Department of Science and Mathematics

FACULTY

R. ALAN SMITH, Coordinator, Department of Science and Mathematics, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2006—
BA, Cumberland College, 1991; MS, University of Tennessee, 1994; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2003.

STEPHEN M. BLAKEMAN, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1993—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1977; MA, Indiana University, 1987.

ALFRED B. CAWTHORNE, III, Assistant Professor of Physics, 2006—
BS, Eastern Nazarene College, 1992; PhD, University of Maryland, 1998.

E. CHRISTIS FARRELL, Director of Medical Technology Program, Professor of Biology, 1995—
BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1961; MS, The Ohio State University, 1968; PhD, The Ohio State University, 1971.

SHANE KELLEY, Associate Professor of Chemistry, 2000—
BSC, Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne, 1994; PhD, University of Tennessee, 2000.

MONICA A. PARKER, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2006—
BS, California State University, Long Beach, 1994; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2002.

SAMUEL K. STUECKLE, Professor of Mathematics, 1996—
BS, Northwest Nazarene University, 1980; PhD, Clemson University, 1986.

Department of Science and Mathematics General Information

The following majors are offered by the Department of Science and Mathematics: Biology, Biology Education, Chemistry, Chemistry Education, Financial Mathematics, General Science, Mathematics, Mathematics Education, Physics, and Physics Education. This department offers minors in Biology, Environmental Science, Chemistry, Physical Science, Physics, General Science, and Mathematics. The courses offered are designed to provide a database allowing the student to apply that knowledge in a professional or graduate school or in the field of teaching.

Mission Statements and Learning Outcomes for Academic Majors in Science and Mathematics

Biology Major

Mission Statement

The biology major seeks to prepare graduates who have a broad-based understanding of biology, including experimental and analytical laboratory techniques, that will prepare them to succeed professionally and in graduate/professional programs.

Chemistry Major

Mission Statement

The chemistry major seeks to prepare graduates who have a broad-based understanding of chemistry, including experimental and analytical techniques, that will prepare them to succeed professionally and in graduate/professional programs.

Physics Major

Mission Statement

The physics major seeks to prepare students with a foundational knowledge of analytical thinking, data collection and analysis, and experimental skills. This knowledge is coupled with acquiring understanding of the fundamental laws of the physical universe in a nurturing Christian environment. Development of the whole person for leadership and/or service roles is emphasized.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Majors will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and principles in the major.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills in experimental and analytical techniques including health and safety precautions for laboratory procedures.
  3. Clearly communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in use of computers and related technology for applications in collecting, analyzing, and reporting data and in making presentations.
  5. Apply analytical and critical thinking to solving problems related to the major and to promote lifelong learning.
  6. Apply Christian principles to ethical and moral issues related to their major.
  7. Advance in their chosen professions and/or be admitted to and be successful in graduate/professional programs.

General Science Major

Mission Statement

The general science major seeks to prepare graduates who have a breadth of basic knowledge in biology, chemistry, and physics including laboratory techniques.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a General Science major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and principles in biology, chemistry, and physics according to the levels of courses completed in each subject area.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills in experimental and analytical techniques including health and safety precautions for laboratory procedures.
  3. Clearly communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in use of computers and related technology for applications in collecting, analyzing, and reporting data and in making presentations.
  5. Apply analytical and critical thinking to solving problems related to at least two of the areas of biology, chemistry, and physics and to promote life long learning.
  6. Apply Christian principles to ethical and moral issues related to biology, chemistry, and/or physics.
  7. Advance in their chosen professions and/or be admitted to and be successful in graduate/professional programs.

Mathematics Major

Mission Statement

The mathematics major seeks to prepare graduates who are competent in reasoning and problem solving skills that will prepare them for success in technical professions and in graduate studies.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mathematics major will be able to:

  1. Understand and construct mathematical proofs.
  2. Solve significant problems using mathematical methods and appropriate technology.
  3. Clearly express mathematical ideas, both verbally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate a comprehensive view of mathematics.

Mission Statements for Biology Education, Chemistry Education, Mathematics Education, and Physics Education are in the Teacher Education Programs Section of the Catalog.

Financial Mathematics Major

Mission Statement

The mathematics major seeks to prepare graduates who are competent in reasoning and problem solving skills that will prepare them for success in technical professions and in graduate studies.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mathematics major will be able to:

  1. Understand and construct mathematical proofs.
  2. Solve significant problems using mathematical methods and appropriate technology.
  3. Clearly express mathematical ideas, both verbally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate a comprehensive view of mathematics.

Mission Statements for Biology Education, Chemistry Education, Mathematics Education, and Physics Education are in the Teacher Education Programs Section of the Catalog.

Biology BS

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science, Mathematics, and Computer Literacy components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division biology courses.

Major

35 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

BIO

2100

Principles of Cell Biology

(3) or (4)

 

 

or

 

BIO/
CHE

3520/
3520

Biochemistry II

 

BIO

2820

Microbiology

(4)

BIO

3000

General Ecology

(3)

BIO

3720

Genetics I

(3)

BIO

3730

Genetics II

(3)

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

Biology Electives

(9) or (10)

Required Support Courses:

30 or 31 hours

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

MAT

1310

Precalculus (3)

(3 or 4)

 

 

or

 

MAT

1510

Calculus I (4)

 

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

Chemistry Minor

 

Chemistry Courses

(20*)

 

General Electives

(7-9)

*16 of the 20 hours will be completed as a part of the biology

major requirements (support courses)

Minor Other than Chemistry

15 -20 hours

Total

120-127 hours

Biology Major with Chemistry Minor (Pre-Professional) Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

MAT

1055

College Algebra or General Elective

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 16

Semester 2

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

MAT

1310

Pre-Calculus or General Elective

(3)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

BIO

2820

Microbiology

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

 

 

Behavioral Science Choice

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

HIS

1400

World Civilizations

(3)

BIO

 

Elective

(3-4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

Total 15-16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

CHE

3510

Biochemistry I*

(3-4)

 

 

or

 

CHE

 

Chemistry Elective

 

PHL

 

Introduction to Philosophy or Ethics

(3)

 

Total 14-15

Semester 6

 

BIO

2100

Cell Biology*

(4)

 

 

or

 

BIO

3520

Biochemistry II

 

BIO

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

Total 14-15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

BIO

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

BIO

3720

Genetics I

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Institutional Choice

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

Total 14-16

Semester 8

 

ALH

3060

Medical Terminology

(1)

BIO

3000

Ecology*

(3)

BIO

3730

Genetics II

(3)

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 14

Total credit hours for major

118-123

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or senior year)

Chemistry BS

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science, Mathematics, and Computer Literacy components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division chemistry courses.

Major

37 hours

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2530

Analytical Chemistry

(4)

CHE

3220

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

(4)

CHE

3510

Biochemistry I

(4)

 

 

or

 

CHE

3520

Biochemistry II

 

CHE

4010

Physical Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

4020

Physical Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

4335

Seminar in Chemistry

(1)

Required Support Courses:

27 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

Minor

15-20 hours

(Minor in Biology, Physics, or Math is desirable.)

Total

121-127 hours

Chemistry Major with Biology Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

 

Total 16

Semester 2

 

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

BIO

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

SCI

2150

Introduction of Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

Total 16-18

Semester 4

 

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

BIO

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

REL

2000

Biblical Faith

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

Total 17-18

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

CHE

2530

Analytical Chemistry*

(4)

BIO

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

CHE

3220

Inorganic Chemistry*

(4)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Institutional Choice

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

Total 13

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

CHE

4010

Physical Chemistry I*

(4)

CHE/ BIO

3510

Biochemistry I*

(4)

PHL

 

Philosophy/Ethics

(3)

 

 

Behavioral Science Choice

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 16

Semester 8

 

CHE

4020

Physical Chemistry II*

(4)

CHE/ BIO

3520

Biochemistry II*

(4)

CHE

4335

Senior Seminar

(1)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours for major

123-127

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or Senior year)

Chemistry Major with Physics Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

 

Total 16

Semester 2 Spring

 

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction of Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

REL

2000

Biblical Faith

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

Total 17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

CHE

2530

Analytical Chemistry*

(4)

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Language

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 6

 

CHE

3220

Inorganic Chemistry*

(4)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(4)

 

 

Institutional Choice

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

Total 16

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

CHE

4010

Physical Chemistry I*

(4)

CHE/ BIO

3510

Biochemistry I*

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

 

Physics Elective

 

PHL

 

Introduction to Philosophy or Ethics

(3)

 

 

Behavioral Choice

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 8

 

CHE/ PHY

4020

Physical Chemistry II*

(4)

CHE/ BIO

3520

Biochemistry II*

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

 

Physics Elective

 

CHE

4335

Senior Seminar

(1)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours for major

124

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or Senior year)

Chemistry Education BS (7-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Programs section of the Catalog.

Physics BS

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science, Mathematics, and Computer Literacy components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division physics courses.

Major

33 hours

 

 

 

 

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY

2140

Intermediate Mechanics

(4)

PHY

2150

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

(4)

PHY

3130

Circuits

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

 

PHY

4010

Thermodynamics

(4)

 

 

or 4 hours selected from physics courses numbered 2000 or above

 

PHY

4020

Modern Physics

(4)

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

PHY

4330

Special Projects in Physics

(1)

 

 

or

 

PHY

4510

Career Internship in Physics

 

PHY

2040

Environmental Physics

(3)

 

 

or 3 hours selected from Physics courses numbered 2000 or above

 

Required Support Courses:

19 hours

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

PHY 3500/

ITI 3500

Object-Oriented Programming in C++

(3)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

Minor

15-20 hours

A minor in mathematics or computer science is strongly advised for physics majors.

General Electives

5-11 hours

Total

120 hours

Physics Major with Mathematics Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 2 Spring

 

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

 

Total 14

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

 

 

Behavioral Science Choice

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

PHY

 

Physics Elective

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

PHL

 

Introduction to Philosophy or Ethics

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PHY

4010

Thermodynamics*

(4)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

PHY

4020

Modern Physics*

(4)

PHY

3500

C++

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

Total 15-16

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

PHY

2140

Intermediate Mechanics*

(4)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

 

Institutional Choice

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 8

 

PHY

2150

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism*

(4)

PHY

4330

Special Projects in Physics

(1)

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours for major

121-122

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or senior year)

Physics Education BS (7-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

General Science BS

General Education

45 or 46 hours

The Laboratory Science, Mathematics, and Computer Literacy components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses.

Major

33 hours

Biology

(8)

Chemistry

(8)

Physics

(8)

Science Electives
(must be at 3000/4000 level courses)

(8)

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

 

 

or

 

CHE

4335

Seminar in Chemistry

 

 

 

or

 

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

 

Required Support Courses:

10 - 11 hours

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1310

Precalculus (3)

(3 or 4)

 

 

or

 

MAT

1510

Calculus I (4)

 

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

Minor

15-20 hours

General Electives

10-17 hours

Total

120 hours

General Science Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1055

College Algebra

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Elective

 

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2 Spring (Even years)

 

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

MAT

1310

Pre-Calculus

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Elective

 

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

 

 

Behavioral Science

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 4

 

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

PHL

 

Introduction to Philosophy or Ethics

(3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PHY

1010

Basic College Physics I

(4)

 

 

Science Elective

(3-4)

 

 

Institutional Choice

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

PHY

1020

Basic College Physics II

(4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

 

 

Science Elective

(3-4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 8

 

BIO/ CHE/ PHY

4335

Seminar in Biology/
Chemistry/Physics

(1)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Science Elective

(3-4)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 13-14

Total credit hours for major

122-126

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or senior year)

Science Minors

Biology Minor

20 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

 

 

Biology Electives

(12)

Chemistry Minor
(strongly advised for biology majors)

20 hours

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

 

 

Chemistry Electives

(4)

General Science Minor

20 hours

Biology

(4)

Chemistry

(4)

Physics

(4)

Science Electives

(8)

Environmental Science Minor

21 hours

Hours to be taken at TNU

9 hours

BIO

3000

General Ecology

(3)

SCI

2200

Physical Geology

(3)

PHY

2040

Environmental Physics

(3)

At Au Sable Institute (one summer spent at the Institute)

12 hours

Limnology required

(4)

Environmental Chemistry required

(4)

Choose one of the following:

(4)

 

Wetland Ecology (4)

 

 

Conservation Biology (4)

 

 

Aquatic Biology (4)

 

Physical Science Minor

20 hours

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

 

 

Physical Science Electives

(4)

Physics Minor

20 hours

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY

4020

Modern Physics

(4)

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

 

 

Electives in upper division physics

(4)

Mathematics BS

General Education

51-53 hours

The Mathematics component of the General Education curriculum is fulfilled by a course required for this major.

Major

35 hours

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

 

 

Choose one of the following two options:

 

Pure Mathematics Concentration (Option 1)

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis

(3)

MAT

4060

Modern Algebra

(3)

Choose three of the following:

(9)

 

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3)

 

MAT

3010

Discrete Methods (3)

 

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research (3)

 

MAT

3080

Foundations of Geometry (3)

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations (3)

 

MAT

4110

Topics in Mathematics (3)

Applied Mathematics Concentration (Option 2)

 

Choose one of the following:

(3)

 

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis (3)

 

MAT

4060

Modern Algebra (3)

Choose four of the following:

(12)

 

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3)

 

MAT

3010

Discrete Methods (3)

 

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research (3)

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations (3)

 

MAT

4110

Topics in Mathematics (3)

Minor

15-20 hours

Students choosing Option 2 are encouraged to minor in physics, chemistry, or economics/finance.

General Electives

12-19 hours

Total

120 hours

Mathematics Four-Year Plan

For even years swap the math classes in Years 3 and 4.

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

PHY

2100

General Physics I (minor)

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

 

 

General Education

(4)

 

Total 15

Semester 2 Spring (Even years)

 

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

 

 

Minor Courses

(3-4)

 

 

General Education

(6)

 

Total 17-18

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

 

 

General Education

(9)

 

Total 16-17

Semester 4

 

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(9)

Total 15-16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

MAT

3010

Discrete Methods*

(3)

MAT

4030

Real Analysis*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(6)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

MAT

3090

Introduction to Linear Algebra*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(9)

Total 15-16

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics*

(3)

MAT

4060

Modern Algebra*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(6)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 8

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations*

(3)

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research*

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(5)

 

Total 12

Total credit hours for major

120-126

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or senior year)

Financial Mathematics BS

General Education

55-57 hours

MAT 1510 Calculus I will be taken to satisfy the mathematics requirement in the Foundations Tier and ECO 2000 Principles of Macroeconomics will be taken to satisfy the Institutional Choice in the Human Sciences Tier.

Major

44-46 hours

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics

(3)

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research

(3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

4510

Career Internship in Mathematics

(1-3)

ACT

2210

Principles of Accounting I

(3)

ECO

2010

Principles of Microeconomics

(3)

ECO

3260

Managerial Economics

(3)

BUS

3025

Statistics for Business and Economics II

(3)

BUS

3400

Investments

(3)

BUS

4030

Business Finance

(3)

Minor

15-18 hours

General Electives

0-6 hours

Total

120 hours

Financial Mathematics Four-Year Plan

For even years swap the math classes in Years 3 and 4.

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

ACT

2210

Principles of Accounting I

(3)

ECO

2000

Principles of Macroeconomics

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

 

 

General Education

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 2 Spring (Even years)

 

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

1400

Perspectives on Mathematics

(1)

ECO

2010

Principles of Microeconomics

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading, Writing, Thinking

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

Total 14

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

General Education

(6)

 

Total 16

Semester 4

 

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research*

(3)

BUS

3025

Statistics for Business and Economics II

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

MAT

4030

Real Analysis*

(3)

BUS

3400

Investments

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(6)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

MAT

3090

Introduction to Linear Algebra*

(3)

BUS

4030

Business Finance

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(6)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

MAT

4510

Career Internship in Mathematics

(3)

ECO

3260

Managerial Economics

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(6)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations*

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(10)

 

Total 14

Total credit hours for major

120

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either Junior or senior year)

Mathematics Education BS (K-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog for description.

Mathematics Minor

The Mathematics component of the General Education curriculum is fulfilled by courses required for this minor.

Minor in Mathematics

18 hours

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

 

Math electives 2500 level and above

(10)

Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental/Pre-Veterinary/Pre-Physician Assistant

Students typically major in either Biology or Chemistry with a minor in the other.

One year of General Physics is required. Individual counseling is given to each student as needed. Students are responsible for obtaining specific course requirements for the medical, dental, veterinary, and physician assistant programs to which they are planning to apply.

Pre-Pharamacy

The Pre-Professional Education requirements for a Doctor of Pharmacy Program may be taken at Trevecca. The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy requires 90 hours for admission; the specific requirements are listed below.

Applicants who have completed a degree are given preference in the UT Program. Students who plan to apply to other institutions should be aware of specific course requirements.

Prerequisites for U.T. College of Pharmacy

Hours

General Chemistry I and II

8

Organic Chemistry I and II

8

Biochemistry I and II

6

General Biology or Zoo I and II

8

Anatomy-Physiology I and II

8

Microbiology

4

Immunology

3

Physics

4

English Composition

6

Calculus

3

Statistics

3

Communications or Speech

3

Social Science Electives

6

Humanities Electives

6

General Electives

14

Total

90

Trevecca Nazarene University/Vanderbilt University Pre-Engineering—Engineering 3-2 Program

Students who wish to combine study in a pre-engineering program with further study in an engineering discipline may do so under the Trevecca Nazarene University/ Vanderbilt University 3-2 Program. Under this cooperative agreement, a student will spend the first three years of his or her college career at Trevecca Nazarene University in a pre-engineering program with a concentration in the area of mathematics or science and the remaining two years at Vanderbilt University studying in one of the engineering programs. The available engineering programs are Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. A student who completes this five-year program will have had the experience of dividing an academic career between the pre-engineering environment of a Christian liberal arts university and the engineering climate in a professional school. This unique combination of study on two differently oriented campuses will provide the student with excellent engineering training.

The participating student will spend the first three years completing the basic general education requirements and the major requirements for either a mathematics, physics, chemistry or biology (for Biomedical Engineering) major at Trevecca Nazarene University, plus an appropriate minor.

After completion of the pre-engineering program at Trevecca Nazarene University and after successful completion of one academic year of prescribed study in the engineering discipline at Vanderbilt, the student will be awarded a Bachelor of Science degree with an appropriate major by Trevecca Nazarene University. After successfully completing the fifth year, the student will be awarded the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Engineering degree, as applicable to his or her major program, by Vanderbilt University.

Pre-Engineering for Students Planning to Transfer to a University other than Vanderbilt

First Year Required

33 hours

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY/
ITI

3500

Object-Oriented Programming in C++

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

 

*Electives

(2)

Second Year Required

31 hours

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

 

 

*Electives

(13)

Total

64 hours

*Students should choose electives according to requirements of the institution to which they plan to transfer for completion of their engineering degree. Usually this choice will mean carefully selecting courses from a variety of areas—e.g. social sciences, humanities, fine arts, etc.—to meet general education requirements. Each student should bring a copy of the institution's catalog to be used with the TNU advisor during registration counseling.

Science and Math Courses

BIOLOGY

BIO 1510 is a prerequisite to higher numbered biology courses except where noted.

BIO 1300—Principles of Biology (4)

An introduction to the biological sciences with a particular emphasis placed on concepts relevant to the health sciences. Biomolecules, cell structure and function, metabolism, cellular basis of reproduction, genetics, microbiology, animal morphology, and animal tissues and organ systems will be studied in detail. An introduction to evolution and ecology will also be included. Biology-related social and ethical issues encountered in the health professions will also be discussed. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 1510—General Biology I (4)

An introduction to fundamental concepts in the biological sciences including the organization of living matter, cellular structure and function, food production by photosynthesis, energy harvest, mechanisms of cellular reproduction, genetics, and evolution. Discussions of current scientific issues will also be included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 1520—General Biology II (4)

A study of diverse structures and functions observed in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, with emphasis placed on plants and vertebrates. The study of the Kingdom Plantae will include investigation of plant life cycles and reproductive strategies. Topics including respiration, digestion, and reproduction will be introduced in the study of vertebrate animals. An introduction to ecology and the impact of humans on a variety of organisms will also be included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 2010—Anatomy-Physiology I (4)

A study that includes the anatomy of the body as a whole. Emphasis will be on anatomical structures and organizational relationships of the organs and systems of the body. General physiology of each system and the major influence systems have on one another is emphasized. Laboratory studies include dissection of the cat and study of various skeletons, models, and charts. Emotional, psychomotor and physical well being are included in the cognitive aspect of this course. Prerequisite: BIO 1510. Lecture and lab. Fee charged

BIO 2020—Anatomy-Physiology II (4)

A study that includes some anatomy, especially histology and embryology, as necessary for understanding physiology. Emphasis will be on physiological processes of all body organs and systems. Emotional, psychomotor, and physical well being are important cognitive aspects of physiology. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 2010 or equivalent. Fee charged.

BIO 2100—Principles of Cell Biology (3)

A survey of cellular structure and function. Topics will include energy conversions, cell replication, vesicular formation and transport, membrane structure and function, cell motility, and cell communication. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 151020. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged.

BIO 2700—Nutrition (3)

A study of how chemical principles and biochemical pathways create certain nutritional requirements for humans in various states of health and disease. Emphasis will be given to the needs of pregnancy, infancy, adolescence, sports conditioning, maturity, and nutritional therapy in some disease states. The possible benefits of proper nutritional practices for our culture, wellness programs, and managed care will be discussed. The world-wide impact of hunger and disease and our responsibility for relief will be pursued. The laboratory will include various measurements and profiling of nutritional status on the individual students. CHE 1010 or CHE 1040 recommended. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged.

BIO 2820—Microbiology (4)

A survey of microscopic organisms with emphasis on bacteria and fungi. Classification, morphology, cultivation, and identification will be studied in both lecture and lab. The role of these organisms in the ecosystem, industry, and disease will also be discussed. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 1510. Fee charged.

BIO 3000—General Ecology (3)

A course that promotes a basic understanding of the ecosystem as a whole. The study will include interactions of ecosystem constituents (both community and population), their contributions and/or detriments to the ecosystem, biogeochemical cycles, and energy flow through ecosystems. Aquatic and terrestrial habitats will be studied both in lecture and in laboratory field trips. Prerequisite: BIO 1510-20 and CHE 1010-20 or CHE 1040-50 or equivalents. (Spring, odd numbered years). Fee charged.

BIO 3010—Histology (3)

A study of mammalian tissue and microscopic identification of cells, tissues and organs. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 1510-20 or equivalent. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged.

BIO 3510—Biochemistry I (4)

First course in a comprehensive biochemistry sequence. Topics of study will include the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; enzyme mechanics; the kinetics and regulation of biological reactions; and the principles of bioenergetics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: CHE 2010 or equivalent. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 3510.

BIO 3520—Biochemistry II (4)

A study of metabolic pathways and their regulation; nucleic acid structure, function and processing; regulation of gene expression; and current technologies used to study and combat diseases resulting from deficiencies in normal biochemical processes. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 3510/CHE 3510. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 3520.

BIO 3610—Parasitology (3)

A study of the medically important parasites of humans. Classification, morphology, life cycle, and host-parasite interaction will be considered. Laboratory will involve identification of the various organisms studied. Lectures and lab. Prerequisites: BIO 1510 and 1520 or BIO 2820. (Spring, odd numbered years.) Fee charged.

BIO 3620—Immunology (3)

A study of the human immune system. The structure, physiology, and basic immunity principles will be discussed. Modern research and theories will be incorporated into the lecture. Basic immunological laboratory tests and procedures will be the focus of the lab. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 2820 ( 2010, and 2020 strongly recommended). (Fall, even numbered years.) Fee charged.

BIO 3720—Genetics I (3)

Mendelian (classical) genetics is emphasized. Additional topics include chromosome mapping in eukaryotes, chromosomal mutations, extranuclear inheritance, quantitative genetics, and population genetics. Genetic principles are applied to selected human traits as well as those of other organisms. Several genetic disorders of humans are considered. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 3730—Genetics II (3)

Molecular genetics is emphasized. Topics include DNA structure, replication, and variation; expression and regulation of genetic information; recombinant DNA technology; and applications and ethics of biotechnology. Selected techniques in molecular genetics are included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 4110—Topics in Biology (1-3)

In-depth coverage of one topic in the biological sciences with regard to the interest of the instructor and students. Possible topics include botany, zoology, seminal papers in biology, mathematics of biology, biotechnology, and instrumental methods and analysis. Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit. Offered as needed.

BIO 4330—Special Projects in Biology (1-3)

Open to biology majors and minors with advanced standing. Individual study in a chosen field under the supervision of the faculty member in that area of biology. Prerequisite: BIO 1510-20 plus the advanced course in the area of study. Non-majors may take course by special permission.

BIO 4335—Seminar in Biology (1)

Includes project and papers presented and reported to the science faculty and science majors. To be taken during senior year.

BIO 4340—Research Projects in Biology (1-3)

Limited to biology majors and minors. Individual or small group research in selected field. Research is under supervision of a faculty member in biology. Prerequisite: beginning courses in major/minor, plus courses pertinent to area of research.

BIO 4510—Career Internship in Biology (1-3)

Work in off-campus facility under faculty supervision. Limited to juniors and seniors. Supervision coordinated with Career Planning Office. Maximum 6 hours. Graded S/U.

GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY––MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY COURSES

Trevecca has an affiliation with the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. The following courses may be taken during the summer at GCRL and the credits transferred to Trevecca. These courses can then be used to fulfill the biology elective requirements of a biology major or a biology minor. The courses listed below are offered each summer. Consult the Coast Research Laboratory summer catalog at www.usm.edu/gcrl for a complete schedule of courses and additional information.

Oceanography (5)

Marine Biology (5)

Marine Mammals (5)

Marine Ecology (5)

Marine Invertebrate Zoology (6)

Marine Icthyology (6)

AU SABLE INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Trevecca is a participating university with Au Sable Institute, which is a member of the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities. Through this affiliation students may enroll in courses at the Institute, and the credits will be transferred to Trevecca. Sustainable global development is emphasized in all courses. Biology courses can fulfill biology electives for the biology major and for the biology minor. Twelve hours from Au Sable are required for the environmental science minor.

Au Sable offers courses in the Great Lakes, the Everglades, Puget Sound, Kenya, and India. The courses listed below are typically offered during May, Summer I, and Summer II sessions. Consult the Au Sable Institute catalog at www.AuSable.org for a complete schedule of courses and additional information.

EnvSt/Biol/Bus 243 The Ecology of Commerce (3)

Biol/Geog 266 Field Biology of the Pacific Northwest (4)

Biol/Geol/Geog 301 Land Resources (4)

Biol 302 Limnology (4)

Biol/Agri/Geog 303 Ecological Agriculture: Farms and Gardens for Sustainability (4)

Biol/Geog 304 Global Development and Ecological Sustainability (4)

Biol 305 Ornithology: Eastern Birds (4)

Biol 306 Ornithology: Western Birds (4)

Biol/Geog 308 Development and Ecological Sustainability in Africa (4)

Biol/Geol/Geog 309 Land Resources of South India (4)

Biol 311 Field Botany (4)

Biol 312 Insect Biology and Ecology (4)

Biol 315 Woody Plants (4)

Biol 319 Tropical Botany (4)

Biol 321 Animal Ecology (4)

Biol 322 Aquatic Biology (4)

Biol/EnvSt/Geog 326 Town and Country Stewardship Planning (4)

Biol 330 Birds and Mammals of South India (4)

Biol 331 Birds and Mammals of East Africa (4)

Chem 332 Environmental Chemistry (4)

Biol 333 Summer Flora (4)

Biol 342 Fish Biology and Ecology (4)

Biol/Agri/Geog 343 Tropical Agriculture and Missions (4)

Biol/EnvSt/Phl 351 Bioethics: Bridge to the Future (4)

EnvSt/Biol/Int 353 Appropriate Technology and Stewardship Praxis (3)

Biol 359 Marine Mammals (4)

Biol 361 Natural History in Spring (4)

Biol 377 Marine Invertebrates (4)

EnvSt/Educ 380 Principles of Environmental Education and Interpretation (4)

Biol/Chem/Geog 390 Directed Individual Study (1-4)

Biol/Geog/Agri 403 Ecology of African Agriculture (4)

Biol 411 Advanced Field Biology (4)

Biol 450 Introduction to Tropical Medicine (4)

Biol/Geog 457 Bioregional Models for Environmental Stewardship (4)

Biol/Geog 471 Conservation Biology (4)

Biol 477 Plant Ecology (4)

Biol 478 Alpine Ecology: Life in Context of Snow and Ice (4)

Biol 479 Tropical Mountain Ecology (4)

Biol 482 Restoration Ecology (4)

Biol 486 Land Stewardship Ecology (4)

Biol 487 Forest Ecology (4)

Biol 488 Wetland Ecology (4)

Biol/Geol/Geog/Soc 489 Biosphere Science (4)

Biol/Chem/Geog 499 Research (1-6)

CHEMISTRY

Cognitive skills are emphasized in the chemistry courses, and some psychomotor skills are learned in the laboratory portions of each course.

CHE 1010—Principles of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry (4)

Includes the basic principles of inorganic chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry. Designed primarily for pre-nursing students. May also be taken for General Education credit. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 1020—Principles of Organic and Biochemistry (4)

Continuation of organic chemistry CHE 1010 and study of biochemical compounds and their reactions. Prerequisite: CHE1010. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 1040-1050—General Chemistry I, II (4), (4)

A sequence for students planning further work in chemistry. Topics discussed include chemical notation, atomic structures, periodic relationships, bonding, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases, salts, redox reactions, electrochemistry, environmental chemistry, and qualitative analysis. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 2010-2020—Organic Chemistry I, II (4),(4)

An introduction to the study of the compounds of carbon-their classification, nomenclature, preparation, and reactions. Prerequisite: one year of college chemistry. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 2300—Principles of Analytic Chemistry (3)

A study of volumetric, gravimetric and instrumental methods of analysis. Lecture only. Fall, even numbered years.

CHE 2530—Analytical Chemistry (4)

A study of volumetric, gravimetric, and instrumental methods of analysis. Lecture and lab. (Fall, even numbered years). Fee charged.

CHE 3210—Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry (2)

A laboratory course open to advanced students in chemistry. Inorganic compounds are prepared in pure conditions. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1050 or equivalent. 6 hours Laboratory. Offered on demand. Fee charged.

CHE 3220—Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4)

Descriptive chemistry of the metallic and nonmetallic elements, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and industrial inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1050 or equivalent. Lecture and lab. (Spring, odd-numbered years). Fee charged.

CHE 3510—Biochemistry (4)

First course in a comprehensive biochemistry sequence. Topics of study will include the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; enzyme mechanics; the kinetics and regulation of biological reactions; and the principles of bioenergetics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: CHE 2010 or equivalent. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as BIO 3510.

CHE 3520—Biochemistry II (4)

A study of metabolic pathways and their regulation; nucleic acid structure, function and processing; regulation of gene expression; and current technologies used to study and combat diseases resulting from deficiencies in normal biochemical processes. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 3510/CHE 3510. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as BIO 3520.

CHE 4000—Principles of Physical Chemistry (3)

A study of three laws of thermodynamics, phase equalibria, and reaction equilibria. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, PHY 2110, and CHE 1040-50. Lecture only. (Fall, odd numbered years).

CHE 4010—Physical Chemistry I (4)

A study of three laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria. Prerequisites: MAT 1510-1520, PHY 2110-20, and CHE 1040-50. Lecture and lab. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as PHY 4010.

CHE 4020—Physical Chemistry II (4)

Explores selected recent advances in physical chemistry including quantum mechanics, atomic phenomena, nuclear structure, nuclear forces, nuclear energy, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: MAT 1510-1520, PHY 2110-20, and CHE 1040-50. Lecture and lab. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as PHY 4020.

CHE 4330—Special Projects in Chemistry (1-3)

Open to chemistry majors and minors with advanced standing. The course consists of individual study in a chosen field under the supervision of the faculty member in that area of chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 1040-50 plus the advanced course in the area of study. Non-majors may take course by special permission.

CHE 4335—Seminar in Chemistry (1)

Consists of projects and paper presented and reported to the science faculty and science majors.

CHE 4340—Research Projects in Chemistry (1-3)

Limited to chemistry majors and minors. Individual or small group research in a selected field. Emphasis is on basic research techniques. Research is under supervision of a faculty member in chemistry. Prerequisite: beginning courses in major/minor plus courses pertinent to area of research.

CHE 4510—Career Internship in Chemistry (1-3)

Work in an off-campus chemistry laboratory under faculty supervision. Recommended for students planning a career in chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 2530. Supervision coordinated with the Career Planning Office. Maximum of 6 hours. Graded S/U.

PHYSICS

PHY 1010—Basic College Physics I (4)

An introductory treatment of mechanics, vibration, wave motion, sound, and fluids. Emphasis will be placed on the conceptual aspects of these topics with many illustrative examples drawn from biology and medicine. This course does not require prior knowledge of calculus. Mathematics above high school algebra is not required. .Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

PHY 1020—Basic College Physics II (4)

A continuation of PHY 1010 emphasizing heat, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, geometrical and physical optics, topics in atomic, quantum and nuclear physics. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

PHY 2030—Digital Electronics (4)

A study of the elements of digital circuit logic and microprocessors. Includes minimization techniques, error detecting, data transfer, data conversion, and arithmetic methods. Lecture and lab. (Fall, even years.) Fee charged.

PHY 2040—Environmental Physics (3)

Energy, advantages and disadvantages of the various energy types now used, energy conversion processes and radiation, and their roles in technological development and the quality of the natural environment. Introduction to sources and methods of energy production, energy usage, energy conservation strategies and alternate energy utilization. Lecture and lab. (On demand.) Prerequisite: PHY 2110. Fee charged.

PHY 2100—Object-Oriented Design and Programming in Java I (3)

An IT core course designed to provide an in-depth, hands-on introduction to designing and developing software using the Java programming language. Design methodologies, object modeling with UML, structured programming, and data structures are also reviewed. Extensive lab time will help to develop skills needed when developing software in the business environment. Prerequisite: ITI 2000 or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ITI 2100.

PHY 2110-2120—General Physics I, II (4), (4)

For students with an interest in science, engineering, and medicine. Includes mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, 1520. Fee charged.

PHY 2130—Statics (3)

The elements of statics with application to systems of forces in two and three dimensions (particles and rigid bodies), resultants, equivalent systems, and equilibria. Vector notation is introduced. Friction. Corequisite: PHY 2120, MAT 1520. (Spring, even numbered years.)

PHY 2140—Intermediate Mechanics (4)

A study of the states of systems of particles and of rigid bodies using Newton's Laws and conservation principles. Covering topics such as kinematics and dynamics of system particles, rotation proportions of rigid bodies, and motion under a central force. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PHY 2110, PHY 2120, PHY 4020 and MAT 1510 and 1520. (Fall, even numbered years). Fee charged.

PHY 2150—Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism (4)

A study that covers electrostatics, electric fields, potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, currents, and introduction to Maxwell's equations. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PHY 2110, PHY 2120, PHY 4020 and MAT 1510 and 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years). Fee charged.

PHY 3130—Circuits (4)

Elements of AC/DC circuits with semiconductor devices as applied to computing and other systems. Lecture and lab. (Fall, odd numbered years.) Fee charged.

PHY 3500—Object-Oriented Programming in C++ (3)

A course designed to provide an in-depth, hands-on introduction to designing and developing software using the C++ programming language. Extensive lab time for programming will help to develop skills needed when developing software in the business and science environment. Some database programming is also included. Prerequisites: ITI 2100 and ITI 2700, or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ITI 3500.

PHY 4010—Thermodynamics (4)

A study of the first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PHY 2120, MAT 1520. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 4010.

PHY 4020—Modern Physics (4)

A course that explores some of the current concepts in physics. Topics include relativity, energy quanta, atomic phenomena, nuclear structure, nuclear forces, and nuclear energy. Prerequisites: PHY 2120, MAT 1520. Lecture and lab. (Spring, even number years.) Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 4020.

PHY 4330—Special Projects in Physics (1-3)

Open to science majors and minors with advanced standing. Individual study in a chosen field under the supervision of a faculty member in Physics. Non-majors may take course by special permission.

PHY 4335—Seminar in Physics (1)

Consists of projects and paper presented and reported to the science faculty and science majors.

PHY 4340—Research Projects in Physics (1-3)

Limited to physics majors and minors. Individual or small group research in a selected field. Emphasis is on basic research techniques. Research is under supervision of a faculty member in physics. Prerequisite: beginning courses in major/minor, plus courses pertinent to are of research.

PHY 4510—Career Internship in Physics (1-3)

Work in off-campus physics lab under faculty supervision. Recommended for students planning a career in science. Prerequisite PHY 2150. Supervision coordinated with Career Planning Office. Maximum 6 hrs. Graded S/U.

SCIENCE

SCI 1050—Science Philosophy and Practice (1)

An introduction to the methods used in the practice of science and the philosophies and standards that guide the scientific community as it seeks to advance the understanding of the natural world. Topics will include the process of science, scientific ethics, analysis and presentation of the results of scientific studies, reading and writing peer-reviewed scientific papers, and careers in science.

SCI 1500—Life Science (3)

A study of biological concepts including the chemistry of life, principles of inheritance, evolutionary theories, biological organization of various organisms, and relationships between organisms and their environment. Issues related to current advances in biotechnology and medicine are also considered. The process of scientific inquiry is emphasized and practiced in both the lecture and laboratory. Fee charged.

SCI 1600—Physical Science (3)

Designed to convey the nature of matter and methods of study in the physical sciences and to study physical science concepts; issues and values related to the well being of individuals, society and the environment are considered. Fee charged.

SCI 2000—Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

An introduction to Environmental Science and the scope of environmental problems facing the world. The course focuses on the rapidly increasing rate at which these problems are occurring and the changes they are setting in motion in the biosphere and the interconnectedness of humans in the world ecosystem. This course can be used for the General Education laboratory science curriculum requirement. Available by distance learning. Fee charged.

SCI 2150—Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences (3)

A hands-on introduction to computer-based measurements, automation, and graphical programming for the sciences. The LabVIEW graphical programming environment will be introduced and used to write software applications that collect, display and analyze experimental data. Automated experiments in the areas of Biology, Chemistry and Physics will be designed and implemented. Topics such as sensors, signals, data acquisition, error analysis, and noise will be explored. The use of standard office spreadsheet, word-processing, and presentation software for scientific data analysis and reporting will also be emphasized.

SCI 2200—Physical Geology (3)

Covers earth processes and their effects on the materials, structure, and morphology of the earth's crust. Laboratory includes field work, study of rocks, minerals, models, topographic and aerial photographs. Available by distance learning. Fee charged.

SCI 2510—Earth and Space Science (3)

Covers topics of geology, astronomy, meteorology, oceanography. Suitable for elementary or secondary education majors and for general education. Lab activities related to each major topic are included. Fee charged.

SCI 2600—Issues in Science (3)

An introduction to themes in the natural sciences that have significantly impacted our world. Among the themes discussed are: relativity, modern cosmology, evolutionary thought, biotechnology, advances in modern medicine, biodiversity, and the use of natural resources. Scientific discoveries will be approached with both a historical perspective and a consideration of current and future applications. Interactions of scientific thought and the Christian worldview are considered.

SCI 4330—Special Projects in Earth and Space Science (1-3)

Individual study in a chosen area of earth and space science under the supervision of the faculty member in this area. Selected activities are also included.

MATHEMATICS

MAT 1040—Concepts of Mathematics (3)

Considers the realm of mathematics as some of the greatest ideas of humankind—ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. This course will introduce students to several of these ideas, selected from topics in numerical patterns, infinity, geometry, topology, chaos, probability, and statistics. Study of these topics will not only demonstrate the beauty of mathematics but will also develop critical thinking skills. This course is designed for liberal arts majors to satisfy the general education requirement.

MAT 1044—Applied Mathematics for Business (3)

A brief overview of functions, with particular attention to linear and quadratic functions, emphasizing business applications such as supply and demand curves and optimization, followed by exponential and logarithmic functions; business applications such as compound interest, present value, annuities and amortization; probability and statistics. Prerequisite: Students who were required to take INT 0950 Elementary Algebra are required to pass INT 0960 Intermediate Algebra in addition to INT 0950.

MAT 1055—College Algebra (3)

A brief review of concepts of algebra followed by a study of equations and inequalities; polynomial and rational functions and their graphs; solutions to polynomial equations; exponential and logarithmic functions; and systems of equations. Prerequisite: Students who were required to take INT 0950 Elementary Algebra are required to pass INT 0960 Intermediate Algebra in addition to INT 0950.

MAT 1250—Discrete Mathematics (3)

A study of discrete structures geared toward those entering information technology fields. Topics include problem solving, numeration systems, sets, logic, relations, recursion, graphs and trees, sorting, and elementary data structures. (Fall, even numbered years).

MAT 1310—Precalculus (3)

A brief review of polynomial and rational functions and systems, and of exponential and logarithmic functions. Study of trigonometric functions, graphs, formulas and identities; inverse functions, including inverse trigonometric functions; solutions to systems of equations; and polar coordinate systems. Prerequisite MAT 1055 or the equivalent.

MAT 1350—Statistical Analysis for the Sciences (3)

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on exploratory and inferential techniques for analyzing and modeling data. Topics include descriptive statistics, regression, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and experiment design. Statistical software is implemented throughout the course. Prerequisite: MAT 1055 or equivalent.

MAT 1400—Perspectives in Mathematics (1)

An introduction to mathematical thought for students, especially freshmen, who are interested in a mathematics major or minor, or for any student interested in learning about some important ideas and uses of mathematics. Several contemporary mathematical topics will be studied, such as recently solved problems, orders of infinity, Fermat's last theorem, Tangles and knot theory, cryptography, the fourth dimension, the four-color theorem, topology, or fractals and chaos. Prerequisite: High school algebra and trigonometry. Calculus is NOT necessary. Graded S, U.

MAT 1510-1520—Calculus I and II (4), (4)

A study of Cartesian and polar coordinates, parametric equations, vectors and vector-valued functions in 2 and 3 dimensions, limits, differentiation of functions with applications, integration of functions with applications, Taylor polynomials, and series. It is strongly recommended that students take PHY 2110 and PHY 2120 concurrently with MAT 1510 and MAT 1520, respectively. Prerequisites for MAT 1510: MAT 1310 or equivalent; Prerequisite for MAT 1520: MAT 1510. (Fall and Spring, respectively, every year).

MAT 2150—Introduction to Mathematical Software and Programming (3)

An introduction to current mathematical software. Development of skills in several current programs, such as Derive, Sketch Pad, and Maple Mathematica, for solving symbolic and numerical mathematics problems will be emphasized. Students will learn to write programs using one or more of these systems and graphing calculators. Prerequisites: MAT 1510. (Spring, odd numbered years).

MAT 2510—Calculus III (4)

A study of partial derivatives and multiple integrals and additional topics in vector-valued functions. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Fall, every year).

MAT 2600—Introduction to Abstract Mathematics (3)

Study of basic ideas and methods of mathematics including sets, logic, proof techniques, relations, functions, mathematical induction, and modular arithmetic. Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 1520. (Spring, every year).

MAT 2800—Program Design and Data Structures (4)

The study of elementary data structures, their associated algorithms and their application in problems; rigorous development of programming techniques and style; design and implementation of programs with multiple modules, using good data structures and good programming style. Prerequisite: PHY 3500. (Offered as needed.)

MAT 3000—Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3)

Probability of sample spaces, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions. Analysis of the principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Fall, even numbered years).

MAT 3010—Discrete Methods (3)

Discrete mathematical ideas including graph theory, counting techniques, recurrence relations, and methods of solving applied problems. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Fall, odd numbered years).

MAT 3020—Differential Equations (3)

An introduction to ordinary differential equations, including linear and nonlinear equations with applications, power series solutions, and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years).

MAT 3050—Introduction to Operations Research (3)

Study of methods and ideas in operations research including linear programming using the simplex method and interior point methods, nonlinear programming, stochastic processes and Markov chains. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years).

MAT 3080—Foundations of Geometry (3)

Elementary geometry from an advanced standpoint; a study of axiomatic structures; Euclidean in two and three dimensions; Finite geometries, projective geometry and constructions. Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 2600. (Spring, even numbered years).

MAT 3090—Linear and Matrix Algebra (3)

Linear equations, vector operations, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values and singular vectors, canonical forms, polynomial functions of matrices, vector spaces, and related topics. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Spring, even numbered years).

MAT 4030—Introduction to Real Analysis (3)

Real number system, functions, sequences, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, infinite series and sequences. Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 2510 and MAT 2600. (Fall, odd numbered years).

MAT 4060—Modern Algebra (3)

Sets, groups, rings, and fields. Logical rigorous proofs and analysis are emphasized. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Fall, even numbered years).

MAT 4110—Topics in Mathematics (3)

In-depth coverage of one topic to be selected from pure or applied mathematics, with regard to interest of the instructor and students. Possible topics include combinatorics, number theory, differential geometry, topology, numerical analysis, coding theory, cryptology, or partial differential equations. Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit. Offered as needed.

MAT 4330—Directed Study in Math (1-3)

For advanced students working on special projects supervised by the instructor.

MAT 4335—Seminar in Mathematics (1)

Projects and paper presented to the mathematics faculty and other mathematics majors. To be taken by seniors. Offered as needed.

MAT 4510—Career Internship in Mathematics (1-3)

Mathematics service laboratory (on-the-job experience) under the supervision of faculty. Juniors and Seniors only. Supervision coordinated with Career Planning Office. Maximum 6 hrs. Graded S/U.