Department of Communication Studies

FACULTY

DAVID F. DEESE, Coordinator, Department of Communication Studies, Assistant Professor of Broadcasting and Communication, 1979—
BA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1969; MS, Tennessee State University, 1983.

GARY R. FARMER, Assistant Professor of Communication, 2002—
BA, Oral Roberts University, 1982; MA, Regent University, 1995.

JEFFREY D. FRAME, Associate Professor of Drama and Communication, 1990—
BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1985; MA, Emerson College, 1988.

J. DOUGLAS LEPTER, Professor of Communication, 1992—
BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1972; MA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1973; ThM, Asbury Theological Seminary, 1990;
PhD, University of Kentucky, 1996.

LENA HEGI WELCH, Chair, Division of Communication, Language, and Literature; Professor of Communication, 1988—
BA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1981; MA, Auburn University, 1983; EdD, Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005.

Department of Communication Studies General Information

The Department of Communication Studies offers broad training in the general area of human communication. The curriculum provides considerable flexibility and is designed to fit a variety of student needs and career interests. There are seven specialized majors which lead to the Bachelor's degree: 1) Dramatic Arts, 2) Theatre Education, 3) Interpersonal Communication, 4) Organizational Communication, 5) Mass Communication, 6) Broadcast Technology, and 7) Speech Communication Education. The Department also offers a Bachelor's degree in the general "Communication Studies" major consisting of courses selected from the specialized programs listed above. This Communication Studies major allows students to tailor their study to individual career goals.

In addition to classroom course offerings, practical experience can be achieved through internships and individualized instruction in the bachelor degree programs.

Mission Statement and Learning Objectives for Department Academic Majors

Communication Studies

Mission Statement

The Communication Studies major seeks to provide graduates with a general yet comprehensive academic foundation in the study of human communication. The major is a hybrid departmental curriculum which allows students to selectively choose the most suitable courses from across the department's program offerings to meet their individualized educational objectives.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Communication Studies major will be able to:

  1. Possess knowledge suitable for employment in a career requiring communication skills.
  2. Conduct a primary research project demonstrating either qualitative or quantitative research skills.
  3. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge necessary for admission into graduate school in communication.

Dramatic Arts

Mission Statement

The Dramatic Arts major seeks to prepare graduates with a broad understanding of theatre to succeed professionally in educational, community, and/or professional theatre venues and/or to succeed in graduate theatre programs.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Dramatic Arts major will be able to:

  1. Begin graduate studies or a career in or directly related to professional theatre.
  2. Critically assess a theatre production's relative merits and weaknesses within the global contexts of artistic expression and spiritual significance.
  3. Satisfy proficiently at least ONE of the basic collaborative roles for the production of a play that is at least one-act in length, or longer. The roles graduates may choose from are: director of the play, performer in a major character role of the play; author of the script; lighting designer of the play; scene designer of the play; or costume designer of the play.

Theatre Education

The Theatre Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

Interpersonal Communication

Mission Statement

The Interpersonal Communication major seeks to prepare graduates with skills such as listening, empathy, trust, and conflict management that are critical to effective leadership and service.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with an Interpersonal Communication major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate skills necessary for employment in a career requiring interpersonal communication skills.
  2. Give a proficient formal presentation.
  3. Identify a major theorist in the discipline of interpersonal communication.
  4. Possess knowledge necessary for admission into a graduate program in communication.
  5. Understand the role and nature of communication in interpersonal relationships.

Organizational Communication

Mission Statement

The Organizational Communication major seeks to prepare graduates who can study the role of messages, meanings, and information flow in and between organizations and are prepared for employment in corporations and non-profit organizations.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with an Organizational Communication major will be able to:

  1. Exhibit skills necessary for employment in a career requiring organizational communication skills.
  2. Identify a major theorist in the discipline of organizational communication.
  3. Demonstrate skills in oral, written, and relational communication, along with critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
  4. Possess knowledge required for admission into graduate study in communication.

Mass Communication

Mission Statement

The Mass Communication major seeks to prepare graduates who have broad-based understanding of mass communication that will prepare them to succeed in management and operations positions (such as camera operators, disc jockeys, editors, news reporter, sales account executives, traffic log management, and on-camera personalities) in radio, television, and film.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mass Communication major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a strong understanding of the written and spoken word.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the operational requirements of a radio or television broadcast station.
  3. Produce an acceptable radio program (for radio concentration graduates) or video (for television and film concentration graduates).
  4. Exhibit skills necessary for employment in the radio, television, or film industry.
  5. Possess knowledge required for admission into graduate study in mass communication.

Broadcast Technology

Mission Statement

The Broadcast Technology major seeks to prepare graduates with the theoretical and practical knowledge required for technical support of broadcast and telecommunications facilities.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Broadcast Technology major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate their ability to obtain employment in at least an entry level position in the capacity of radio or television engineering.
  2. Show knowledge of the basic functional system blocks for a broadcast facility.
  3. Effectively communicate with written reports.
  4. Demonstrate a knowledge of FCC rules and regulations.
  5. Determine equipment needs for broadcast facilities.

Speech Communication Education

The Speech Communication Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

BA or BS in Communication Studies

This program provides a broad–based study of human communication. The course of study is designed by the student with the advisor's consent. Students whose programs consist primarily of dramatic arts and public speaking courses will be awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree while those who concentrate in Interpersonal, Organizational, and Mass Communication will be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree.

General Education

53 hours

Major

34 hours

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

The remaining 21 hours are to be taken from courses offered by the department. At least 17 of the total 34 hours in the major must be upper–division (3000 and 4000 level) courses.

Minor (Student's Choice)

15–18 hours

General Electives

15–18 hours

Total

120 hours

Dramatic Arts BA

The Dramatic Arts program provides opportunity for study of and participation in educational, community, or professional theatre. Learning occurs not only in classroom settings but also through actual experiences in every phase of dramatic production. The program is designed to integrate personal Christian faith and belief with the goals and aim of drama.

General Education

53 hours

Major

35-36 hours

COM

1000

Production Participation (6 satisfactory semesters)

(0)

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2250

Performance Studies

(3)

COM

2950

Script Analysis

(1)

COM

3140

Acting: Theory and Practice

(3)

COM

3400

Theatre History and Dramatic Literature

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4030

Design and Production for the Stage

(3)

COM

4040

Play Directing

(3)

COM

422
A–F

Drama Practicum

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1-2)

 

 

Electives in Dramatic Arts

(3)

Co-Curricular Requirements for Dramatic Arts Majors and Minors

The TNU Department of Communication Studies supports and directs a required co-curricular program for all dramatic arts majors and minors to supplement classroom theory, to encourage students to receive practical training through participation, and to benefit the University and surrounding communities.

The TNU Dramatic Arts Program presents 3-4 major dramatic productions during the academic year. Students majoring and minoring in dramatic arts must participate in 20 hours of some aspect of each production for 6 semesters at TNU. The semesters during which participation occurs do not need to be consecutive. Participation is open to all members of the University and local community. Likewise, dramatic arts majors and minors must attend all senior project presentations each year.

Senior Project Requirements for Dramatic Arts Majors

All senior Dramatic Arts majors are required (either in the fall or spring semester by choice) to present a performance project which will be open to the general public. Projects must include a pre-production prospectus, a performance component (acting, directing, design, etc.). The project should relate to the student's specialized interest in the field, demonstrate his or her acquired skills, and be academically and vocationally beneficial as a culminative experience. (All dramatic arts majors and minors are required to attend the projects of seniors.) Seniors will receive one (1) or two (2) credits for the senior project. The number of credits received is contingent upon the number of hours given to the project [40+ hours for one (1) credit, 80+ hours for two (2) credits].

Minor (Student's Choice)

15–18 hours

General Electives

13-17 hours

Total

120 hours

Theatre Education BA (K-12 Licensure)

The Theatre Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

Interpersonal Communication BS

The Interpersonal Communication major exists to prepare students to be effective and empathetic in their personal and professional lives. The curriculum emphasizes the development of interpersonal communication skills, such as listening, empathy, trust, and conflict management that are critical to effective leadership and service.

General Education

53 hours

Major

34 hours

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2010

Interpersonal Communication

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2810

Small Group Communication

(3)

COM

3340

Language and Social Interaction

(3)

COM

3500

Nonverbal Communication

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4060

Social Influence

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

The remaining 3 hours may come from Communication Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Business or Political Science with advisor consent.

(3)

Minor (Student's Choice)

15–18 hours

General Electives

15–18 hours

Total

120 hours

Organizational Communication BS

The purpose of the Organizational Communication major is to study the role of messages, meanings, and information flow in and between organizations. Students majoring in Organizational Communication will consider both the theoretical and applied analyses of the role of communication in the functioning of complex organizations. The major encourages students to develop skills in oral, written, and relational communication, along with critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Through classwork and internship opportunities, students sharpen their communication skills and prepare for employment in corporations and non-profit organizations.

General Education

53 hours

Major

34 hours

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2750

Human Relations in Organizations

(3)

COM

3000

Principles of Public Relations

(3)

COM

3260

Organizational Communication

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4060

Social Influence

 

 

 

or

 

COM

4560

Leadership in Christian Organizations

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

POL

3000

International Relations

 

 

 

or

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology

 

 

 

or

 

ECO

3070

The Global Economy

(3)

Electives in Communication Studies or Business Administration with advisor's consent

(3)

Minor (Student's Choice)

15–18 hours

General Electives

15–18 hours

Total

120 hours

Mass Communication BS

A general orientation to mass media is provided through the Mass Communication program. The curriculum specifically emphasizes radio and television broadcasting and applied journalism in this area. The radio concentration is conducted in conjunction with the training offered in the operation of the university–owned, radio station WNAZ–FM 89.1 and the AM stereo radio station WENO. The television concentration is enhanced by training in the campus-owned television studio in Waggoner Library. A Film Studies Concentration is available through the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (contingent upon the student's acceptance into the LAFSC program).

General Education

53 hours

Major:

37 hours

Core Courses:

22 hours

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2100

Introduction to Mass Communication

(3)

COM

3800

Communication Law

(3)

COM

3850

Mass Communication Ethics

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

Three Areas of Concentration:

 

Television Concentration

15 hours

COM

3300

Television Studio Production

(3)

COM

3360

Advanced Television Production

(3)

COM

4140

Broadcast Journalism and TV News Reporting

(3)

COM

4450

Telecommunications Management

(3)

 

 

Electives in Mass Communication

(3)

Radio Concentration

15 hours

COM

2120

Station Practices

(3)

COM

2130

Radio and TV Announcing and Audio Production

(3)

COM

3600

Broadcast Advertising and Sales

(3)

COM

4010

Radio Station Management and Promotion

(3)

 

 

Electives in Mass Communication

(3)

Film Studies Concentration

15 hours

COM

3700

Film Theory and Criticism

(3)

COM

3750

Film History

(3)

Remainder of major coursework completed at LAFSC (contingent upon student's acceptance into the LAFSC program)

 

LAFSC courses (Nine hours will be applied to concentration, the remainder will be electives):

(9)

 

 

Core Courses:

 

 

 

Hollywood Production Workshop (3)

 

 

 

Theology in Hollywood (4)*

 

 

 

Internship: Inside Hollywood (6)*

 

 

 

Elective Courses (choose one):

 

 

 

Motion Picture Production (3)

 

 

 

Professional Screenwriting (3)

 

 

 

Independent Study (3)

 

Minor

15-18 hours

General Electives

12-15 hours

Total:

120 hours

* Will satisfy the core requirements of COM 3850, 4510, and 4800.

Broadcast Technology BS

This program provides the theoretical and practical knowledge required for technical support of broadcast and telecommunications facilities. The curriculum includes a physics component that primarily centers on both digital and analog electronics, plus radio frequency technology. A proficiency in mathematics is required and upper division math courses are included as part of the degree. The program is designed to prepare the student for certification by the broadcast industry and a career in broadcast technology management.

General Education

45 hours

General Education requirements in Natural Science, Math, and Computer Literacy are replaced by required courses for the major.

Major

48 hours

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2100

Introduction to Mass Communication

(3)

COM

2120

Station Practices

(3)

COM

3800

Communication Law

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4010

Radio Station Management and Promotion

(3)

COM

4120

Broadcast Engineering

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Communication Studies Seminar

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY

2150

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

(4)

PHY

3130

Circuits

(4)

Required Support Courses

16 hours

SCI

2100

Microcomputer Applications for Science and Mathematics

(3)

ITI

2000

IT Business Foundations

(3)

ITI

2600

Data Communication and Networking Essentials

(3)

MAT

1055

College Algebra

(3)

MAT

1310

Pre Calculus

 

 

 

or

 

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(3) or (4)

Minor

Not required—included in major

General Electives (It is suggested that computer programming courses would further complement the major.)

11 or 12 hours

Total

120 hours

Speech Education BS (7-12 Licensure)

The Speech Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

Communication Studies Minors

Communication Studies Minor

15 hours

COM

2000

Theories of Communication

(3)

 

 

Interpersonal Communication Elective

(3)

 

 

Mass Communication Elective

(3)

 

 

Dramatic Arts Elective

(3)

 

 

Organizational Communication Elective

(3)

Dramatic Arts Minor

16 hours

COM

2950

Script Analysis

(1)

Four (4) of the five (5) courses:

 

 

COM

2250

Performance Studies

(3)

 

COM

3140

Acting I: Theory and Practice

(3)

 

COM

3400

Theatre History and Dramatic Literature

(3)

 

COM

4030

Design and Production for the Stage

(3)

 

COM

4040

Play Directing

(3)

 

 

Drama Elective

(3)

Interpersonal Communication Minor

15 hours

COM

2010

Interpersonal Communication

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2810

Small Group Communication

(3)

 

 

Interpersonal Communication Electives

(6)

Organizational Communication Minor

15 hours

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2750

Human Relations in Organizations

(3)

COM

3260

Organizational Communication

(3)

Choose two of the following:

(6)

 

COM

3000

Principles of Public Relations

 

 

COM

4060

Social Influence

 

 

COM

4560

Leadership in Christian Organization

 

Mass Communication Minor

18 hours

COM

2100

Introduction to Mass Communications

(3)

COM

3800

Communication Law

(3)

 

 

Television Elective

(3)

 

 

Radio Elective

(3)

 

 

Film Elective

(3)

 

 

Mass Communication Elective

(3)

Communication Course Descriptions

DRAMATIC ARTS

COM 1000—Production Participation and Project Attendance (0)

Required of all dramatic arts majors and minors for six (6) semesters. To receive a passing grade, students are to participate in 20 hours of some aspect of production work for each of the productions planned during the six semesters that are chosen by the student. Graded S/U. Note: No credit is given and no tuition is charged.

COM 2250—Performance Studies (3)

Designed to invite students into a richer understanding of the performing arts, as well as other Western and non-Western performative experiences in physical human expression, both past and present. Special focus is given to major world events in the historical development of our performance traditions (particularly in theatre and dance), styles of textual representation in the performing arts--from classical to contemporary, and the dialectical relationship between performance and culture.

COM 2350—Creative Drama (3)

Course not concerned with play production, acting, or any of the theatrical entertainment aspects of drama. It focuses on drama used solely as a therapeutic and educational tool in the classroom. Participants will focus on creative leadership and teaching strategies that include the following: conflict resolution through drama, critical thinking and life skills development, historical re-enactment techniques in social studies, "teacher-in-role" role playing, imagination exploration, values through game–playing, creative drama for special needs, and drama–in–education techniques for creatively teaching all subjects.

COM 2450—Drama as a Ministry (3)

A course designed to expose students to the variety of dramatic experiences and expressions which may be incorporated into Christian ministry. Through the study of drama as an art form in relation to theology, worship, Christian education, and personal spiritual development, students are prepared and encouraged to become practitioners of drama ministry.

COM 2950—Script Analysis (1)

A detailed study of the basic tools and approaches necessary for reading and interpreting stage scripts before directing, acting, or design processes can effectively begin. (All dramatic arts majors and minors, as well as all drama education majors, must take this course in their freshman year, with the exception of transfer students).

COM 3140—Acting: Theory and Practice (3)

An introductory workshop course focusing on beginning acting techniques and scene study. Initially students will explore the actors' instrument and use of space, relaxation, concentration, imagination, improvisation, mime, movement, and how to pursue an objective through physical and psychological actions. The students will then investigate and practice traditional approaches to scene analysis, character study, and performance.

COM 3170—Voice and Articulation (3)

Study of and practical experience in refining the vocal mechanism for general quality speech production. Includes intensive work with International Phonetic Alphabet and dialectology.

COM 3400—Theatre History and Dramatic Literature (3)

A comprehensive survey of representative plays from each period of theatre history, noting the reciprocal effects of production techniques on dramatic forms. Special emphasis is given to cultural and historical factors influencing the rise and fall of new dramatic forms and theatrical practices. Prerequisite: COM 2250 or permission of instructor.

COM 3550—Shakespeare (3)

Cross listed as ENG 3550.

COM 3900—Scriptwriting (3)

An introductory workshop course focusing on the techniques, styles, and conventions of writing for the stage and screen. Students will develop skills and gain experience in composing scripts for stage and screen and will work on several projects throughout the course. Prerequisite: ENG 1080 or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ENG 3900.

COM 4030—Design and Production for the Stage (3)

A hands–on, introductory study of theatrical design and production that will primarily focus on scenic and lighting design and production. Costume design and production will be addressed briefly. In the process, students will practice design, construction, and implementation skills in conjunction with the current drama production as well as through individual project work. Prerequisite: COM 2250 or permission of instructor.

COM 4040—Play Directing (3)

An introductory examination of the directorial process beginning with textual analysis of dramatic action and covering such areas as production unity, stage movement and business, motivational analysis, and pictorial composition. Other areas of emphasis include a brief overview of directing history, types of directing theory and style, planning and rehearsal techniques, and the relationship of the director to other theatre artists. Student work includes selected scene work and directing projects prepared for class presentation culminating in a final scene presentation. Prerequisite: COM 2250 or permission of instructor.

COM 4050—Acting Studio: Special Problems in Acting (3)

An advanced acting course including advanced work on monologues and scenes from contemporary plays. Student work is designed to build upon a basic knowledge and experience in acting, concentrating on individual actor problems and on specific acting situations such as complex emotional scenes, dialects, exceptional characterizations, the development of period acting styles, etc. Prerequisite: COM 3140 or permission of instructor.

COM 422 (A–F)—Drama Practicum (1)

Provides supervised participation and instruction in various aspects of theatre. Open to all students with the consent of the instructor. Dramatic Arts majors are required to take this one-hour practicum in three of the following areas: (a) Acting, (b) Stage Management, (c) Scenery and Props, (d) Costumes and Make-up, (e) Lighting and Sound, (f) Directing. Graded S/U.

COM 4400—Modern Drama (3)

A historical study of the work of selected American, European, or Third World playwrights from the turn of the century to the present with emphasis on new production techniques as they influenced and shaped the modern theatre. An appropriate elective for literature students as well as drama majors. Prerequisite: COM 3400 or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ENG 3040.


INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

COM 2010—Interpersonal Communication (3)

A study of two–person (dyadic) communication. Topics include: human communication theory, verbal and nonverbal codes, development of self–concept, perception, impression formation, and relationship development. Prerequisite for all courses leading to an Interpersonal Communication major.

COM 2020—Principles of Intercultural Communication (2)

A study of how culture affects communication behavior and intercultural relationships. This course provides a broad theoretical and contextual base that emphasizes intercultural communication competency as it relates to Western and non-Western cultures.

COM 2030—Practicum in Intercultural Communication (1)

A field-based, experiential course structured to provide the student with skill development opportunities in intercultural community service or ministry. The course must be taken concurrent with or subsequent to COM 2020.

COM 2810—Small Group Communication (3)

Involves the study of theory and research of communication behavior in small problem–solving groups. Includes the effects of participants' personal characteristics and of situational constraints involved in small group interaction.

COM 3340—Language and Social Interaction (3)

An examination of communication as symbolic interaction between human beings within social contexts. The social construction of interpersonal and societal meaning primarily through the use and influence of language is analyzed.

COM 3350—U.S. Cultural and Ethnic Diversity (3)

Cross listed as SOC 3350.

COM 3500—Nonverbal Communication (3)

A study of the nonverbal forms of human communication. Special attention is given to the creation of meaning through such nonverbal forms as facial expression, gesture, bodily movement, use of space and time, voice, and environmental setting.

COM 3710—Practicum in Intercultural and Community Development Skills (3)

A field-based, experiential course designed to introduce the student to developmental skills for cross-cultural community service or ministry. Students are also introduced to skills needed for initiating and maintaining sustainable communities. This course is offered through the HEART Institute (Lake Wales, FL). Students must be pre-approved before enrolling. Cross listed as SOC/PRA 3710.

COM 4060—Social Influence (3)

Examines the role of communication and human relations in the initiation of attitude change and development within individuals, groups, community organizations, and other cultures. Consideration will be given to persuasive theory, diffusion of innovations, conflict resolution, and the development of working relationships between and within community groups.


ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

COM 2750—Human Relations in Organizations (3)

Examines concepts and literature useful in analyzing interpersonal behavior in an organizational setting. Includes reading, simulations, case studies, and field observation of situations involving problems of morale, productivity, leadership, authority, communication and the introduction of change.

COM 3000—Principles of Public Relations (3)

Surveys the development, scope, and role of public relations in society and provides training in basic public relations skills. Includes practical experience with news releases, PR campaigns, communication schedules, and media strategies.

COM 3040—Human Resources Management (3)

Cross listed as BUS 3040.

COM 3150—Sales Fundamentals (3)

Cross listed as MKT 3150.

COM 3200—Sales Management (3)

Cross listed as MKT 3200.

COM 3220—Advertising Management (3)

Cross listed as MKT 3220.

COM 3260—Organizational Communication (3)

Examines organizations and organizational communication within broader social, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Strategies of organizing and communicating are analyzed from the perspective that organizations are embedded in a society's beliefs, values, structures, practices, and tensions.

COM 4560—Leadership in the Christian Organization (3)

A course designed to enable students to integrate leadership theory and Biblical principles into a workable philosophy of leadership. Because secular leadership theory is not always applicable in Christian organizations, careful attention is given to worldview, motivation, leadership style, team building, power, decision making, organizational culture, and conflict resolution. Cross listed as CED 4560.


MASS COMMUNICATION

COM 2080—Video Production Practicum (1)

Provides students with hands-on experience in video production (camerawork, set design, control room procedures, editing), typically in conjunction with various campus projects. Prerequisite: COM 3300 Television Studio Production or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. (Television elective).

COM 2100—Introduction to Mass Communication (3)

Surveys the chronological developments in mass communication technologies. The study begins at the invention of movable type for the printing press and concludes with the most recent advances in electronic communication. The study will focus on the people and the machines having a part in the evolution of modern mass communications.

COM 2120—Station Practices (3)

A lecture and laboratory course that introduces the student to all aspects of broadcast radio station practices. Actual experience is gained at T-FM, the laboratory training station broadcasting to the Trevecca campus. (Radio elective)

COM 2130—Radio and TV Announcing and Audio Production (3)

A lecture and laboratory course designed to familiarize students with a variety of general broadcast speaking situations and techniques, as well as a study of the equipment, principles, and techniques of program production. (Radio, television elective). Cross listed as ITI 2130.

COM 2140—Station Management Practicum (1)

Provides preparation for student desiring radio station management experience, typically in conjunction with the campus student training station. The positions may include station manager, program director, music director, promotions director, news director, and sports director. Graded S/U. Requires permission of instructor. Prerequisite: COM 2120 Station Practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. (Radio elective)

COM 2150—Station Staff Practicum (1)

Offers preparation for students desiring hands-on experience as station personnel (air personalities, board operator, sports production, news production), typically in conjunction with the campus student training station. Graded S/U. Requires permission of instructor. Prerequisite: COM 2120 Station Practices. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. (Radio elective)

COM 2990—Principles of Digital Photography (2)

An introduction to digital cameras and digital photo editing. Each student must provide his/her own digital camera for use in the class.

COM 3300—Television Studio Production (3)

A lecture and laboratory course designed to familiarize students with the operation of television production studies including cameras, lighting, and set design along with an introduction to control room procedures. (Television elective). Cross listed as ITI 4180.

COM 3360—Advanced Television Production (3)

A lecture and laboratory course that examines producing, directing, and control room operation of video switchers, edit controllers, and video tape recorders. Prerequisite: COM 3300 or permission of the instructor. (Television elective)

COM 3370—Digital Video Editing (3)

An overview of non-linear video editing, including the acquisition of digital video and the combination and editing of source material to create complete short digital video projects. Focus includes basic editing techniques, working with a timeline, capturing video, cuts and transitions, adding and altering audio, titling, keying, applying filters and effects, and exporting video. Prerequisite: COM 3300 or permission of instructor.

COM 3600—Broadcast Advertising and Sales (3)

An in–depth study into sales and advertising for the broadcast media. It includes locating prospects, developing techniques and promotions, and using rate cards. Students will have contact with local broadcast sales professionals as part of the course. Prerequisite: COM 2100 or COM 2120 or permission of instructor. (Radio elective)

COM 3700—Film Theory and Criticism (3)

A survey of the major theoretical approaches to film—including montage, mise-en-scene, and structuralist theory—punctuated with an emphasis on the responsible, competent, critical evaluation/judgment of actual films. Some attention is also given to generic influences, filmic literacy, and artistic accountability. (Film elective). Cross listed as ENG 3060.

COM 3750—Film History (3)

An overview of motion picture art from the beginning to the present, focusing on such topics as early cinema and silent film, German expressionism, the arrival of sound, the studio system, genre, film noir, neo-realism, and postmodernism. Prerequisite: COM 2100 or the permission of instructor. (Film elective)

COM 3800—Communication Law (3)

Covers the American judicial system, First Amendment rights, communication acts, Federal Communication rules and regulations, and copyright laws. It is designed to give the student interested in mass communication an overview of the laws governing mass communications. Prerequisite: COM 2100 or COM 2120 or permission of instructor.

COM 3850—Mass Communication Ethics (3)

A study of the media's diverse and potent influence upon a "mass communication intensive" society and of the various public roles/responsibilities associated with important media issues concerning the news, advertising, public relations, invasion of privacy, censorship, financial improprieties, and especially the entertainment industry at large. The keystone of the course is the pursuit of media literacy within the context of moral reasoning.

COM 4010—Radio Station Management and Promotion (3)

Designed to acquaint students with the practical management of the broadcast station. Topics will include: applying for station permits, planning facilities, selecting equipment, training and supervising staff members, determining community needs, and meeting operating costs. Prerequisite: COM 2100 or COM 2120 or permission of instructor. (Radio elective)

COM 4120—Broadcast Engineering (3)

Designed to introduce the student to the duties, functions, and responsibilities of broadcast engineers. The study will include equipment selection, maintenance, replacement schedules, budgeting, and engineer qualifications. Prerequisite: COM 2100 or COM 2120 or permission of instructor. (Radio elective)

COM 4140—Broadcast Journalism and TV News Reporting (3)

Provides instruction in the area of news collection, writing, and reporting for broadcast media. Individuals successfully completing this class should have an adequate working knowledge for an entry level position in the broadcast journalism area. (Radio, television elective)

COM 4190—Organizational and Corporate Video Production (3)

A study of the roles and points of view of the writer, producer, director and client and the dynamic relationship these participants share in the field of organizational and corporate video production. Students will produce videos for a variety of "clients" throughout the semester. Students will be working individually as well as in production groups (teams). Students will alternate roles (i.e., producer, director, PA, etc.) with each new group project. In addition to projects, assignments and specified readings, students will be required to participate in group activities both on and off campus occasionally on their own time. Prerequisite: COM 3300 or permission of instructor. (Television elective). Cross listed as ITI 4190.

COM 4450—Telecommunications Management (3)

Explores management theories and practices as they apply to television, cable outlets and other electronic media facilities. Course topics include station programming and formats, scheduling, marketing and research, sales, promotions, ratings, consultants, management styles, employment evaluations and syndication. (Television elective).


DEPARTMENTAL OFFERINGS

COM 1010—Speech Communication (3)

A study of the principles and practices of effective human communication, with emphasis placed on public speaking. The course emphasizes the critical thinking and skill development necessary for effective speech. Listening skills are included in the study.

COM 2000—Theories of Communication (3)

Surveys the major theories of human communication. The study will focus on the origins, usefulness, and limitations of each theory for understanding communication events. This course will help prepare students to analyze and interpret human communication in all its forms (intrapersonal communication, interpersonal communication, small group transactions, organizational communication, public speaking, drama, and mass communication). Prerequisite for all communication courses above COM 1010.

COM 2060–70—Sign Language I , II (3), (3)

Teaches the basic hand signs needed for working with deaf and hard of hearing in church and school settings. Interpreting signing is also taught.

COM 2230—Oral Interpretation (3)

A study in the techniques of interpretation for oral reading applied to various types of literature. Emphasis is given to selection of material, analysis of content, characteristics of verbal delivery, and methods of nonverbal interpretation. Students will work with prose, poetry, and dramatic forms of literature. Oral reading of scripture is also emphasized. Prerequisite: COM 1010 or permission of instructor.

COM 2500—Argumentation and Debate (3)

A study of the nature of reasoned discourse. Attention is given to the process of analyzing an issue, structuring arguments, using evidence, and handling refutation and rebuttal in oral communication. Actual classroom debate will enable speakers to practice the principles being studied. Prerequisite: COM 1010 or permission of instructor.

COM 3070—The Rhetorical Tradition (3)

Provides an introduction to the study of rhetoric and historic public address. The course focuses on the manner in which people have used discourse to influence the behavior of others and includes a broad survey of rhetorical theorists from Corax to contemporary scholars.

COM 4000—Advanced Public Speaking (3)

Gives students practical experience in the preparation and presentation of the speeches that are usually required in business and the professions. Areas of instruction include speech making, oral reading of reports, and speech for radio and television. Prerequisite: COM 1010 or permission of instructor.

COM 4210—Forensics Practicum (1)

Individualized instruction for students who participate in intercollegiate speech competition. Training is provided in both speech making and oral interpretation. Students are required to compete in selected speech tournaments. Graded S/U.

COM 433R—Readings in Communication (1–3)

Readings directed toward Interpersonal Communication, Organizational Communication, Radio–TV or Film, Dramatic Arts, Broadcast Technology, or other areas of communication.

COM 4330—Directed Study in Communication (1–3)

Individual guided study and research on special problems related to Interpersonal Communication, Organizational Communication, Dramatic Arts, Broadcast Technology, or other areas within the discipline of communication. Projects must be approved by the instructor before enrollment.

COM 4510—Career Internship in Communication Studies (1–3)

Intensive study, observation, and participation in various field projects designed and contracted between the student and instructor. Internships will be arranged in conjunction with the student's major. Supervision is coordinated with the Career Planning Office. Maximum of 6 hours. Graded S/U.

COM 453 (A–D)—Special Topics in Communication Studies (3)

A course designed for upper division students who are investigating the interrelationship of various aspects of communication in the following areas: (a) interpersonal communication, (b) mass communication/broadcasting, (c) dramatic arts, (d) organizational communication.

COM 4550—Research Methods in Communication Studies (3)

A course required of all majors to be taken during the senior year. It will allow students to integrate and apply the knowledge, skills, and appreciation acquired during their course of study. Students will work on a major communication research project that will draw on their course background. The goal of the project will be to demonstrate that the student has met the objectives for that particular major. The work will be analyzed and evaluated in class so that the breadth of the field of human communication can be understood.

COM 4800—Senior Project in Communication Studies (1-2)

All majors in the Department of Communication Studies are required to present a senior project as a public performance. The project should relate to the student's specialized interest in the field, demonstrate his or her acquired skills, and be academically and vocationally beneficial as a culminative experience. The project must be approved by the faculty advisor at least one semester in advance. The number of credits is contingent upon the number of hours given to the project [40+ hours for one (1) credit; 80+ for two (2) credits.]