design and implementation of enterprise data warehouses. Tools and techniques used in data mining of business data will also receive significant coverage.

ITI 6300 - IT Project Planning, Management and Financial Control (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Examines the key components of IT projects and it introduces the student to a variety of project planning, management, and financial control techniques that can be applied in an IT project context. Within this context students will explore the management of scope, time, cost and quality. The unique issues related to IT project management will also be discussed.

ITI 6330 - Enterprise Storage and Virtualization (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores Enterprise storage solutions, including network based and cloud storage techniques. In addition, students will explore practical enterprise virtualization options with an exploration of different tools and approaches to virtualization. Students will learn what security consideration should be reviewed in both virtualization and enterprise storage as well as what information is appropriate to store in various storage options.

ITI 6500 - IT Governance and Strategy (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An introduction to managing IT as a resource that creates business value. Using cases and research, students will discover how to determine what comprises a good IT investment portfolio. Students will also be introduced to a variety of IT governance structures and will focus on the important components to be considered when determining how one will govern an organization's information technology needs and resources. Key components to be considered include alignment of IT with the business, responsibility and accountability in the use of resources, consideration of risk and business continuance, and organizational compliance and performance.

ITI 6600 - IT Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Environment (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores the many legal, ethical and regulatory issues that come with using information technology. Key topics will include technology licensing and contracts, privacy, piracy, security, confidentiality, intellectual property rights, and internet regulation.

ITI 6700 - Advanced Web Development (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

The student will learn to use and integrate dynamic web content using both client side and server-based development technologies such as HTML5, AJAX, .NET, PHP, or J2EE. Open source content management tools, such as Joomla! and Drupal may also be explored. Students will consider some of the modern web development strategies and evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of these strategies.

ITI 6800 - Current Trends in IT (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Reviews current IT trends and how modern Information Technology is being utilized and leveraged in today's enterprise organization and small business. Students will explore current research in the IT industry and gain and understanding of advantages and disadvantages various IT decision have within the organization.

Marketing Courses

MKT 5093 - Marketing Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Focuses on the importance of modern organizations being market driven and globally competitive. It examines the role of the marketing function and fundamentals, such as market segmentation, targeting, product life cycle, new product planning, distribution strategies, pricing, promotion, forecasting, market analysis, and competitor analysis. Students conduct marketing audits of actual organizations.

Project Management Courses

PMI 6000 - Introduction to Project and Program Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Development of project scope, work breakdown structures, project planning and project budgets will be discussed and presented. Project Management tools and techniques will also be introduced to support the project development process. The Project Manager must maintain a knowledge of the current systems and solutions available to ensure successful project/product delivery. In addition to the waterfall techniques, the tools and processes that support Agile, Lean and Six Sigma will be reviewed and presented. Detailed discussions regarding the benefits and limitations of each technique and the supporting tools will be of value to the participant when presented with making choices regarding the selection, development and delivery of projects.

PMI 6200 - Project Schedule and Risk Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

The development of the sequencing and timing of project components and the risks associated at every point within the project must be understood and addressed. Recognition of the risk and the influence of the costs associated with risk, the scope challenges presented by the risk, and the schedule complexity that adds to and is influenced by risk must be understood by the successful Project Manager. Quantitative and qualitative techniques for risk management are components of Project Management, but the ability to recognize the threat is perhaps more critical. Threats can take the form of human, operational, procedural and technical threats or they may be political in nature. In any case, addressing threats and risks associated with these threats must be a tool in the Project Management arsenal.

PMI 6400 - Cost, Contract, and Procurement Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Many Project Managers are confused or sidetracked by the legalities of the cost management issues when utilizing contract or outsourced providers for portions of project delivery. The procurement process is often subjugated to the purchasing group(s) within the organization. The responsibility for the project cannot, however, be transferred to others. Therefore, the process must be understood and managed by the successful Project Manager. Most projects have some contract and procurement component that will influence the overall success of the project. With competitive bidding, technology advancements, and federal and state legal issues that influence the process of procurement, it is important that the Project Manager be aware of and knowledgeable in this aspect of the project process.

PMI 6600 - Advanced Project and Program Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

In addition to the basics of project delivery management, tools and techniques that are available for the Project Manager relative to project costs in terms of earned value, return on investment (ROI), cost-benefit analysis and other techniques used for project and selection and scheduling will be discussed in detail as they influence the progress of the project/product delivery. Risk management and the strategic alignment of the project and delivery process are also advanced topics that the successful Project Manager must be capable of controlling and utilizing throughout the project execution.

MBAIT Program Coursework

BUS 5000 - Organizational Behavior and Leadership (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Serves as the foundation for many of the proceeding courses in the program by providing a survey of key management theories and terminology. While contemporary conceptualizations of management are discussed, classical approaches are also examined. Special emphasis is placed in leadership, motivation, culture, team-building, and organizational communication.

ECO 5023 - Global and Economic Environment (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Familiarizes students with the economic forces, institutions, and policies that govern the environment in which business operates. Changes in both the national and global economy are explored from managerial, market and financial perspectives. Topics include opportunity cost, demand and supply, industrial organization, antitrust, deregulation, fiscal and monetary policies, trade policies, and exchange rates.

ITI 5073 - Management Information Systems (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Emphasizes computer systems technology and is designed to enable the learner to understand the field from a managerial perspective. Existing and emerging technologies will be reviewed to provide an awareness of technology capabilities from the managerial perspective. Topics to be covered include information systems planning, systems management, the systems development life cycle (SDLC), project management (P.M.), change management, networking and telecommunication concepts. Other topics to be discussed are transaction processing systems (TPS), decision support systems (DSS), executive information systems (EIS), enterprise resource planning (ERP), and artificial intelligence/expert systems AI/ES. Cases will be used to supplement the learning experience and to apply course principles and concepts. Project management and systems analysis methods will be thoroughly explored and applied in a learner-selected project where the learner carries out the project planning and implementation strategies/techniques to see the project to fruition.

MKT 5093 - Marketing Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Focuses on the importance of modern organizations being market driven and globally competitive. It examines the role of the marketing function and fundamentals, such as market segmentation, targeting, product life cycle, new product planning, distribution strategies, pricing, promotion, forecasting, market analysis, and competitor analysis. Students conduct marketing audits of actual organizations.

BUS 6023 - Production and Operations Management (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Teaches students how to organize and manage labor, equipment, material, information systems, and resources required to deliver products that satisfy customer needs. It also provides business students with the understanding of manufacturing planning and control systems, continuous process improvement techniques, lean manufacturing methods, strategic quality management systems, and other manufacturing practices.

BUS 6033 - Organizational Strategy and Change (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An integrative course that focuses on the formulation of overall organizational policy within a dynamic, global environment. The perspective taken is that of top management, and the key questions are: "What industry are we in?" and "How do we successfully compete in this industry given its characteristics and our strengths?" This course also examines the means by which the aforementioned strategies can be implemented and successful ways to execute the inevitable changes that will accompany them. Special emphasis is placed on motivation and compensation, training, leadership and culture. In addition to examining various theoretical conceptualizations of change, several diagnostic tools will be utilized.

ACT 6203 - Advanced Managerial Accounting (7 weeks - 3 semester hours)

A review of managerial accounting concepts and techniques used by managers in planning, performance evaluation, and decision-making. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following: classification of costs, determining costs of products, the study of cost behavior and its application in making business decisions, introduction to capital budgeting, operating budgets, standard costing, and the use of management accounting in evaluating business performance. Prerequisite: ACT 3080 Foundations of Financial Accounting or equivalent.

FIN 6213 - Advanced Managerial Finance (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Integrates many of the financial concepts that managers need to understand. These concepts include capital budgeting, break-even analysis, working capital management, financial instrument valuation, cost of capital, and the risk and return trade-off. Emphasis will be on the application of concepts and techniques in the analysis of cases. Prerequisite: FIN 3085 Foundations of Managerial Finance or equivalent.

ITI 6600 - IT Legal, Regulatory, and Ethical Environment (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores the many legal, ethical and regulatory issues that come with using information technology. Key topics will include technology licensing and contracts, privacy, piracy, security, confidentiality, intellectual property rights, and internet regulation.

ITI 6000 - IT Architecture (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Explores the discipline related to IT architecture and its basis. The key components of IT architecture are examined and considered in light of the organization needs and processes, which include application, security, data, and technology architectures.

ITI 6300 - IT Project Planning, Management and Financial Control (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Examines the key components of IT projects and it introduces the student to a variety of project planning, management, and financial control techniques that can be applied in an IT project context. Within this context students will explore the management of scope, time, cost and quality. The unique issues related to IT project management will also be discussed.

ITI 6200 - Enterprise Database Systems (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

Examines the fundamentals of database architecture, database management systems, and database systems in relation to the management of organizational data. Components, methodologies, and tools used to design and implement an enterprise database architecture are given significant coverage.

ITI 6500 - IT Governance and Strategy (6 weeks - 3 semester hours)

An introduction to managing IT as a resource that creates business value. Using cases and research, students will discover how to determine what comprises a good IT investment portfolio. Students will also be introduced to a variety of IT governance structures and will focus on the important components to be considered when determining how one will govern an organization's information technology needs and resources. Key components to be considered include alignment of IT with the business, responsibility and accountability in the use of resources, consideration of risk and business continuance, and organizational compliance and performance.

Graduate Business Program Administration

JAMES T. HIATT, J.D., M.B.A.
Dean, School of Business and Technology

RICK MANN, B.S., M.Div., M.A., Ph.D., M.B.A.
Director, Graduate and Professional Studies

Graduate Business Faculty

Full-time Faculty

JAMES E. AGEE, III, Associate Professor of Management, 2000--
B.B.A., Eastern Nazarene University, 1994; Ph.D., University at Albany, 2000; M.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005.

RICK MANN, Director of Graduate and Professional Studies; Professor of Leadership and Strategy, 2013--
B.S., Western Michigan University, 1979; M.Div., Canadian Theological Seminary 1983; M.A., Ohio State University, 1986; Ph.D., Ohio State University 1986; M.B. A., University of Minnesota, 2009.

JONATHAN B. BURCH, Associate Professor of Management and Leadership, 2000--
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1997; M.B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2006; Ed.D., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2003.

KENNETH J. BURGER, Professor of Marketing and Management, 2003--
B.S., North Dakota State University, 1967; M.B.A., Kent State University, 1971; D.B.A., University of Kentucky, 1981.

JAMES T. HIATT, Dean, School of Business and Technology; Professor of Business, 1983--
B.S., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1976; J.D., University of Tennessee, 1979; M.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1991.

J. ALLEN JINNETTE, Associate Professor of Accounting, 2004--
B.B.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1992; M.S., Middle Tennessee State University, 1993; C.P.A., Tennessee, 1994; M.P.A., Georgia State University, 2000; Ph.D. The University of Mississippi, 2010.

MICHAEL J. LEIH, Chair, Department of Information Technology; Associate Professor of Information Technology, 2009--
B.A., Point Loma Nazarene University, 1988; M.S., California State University at Fullerton, 1994; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University, 2009.

MARY ANN MEINERS, Professor of Economics, 1990--
B.S., Georgetown 1975; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1988.

TIMOTHY S. MYATT, Associate Professor of Information Technology, 2012--
M.S., The Ohio State University, 1983; M.B.A., Mount Vernon Nazarene University, 2010.

GREG RUNYAN, Chair, Department of Business Administration; Associate Professor of Business, 1987--
B.S., Trevecca Nazarene University, 1979; C.M.A., C.F.M., C.P.A., Tennessee; M.B.A., Tennessee State University, 1989.

TY J. TABERNIK, Associate Professor of Information Technology, 2006--
B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2000; M.S., Purdue University, 2002; M.B.A., Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005; Ph.D., Capella University, 2008.

SCOTT D. WARD, Professor of Finance, 2006--
B.S., University of Southern California, 1980; M.B.A., Indiana University, 1982; M.A., University of Rochester, 1988; Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1992.

Part-time Faculty

TODD G. COLE, 2012--
B.A., Brown University, 1991; M.B.A., Emory University, 1994; J.D., NOVA Southeastern University, Shepard Broad Law Center, 2007.