Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

FACULTY

BRETT G. ARMSTRONG, Associate Professor of History and Political Science, 2001—
BS, Presbyterian College, 1986; MA, Georgia State University, 1993; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2002.

RANDY L. CARDEN, Professor of Psychology, 1981—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1978; MA, Middle Tennessee State University, 1979; EdD, Tennessee State University, 1990.

DON E. KINTNER, Professor of Psychology, 1989—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1975; MS, Tennessee State University, 1985; EdD, Tennessee State University, 1998.

RONALD W. MAURER, Professor of Social Work, 1995—BA, Anderson University, 1971; MSSW, University of Tennessee School of Social Work, 1973; MA, Anderson University School of Theology, 1986; PhD, Tennessee State University, 2004.

LARRY PALMER, Associate Professor of Psychology, 2006—
AA. Freed-Hardeman College, 1968; BA. Western Kentucky University, 1978; MA, Western Kentucky University, 1981; Ph.D., Tennessee State University, 2000

F. LEROY PEPPER, Associate Professor of History and Political Science, 2000—
BA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1970; MDiv, Nazarene Theological Seminary, 1973; MA, Florida State University, 1986; PhD, Florida State University, 1993.

TERRY T. PRUITT, Professor of Graduate Psychology, 1990—
BA, David Lipscomb University, 1968; MA, Middle Tennessee State University, 1974; EdD, Vanderbilt University, 1984.

STEPHEN M. PUSEY, Professor of History and Education, 1992—
BA, Olivet Nazarene University, 1975; MA, Northern Arizona University, 1976; PhD, The Ohio State University, 1981.

L. JOY WELLS, Associate Professor of Sociology and Social Work, 1977—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1976; MA, Middle Tennessee State University, 1977; MSSW, University of Tennessee, 1985.

LAURIE E. WOODS, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice, 2008—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1996; MS, Middle Tennessee State University, 1999; MLAS, Vanderbilt University, 2000; MA, Vanderbilt University, 2002, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2008.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences General Information

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers majors in the following areas: History; History and Political Science; Behavioral Science; Social Work; Criminal Justice Studies; Sociology; and Psychology. Several minors are also available: Art Therapy, History, Political Science, Social Science, Behavioral Science, Sociology, Psychology, Social Work, Criminology, and Family Studies.

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences have always been important areas of study at Trevecca Nazarene University. Historians and social scientists alike believe that the perceptions of people different from ourselves in time, space, and life-expressions are built upon our understanding of our own social and political experience. The department's goal, therefore, is to promote understanding of modern societies through the methods of the historian, the social scientist, and the behavioral scientist. Students desiring to enter the professional fields of teaching, historic preservation, museum-related work, law enforcement, social work, criminal justice, personnel management, behavioral research, and all levels of government service select history, history/political science, social work, criminal justice studies, sociology, psychology or behavioral science as major fields. In addition, minors in art therapy, history, political science, psychology, behavioral science, social science, social work, sociology, criminal justice, and family studies may be selected to back up work in any area of study.

The program in History and Political Science offers Pre-Law advising, which is usually (but not necessarily) organized around a history major or a history/political science major and may include minors or substantial course work in communications, English and business. Thus each student is guided through a course of study tailored to meet his or her particular needs and which will maximize his or her chances of success in graduate studies. Following the counsel of graduate schools of law and practicing attorneys, the department has established a personal program for each student who plans to pursue graduate legal studies.

The BS in Psychology is designed to assist all students in acquiring an interpretation of human behavior which is in harmony with a Christian view of people and is substantiated by the empirical information of a solidly scientific psychology. The psychology major will give students a solid base of preparation for graduate study or for the post-baccalaureate work world.

The BSSW in Social Work prepares students for beginning generalist social work practice from a Christian perspective. Students wishing to work in a helping profession should consider this degree. The curriculum emphasizes the foundations of beginning generalist social work practice by including content on human behavior, social welfare policy, at-risk populations, social work research, social work practice with individuals, groups, families, large organizations and communities, field practicum skills, social work values and ethics, cultural diversity and, social and economic justice.

Within the curriculum are incorporated both classroom learning and supervised field practicums. It is required that a student complete two separate field practicums. A broad spectrum of private and public settings are utilized for field practicums, including child welfare agencies, nursing homes, hospices, hospitals, substance abuse programs, mental health services, family service agencies, services to older people, residential treatment programs, adult day care centers, domestic violence programs, shelters, criminal justice agencies, public schools, and public social services.

The BS in Criminal Justice Studies is designed for those who have an interest in understanding the theories associated with the causes of crime, the work performed by criminal justice professionals, and the impact public policy decisions have on the operation of the criminal justice system. The relationship of race, ethnicity, poverty and other factors relative to criminal behavior, criminal prosecution and crime victimization are explored. Coursework and practicum experience prepare students for a variety of careers in the law enforcement community, emphasizing the importance of ethical leadership with a Christian worldview.

The program in Sociology provides students with insights into social factors that influence individuals, families, organizations, communities and society at large. Emphasis is placed on the impact of race, ethnicity, gender, age, and socioeconomic status as they pertain to the interaction among members of society and social change. Study in sociology encourages an appreciation of diversity and an understanding of how humans interact with each other, with their own cultures, with the environment, and with the global society.

The BS in Behavioral Science is offered to allow students who wish a broad background in Sociology, Psychology, and/or Anthropology to obtain such study which is applicable to a variety of career fields as well as graduate work in the behavioral sciences. Students interested in behavioral science research, personnel management, social services, and secondary level teaching might choose a behavioral science major.

Social and Behavioral Science students who are interested in working in rural areas of third world countries or in rural areas of the United States have the opportunity to attend the HEART Institute located in Lake Wales, FL. HEART is a village community that simulates many aspects of Third World living. Students reside in the village and are provided the opportunity for hands-on application of many valuable skills integrated into HEART's curriculum. In addition to practical and technical skills, participants acquire problem solving and coping skills that will enable them to adapt more readily to the challenges they will face overseas or rural areas of the United States. Students can attend for a full semester or for a two week summer program. Matching scholarships are available through HEART.

Mission Statements and Learning Outcomes for Academic Majors in Social and Behavioral Sciences

History Major

Mission Statement

The mission of the Program in History is to equip students to be competent in the field of History, responsible and compassionate leaders, and oriented toward service.

Learning Outcomes

Students majoring in History will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the past.
  2. Demonstrate an ability to apply historical perspective to contemporary issues and events.
  3. Understand the background and development of the United States as it has attained its present position of world power and influence.
  4. Apply Christian values to the study and interpretation of the past, always looking for more effective ways to integrate their faith and learning.
  5. Prepare for employment or graduate study in history or related fields.

History/Political Science Major

Mission Statement

The mission of the Program in History and Political Science is to equip students to be competent in the fields of History and Political Science, responsible and compassionate leaders, and oriented toward service.

Learning Outcomes

Students majoring in History/Political Science will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the past and of political processes.
  2. Demonstrate an ability to apply historical perspective and political understanding to contemporary issues and events.
  3. Understand questions of morals, ethics, justice, and democratic thought as they arise within political systems, and be able to apply Christian principles to those questions.
  4. Prepare for employment or graduate study in areas related to history and/or political science.

For the Teacher Licensure Programs in History with Concentration in Government or Economics:

Majors preparing for teacher licensure in the Social Studies declare as History Education majors. They are advised jointly by an Education advisor and a History advisor. It is strongly recommended that they add concentrations in Economics and/or Government/Political Science. The learning outcomes for those discipline areas apply in those fields. The teaching majors are approved by the Tennessee Board of Education and are part of the unit accredited by NCATE.

Psychology Major

Mission Statement

We intend for our graduates to be persons who are holistically developed and are of strong Christian character. We expect that they will be competent in their subject field and be responsible and compassionate leaders who have an orientation toward service.

Learning Outcomes

Students majoring in Psychology will be:

  1. Competent in the knowledge base of the discipline of psychology.
  2. Capable of conducting original research according to APA guidelines.
  3. Prepared for graduate study in psychology.
  4. Able to demonstrate a practical educational foundation in psychological skills and methods useful in the broad spectrum of psychologically-related fields.
  5. Prepared to apply themselves in professions other than psychology with skills in understanding human behavior.
  6. Able to understand psychological concepts, theories, and phenomena from a Christian perspective.
  7. Able to demonstrate critical thinking skills.

Social Work Major

Mission Statement

The mission of the social work major at Trevecca is to provide social work education for leadership and service. The program is based on Christian values that promote scholarship, critical thinking, and meaningful worship for students in preparation for lives of leadership and service to the church, the community, and the world at large. It intends that its graduates be persons who are developing holistically in the cognitive, emotional, physical, social, and spiritual areas of being. Their characteristics should include competence, responsibility, compassion, and the ability to integrate Christian faith and learning in social work practice.

Learning Outcomes

Social work majors will:

  1. Be competent in the knowledge base of the discipline of social work. (Policy and services, Social Work practice, Human behavior in the social environment, and research methods.)
  2. Demonstrate competency in skills for beginning social work practice. (as described in the Senior Field Practicum Student Evaluation)
  3. Be prepared for beginning level social work practice or graduate studies in social work.
  4. Demonstrate commitment to the basic values and ethics that shape social work practice from a Christian perspective.
  5. Recognize and appreciate cultural and social diversity including patterns and consequences of discrimination and oppression.

Sociology Major

Mission Statement

A major in sociology at Trevecca Nazarene University is designed to prepare students for careers in many different social science-related fields. A Christian perspective with emphasis on service to the community will assist students as they narrow their focus for future pursuits. A person with a degree in sociology can expect to enter many different careers, all with a worldview that encourages meaningful Christian interaction with members of society.

Learning Outcomes

Students majoring in Sociology will:

  1. Be competent in their understanding of sociological theory and how those theories pertain to today's society.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to conduct sound sociological research.
  3. Be able to integrate Christian faith into a chosen field of endeavor.
  4. Be adequately prepared for further studies in graduate school, law school, or other advanced academics.
  5. Demonstrate Christian love and compassion toward other human beings, as well as an understanding of human differences.

Criminal Justice Studies Major

Mission Statement

The Criminal Justice Studies major at Trevecca Nazarene University seeks to develop competent and caring criminal justice professionals who exhibit the qualities of leadership and service from a Christian perspective in their chosen areas of community service.

Learning Outcomes

Students majoring in Criminal Justice Studies will:

  1. Be competent in the knowledge base of the various content areas within criminology, including law enforcement, corrections, and the criminal justice system.
  2. Gain an understanding of legal and justice issues and the application of Christian principles to those questions and issues.
  3. Demonstrate a comprehension of the connection between the field of criminal justice and contemporary social issues.
  4. Be adequately prepared for entry-level employment in criminology, criminal justice, or a related field.
  5. Be adequately prepared for graduate study in criminology, criminal justice, or a related field.
  6. Demonstrate Christian compassion toward individuals from all backgrounds and walks of life, regardless of their social circumstances.

Behavioral Science Major

Mission Statement

The behavioral science major at Trevecca Nazarene University seeks to assist students in developing a Christian worldview, a compassionate spirit, and holistic perspective that will prepare them for meaningful service in the behavioral sciences or related field.

Learning Outcomes

Students majoring in Behavioral Science will:

  1. Be competent in the knowledge base of the discipline of behavioral science.
  2. Be adequately prepared for entry-level employment or graduate study in the behavioral sciences or related field.
  3. Be able to integrate knowledge of the psychological and social processes that bear upon human behavior.
  4. Be able to adequately articulate the integration of their Christian faith with their intended area of professional practice.
  5. Demonstrate Christian compassion and develop socially responsible attitudes toward individuals in a variety of social settings.
  6. Gain an understanding of research methodology in the behavioral sciences.

History BA

General Education

51 hours

HIS 1400 or HIS 1450, whichever is not taken in Context Tier, must be taken as Institutional Choice in Human Sciences Tier.

Major

34 hours

Core Requirements

10 hours

HIS

2010

United States History Survey I

(3)

HIS

2020

United States History Survey II

(3)

HIS

4200

Historical Research

(3)

HIS

4700

Senior Seminar

(1)

History Electives

24 hours

4 electives in United States History numbered above 3000

(9-12)

4 or 5 electives in Non-United States History numbered above 2000

(12-15)

Minor

18 hours

General Electives

17 hours

Total

120 hours

History Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

HIS

1400

World Civilization I*

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 2

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II*

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts of Math

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Behavioral choice

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

HIS

2010

U.S. Survey I*

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

 

Elective

(2)

 

Total 16-17

Semester 4

 

HIS

2020

U.S. Survey II*

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

U.S. or Non-U.S. elective**

(3)

 

 

Non-U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Lab. Science Choice

(3-4)

Total 16-17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Non-U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

HIS

4200

Historical Research*

(3)

POL

2020

American Political Institutions (recommended)

(3)

 

 

U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Non-U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

HIS

4700

Senior Seminar*

(1)

 

 

U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Non-U.S. Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 8

 

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(1-3)

 

Total 13-15

Total credit hours

120-122

*Required General Education for History majors or Core courses for History majors.

**Final total must include 9 hours US above 3000 and 12 hours Non-US above 2000.

History and Political Science BA

General Education

51 hours

HIS 1400 or HIS 1450, whichever is not taken in Context Tier, must be taken as Institutional Choice in Human Sciences Tier.

Major

34 hours

Core Requirements

16 hours

HIS

2010

United States History Survey I

(3)

HIS

2020

United States History Survey II

(3)

HIS

4200

Historical Research

(3)

HIS

4700

Senior Seminar

(1)

POL

2000

Introduction to Political Science

(3)

POL

2020

American Political Institutions

(3)

Electives

18 hours

1 elective in United States History numbered above 3000

(3)

2 electives in Non-United States History numbered above 2000

(6)

3 electives in Political Science numbered above 3000

(9)

Minor

18 hours

General Electives

17 hours

Total

120 hours

History and Political Science Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

HIS

1400

World Civilization I*

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

POL

2000

Introduction to Political Science*

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 2

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II*

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts Math

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

POL

2020

American Political Institutions*

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

HIS

2010

U.S. Survey I*

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2or3)

 

 

Elective

(2)

 

Total 16-17

Semester 4

 

HIS

2020

U.S. Survey II*

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Lab. Science choice

(3or4)

 

 

Behavioral choice

(3)

Total 16-17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Political Science elective

(3)

 

 

Political Science elective

(3)

 

 

Non-U.S. elective

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

HIS

4200

Historical Research*

(3)

 

 

Political Science elective

(3)

 

 

Non-U.S. elective

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

HIS

4700

Senior Seminar*

(1)

 

 

U.S. elective

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(2-3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 8

 

 

 

Minor course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours

120-122

*Required General Education History or History/Political Science Core courses.

Behavioral Science BS

General Education*

48 hours

Major

32 hours

Core Requirements

20 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

PSY

3000

Introduction to Behavioral Science Research and Design

(3)

PSY

3120

Social Psychology

(3)

SOC

3200

Social Problems

(3)

PSY

4350

Senior Seminar in Psychology

(2)

 

 

or

 

SOC

4350

Senior Seminar in Behavioral Science

 

Electives from Sociology, Psychology or Anthropology (with advisor approval)

12 hours

Minor (student's choice)

18-21 hours

General Electives

19-22 hours

Total

120 hours

*PSY 2010 or SOC 2010 count as behavioral choice.

Behavioral Science Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts of Math

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Tier elective #1

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 2

 

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communications

(3)

SCI

1500

Life Science

(3)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1600

Physical Science

 

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Tier Elective #2

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

PSY

3000

Behavioral Science Research and Design

(3)

 

 

Major Elective #1

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

SOC

3200

Social Problems

(3)

 

 

Major Elective #2

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literary requirement

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(2)

 

Total 14

Semester 6

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Major Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

 

 

Major Elective #4

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Minor Course or Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Practicum (Optional)

(1)

 

Total 16

Semester 8

 

SOC

4350

Senior Seminar in Behavioral Science

(2)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 14

Total credit hours

120

Criminal Justice Studies BS

General Education*

48 hours

Major

42 hours

Core Requirements

36 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

SOC

2800

Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice Systems

(3)

SOC

3360

Theories of Deviancy

(3)

SOC

3370

Juvenile Delinquency

(3)

SOC

3410

Corrections

(3)

SOC

3420

Policing in Society

(3)

SOC

3350

US Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

(3)

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

SOC

3110

Criminal Law and Procedure

(3)

SOC

3000

Research Design and Methods

(3)

SOC

3100

Criminal Investigation

(3)

SOC

4400

Practicum/Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice

(3)

Electives in Criminal Justice

6 hours

Minor

18 hours

General Electives

12 hours

Total

120 hours

*SOC 2010 counts as behavioral choice.

Criminal Justice Studies Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts of Mathematics

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

COM

1010

Speech Communications

(3)

SCI

1500

Life Science

(3)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1600

Physical Science

 

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

SOC

2800

Introduction to Criminology/Criminal Justice Systems

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

 

Total 14

Semester 4

 

SOC

3370

Juvenile Delinquency

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

SOC

3420

Policing in Society

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

SOC

3000

Research Design and Methods

(3)

SOC

3360

Theories of Deviancy

(3)

SOC

3410

Corrections

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

SOC

3110

Criminal Law and Procedure

(3)

SOC

3350

US Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

SOC

3100

Criminal Investigations

(3)

SOC

4400

Practicum in Criminal Justice

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours

120

Sociology BA

General Education*

48 hours

Major

34 hours

Core Requirements

25 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

SOC

3200

Social Problems

(3)

SOC

3350

US Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

(3)

PSY

3120

Social Psychology

(3)

SOC

3300

Urban Sociology

(3)

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

SOC

3800

Social Theory

(3)

SOC

3000

Research Methods and Design

(3)

SOC

4360

Senior Seminar in Sociology

(1)

Electives in Sociology

9 hours

Minor

18 hours

General Electives

20 hours

Total

120hours

* SOC 2010 counts as behavioral choice.

Sociology Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts of Math

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

SCI

1500

Life Science

(3)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1600

Physical Science

 

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

PSY

2060

Statistics

(3)

SOC

3200

Social Problems

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

 

Total 14

Semester 4

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

SOC

3800

Social Theory

(3)

SOC

 

Elective in Criminal Justice or Social Work

(3)

 

 

Elective in Sociology

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

SOC

3000

Research Design and Methods

(3)

SOC

3300

Urban Sociology

(3)

 

 

Elective in Sociology

(3)

 

 

Elective in Criminal Justice or Social Work

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

SOC

3350

US Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

SOC

 

Elective in Criminal Justice or Social Work

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

SOC

4360

Senior Seminar in Sociology

(1)

 

 

Elective in Sociology

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Elective

(2)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours

120

*Recommended elective

Psychology BS

General Education

(excluding PSY 2010)

48-50 hours

Major

33 hours

Core Requirements

30 hours

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

PSY

3000

Introduction to Behavioral Science Research and Design

(3)

PSY

3200

Practicum in Psychology

(1)

PSY

3210

Learning and Cognition

(3)

PSY

4110

Theories of Personality

(3)

PSY

4150

Abnormal Psychology

(3)

PSY

4320

Physiological Psychology

(3)

PSY

4350

Senior Seminar in Psychology

(2)

PSY

4410

History and Systems of Psychology

(3)

Professional Electives
(Choose one)

3 hours

PSY

3020

Drugs and Behavior (3)

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology (3)

 

PSY

3310

Psychology of Adjustment (3)

 

PSY

4070

Principles of Counseling (3)

 

PSY

3500

Survey of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3)

 

PSY

4200

Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)

 

PSY

2000

Introduction to Art Therapy (3)

 

Minor

18 hours

General Electives

19 - 21 hours

Total

120 hours

Psychology Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts of Math

(3)

 

 

Elective

(2)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 2

 

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

 

Laboratory Science Option

(3-4)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

 

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

(3)

 

Total 15 or 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

 

 

Minor course

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

PSY

3210

Learning and Cognition

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

 

 

Philosophy option

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PSY

4150

Abnormal Psychology

(3)

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy choice

(2-3)

 

 

Psychology elective

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

PSY

3200

Practicum in Psychology

(1)

 

Total 15 - 16

Semester 6

 

PSY

3000

Behavioral Science Research and Design

(3)

PSY

4410

History and Systems of Psychology

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

PSY

4110

Theories of Personality

(3)

PSY

4320

Physiological Psychology

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

PSY

4350

Senior Seminar in Psychology

(2)

PSY

4510

Career Internship - suggested

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3)

 

 

Elective

(2-4)

 

Total 13-15

Total credit hours

120

Social Work BSSW

General Education

54 hours

PSY 2010 General Psychology and SWK 1200 Introduction to Social Work required for major as general education human science choices.

Major

42 hours

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

SOC

3000

Research Design and Methods

(3)

SWK

2200

Working with Individuals

(3)

SWK

2250

Introduction to Community Service

(3)

SWK

3200

Working with Groups

(3)

SWK

3500

Social Welfare Policy

(3)

SWK

4200

Working with Communities and Organizations

(3)

SWK

4400

Senior Field Practicum

(9)

SWK

4450

Senior Seminar in Social Work

(3)

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

SOC

4200

Advanced Family Relationships

(3)

Strongly Recommended:

 

SOC

3200

Social Problems (3)

 

SOC

3350

US Cultural and Ethnic Diversity (3)

 

Minor

18 hours

General Electives

6 hours

Total

120 hours

Social Work Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

MAT

1040

Concepts of Math

(3)

SCI

1500

Life Science

(3)

SWK

1200

Introduction to Social Work

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

SWK

2250

Introduction to Community Service

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

SOC

2100

Peoples and Cultures of the World

(2)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

SWK

2200

Working with Individuals

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Elective

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

SOC

3200

Social Problems*

(3)

SOC

3500

U.S. Culture and Ethnic Diversity*

(3)

SWK

3200

Working With Groups

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

SOC

3000

Research Design and Methods

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

SWK

3500

Social Welfare Policy

(3)

 

 

Elective or Minor

(3)

 

 

Elective or Minor

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

SOC

4200

Advanced Family Relationships

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

SWK

4200

Working with Communities and Organizations

(3)

 

 

Elective or Minor

(3)

 

 

Elective or Minor

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

SWK

4400

Senior Field Practicum

(9)

SWK

4450

Senior Seminar in Social Work

(3)

 

 

Elective or Minor (advisable to be taken before this semester)

(3)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours

120

*Recommended elective

Certification Programs for BA in History Education with Concentration in Economics or Government (K-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Program section of this Catalog for description.

Social and Behavioral Sciences Minors

Minor in History

18 hours

HIS

4200

Historical Research

(3)

Electives in History numbered 2000 and above

(15)

(3 hours may be in other Social Sciences)

 

Minor in Political Science

18 hours

POL

2000

Introduction to Political Science

(3)

POL

3010

Contemporary Political Thought

(3)

Electives in Political Science numbered 2000 and above

(12)

Minor in Social Science

18 hours

Consists of 6 hours each in three of the following: political science, sociology, economics, history and geography.

Minor in Behavioral Science

18 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

Electives from Sociology, Psychology, or Anthropology (with advisor approval)

(12)

Minor in Sociology

18 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

Electives from Sociology

(15)

(May include 3 hours of Anthropology)

 

Minor in Psychology

18 hours

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

PSY

4150

Abnormal Psychology

(3)

PSY

4110

Theories of Personality

(3)

Additional hours in Psychology

(6)

Minor in Criminal Justice Studies

18 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

SOC

2800

Introduction to Criminology and the Criminal Justice System

(3)

SOC

3410

Corrections

(3)

SOC

3360

Theories of Deviancy

(3)

SOC

3370

Juvenile Delinquency

(3)

SOC

3420

Policing in Society

(3)

 

 

or

 

SOC

4400

Practicum in Criminal Justice

 

Minor in Family Studies

18 hours

SOC

2010

General Sociology

(3)

SOC

2500

The Family in Society

(3)

SOC

3500

Courtship and Marriage

(3)

SOC

3600

Strategies With Changing Families

(3)

SOC

4200

Advanced Family Relationships

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

 

 

or

 

SOC

3170

Gerontology: Sociology of Aging

 

 

 

or

 

PSY

3300

Human Sexual Behavior and Intimate Relationships

 

Minor in Art Therapy

21 hours

PSY

2000

Introduction to Art Therapy

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development*

(3)

PSY

4070

Principles of Counseling

(3)

PSY

4150

Abnormal Psychology*

(3)

ART

2000

Introduction to Drawing

(3)

ART

2030

Introduction to Painting

(3)

ART

2020

Two Dimensional Design

(3)

*Psychology majors may substitute the following:

 

 

 

Any upper division PSY course including PSY 4330 Special Problems in Psychology or PSY 433R Readings in Psychology

 

 

 

Any ART course(s)

 

SWK

3200

Working with Groups and Families

(3)

Minor in Social Work

18 hours

SWK

1200

Introduction to Social Work

(3)

SWK

2200

Working with Individuals

(3)

SWK

2250

Introduction to Community Service

(3)

SWK

3200

Working with Groups

(3)

Choose two of the following:

(6)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development (3)

 

SOC

3200

Social Problems (3)

 

SOC

3350

US Cultural and Ethnic Diversity (3)

 

SWK

4200

Working with Communities and Organizations (3)

 

Social and Behavioral Sciences Course Descriptions

HISTORY

HIS 1400—World Civilization I (3)

A course of study from ancient times to the 1500s dealing with persistent and recurring political, social, and economic issues in history that thinking people have examined and that have shaped our contemporary world. This course covers Western and non-Western cultures. Offered every semester.

HIS 1450—World Civilization II (3)

A course of study from the 1500s to the present dealing with persistent and recurring political, social, and economic issues in history that thinking people have examined and that have shaped our contemporary world. This course covers Western and non-Western cultures. Offered every semester.

HIS 2010—United States History Survey I (3)

Survey of United States' social, political, economic, and military development to 1877. Offered annually.

HIS 2020—United States History Survey II (3)

Survey of United States' social, political, economic, and military development from 1877 to the present. Offered annually.

HIS 2200—European History Survey I (3)

A survey of the political, economic, intellectual and social developments in the Mediterranean Basin and Western Europe from ancient civilizations until 1650. Offered alternate years.

HIS 2300—European History Survey II (3)

Covers European history from 1650 until 1914. It traces the development of nation states with respect to the social, political, intellectual, and economic revolutions of Europe.

Prerequisite for 3000/4000 level history courses: HIS 1400 or HIS 1450.

HIS 3120—Revolutionary War (3)

A study in the social, political, and economic causes and consequences of the American Revolution and the conflict's impact on the formation and development of the country from the French and Indian War to the Constitution's ratification.

HIS 3130—Civil War and Reconstruction (3)

A study of Civil War's social, political, economic, and military aspects from the Ante-bellum era to Reconstruction. Alternate years.

HIS 3140—The United States in World War II (3)

A study of the United States during the World War II era that includes the conflict's origins and aftermath, as well as its social, political, military, and economic impact. Alternate years.

HIS 3170—Latin American History (3)

A survey of the development of the Central and South American nations, from settlement to the present day. Alternate years.

HIS 3180—Living History Seminar (2-4)

In-depth travel seminars to selected sites of historical significance in the U.S. and Europe.

HIS 3200—Twentieth Century Europe (3)

Focuses on European political, diplomatic, and social trends from World War I until the present. Alternate years.

HIS 3210—Middle Tennessee History Seminar (3)

In-depth travel seminar involving the study of Middle Tennessee history. Offered annually.

HIS 3220—East Tennessee History Seminar (3)

In-depth travel seminar involving the study of East Tennessee history. Summer only.

HIS 3250—Modern British History (3)

A survey of the British Isles, emphasizing the growth of British democracy and its influence on the American system. Offered as warranted.

HIS 3260—History of Asia (3)

Examines the political, social and economic development of Russia and the Far Eastern nations. Offered alternate years.

HIS 3400—History of Russia (3)

A survey of the political, religious, and cultural changes in Russia from the tenth century through the present.

HIS 3500—Revolutions and Reformations (3)

Explores the major events of European history between the years 1450 and 1700, including the Catholic Reformation and protestant reformations and political revolutions in England, France, the Netherlands, and the Holy Roman Empire. The course is designed to trace the development of early modern European civilization and its profound religious and political influence upon the subsequent development of the modern world.

HIS 3900—Special Topics in European History (3)

Explores a variety of particular topics in European history as designated by the professor.

HIS 4200—Historical Research (3)

Concentrates on the process of historical research with particular attention to research methodology and preparation of a research paper. Offered annually. Prerequisite: a minimum of twelve hours in history.

HIS 433R—Readings in History (1-3)

Great historical writings, adapted to the student's needs and interests. Limited to advanced students, approved by instructor.

HIS 4330—Directed Study in History (1-3)

Independent projects under faculty direction in areas of special interest to students.

HIS 4700—Senior Seminar (1)

A culminating seminar for History, History/Political Science and Social Science majors. This course will involve research and writing in the major area and an exit examination with members of the major department faculty. Offered annually.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POL 2000—Introduction to Political Science (3)

The basic theory, vocabulary, and methods of analysis in the study of politics. Alternate years.

POL 2020—American Political Institutions (3)

The origins and development of American government, with emphasis on the concept of participatory democracy as practiced in our republican form. Offered annually.

POL 3000—International Relations (3)

Examines the basic factors of contemporary world politics; the state system, ideologies, nationalism, imperialism, and nongovernmental organizations. Alternate years.

POL 3010—Contemporary Political Thought (3)

Analyzes major theorists and schools of modem political thought including current ideologies. Alternate years.

POL 3020—American Constitutional Law (3)

An introduction to major issues in constitutional development, particularly in the areas of civil rights and personal freedoms. Offered as warranted.

POL 3030—Introduction to Legal Studies (3)

Designed to provide an introduction to the concept of legal education, to the requirements and procedures for entry into graduate law school, and to cover some of the standard legal terminology and concepts utilized in the American system. The class uses the seminar format, and sample LSAT tests will be used as preparation for application to law school. Alternate years.

POL 3040—State and Local Government (3)

Designed to introduce the student to the historical development of principles and practices of modern government systems at the state and local levels. The classroom experience will be supplemented by visits to state and local government meetings. Offered alternate years.

POL 3050—Federal Seminar (3)

A week-long seminar in Washington, D.C., involving participants in lectures, group sessions, and visits to various government agencies. Alternate years.

POL 3060, 3061, 3062—TISL Practicum (1), (1), (1)

A supervised experience with the annual Tennessee Intercollegiate State Legislature. The student participates in a four-day mock assembly, with lead up and follow-up activities, featuring the interchange of ideas on current political issues. Fall semester. Graded S/U.

POL 3070—Law and Public Policy (3)

A course designed to introduce the actors and processes involved in the formulation of public policy at all levels of government. The focus is on developing a Christian perspective on policy development and the tools with which to analyze and influence policy as a responsible citizen. Alternate years.

POL 3900—Special Topics in European Politics (3)

Explores a variety of particular topics in European politics as designated by the professor.

POL 4000—Tennessee Legislative Internship (8)

A practicum experience with the Tennessee General Assembly, directed by that body, providing direct experience as an administrative aide to an Assembly member in session. Offered Spring Semester to selected students. Graded S/U.

POL 4100—Political Science Project (4)

An optional research project which may be taken for extra credit in conjunction with the Tennessee Legislative Internship.

POL 4330—Directed Study in Political Science (1-3)

Independent projects under faculty supervision.

POL 4510—Career Internship in Political Science (1-3)

Supervised field work in the office of an attorney or a legislator or other public service agency which deals with political life. The purpose is to give first-hand experience with the work of such professionals. Credit is commensurate with time spent on the job. No more than 6 credit hours may be counted toward a major or minor in political science. Graded S/U.

GEOGRAPHY

GGY 2050—Fundamentals of World Geography (3)

An introduction to geography that explores the impact of geography on the world's major social, linguistic, religious, and economic systems.

GGY 4330—Directed Study in Geography (1-3)

Self-study under faculty direction in areas of special interest to students.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 1950—Marriage Enrichment (3)

Designed for married students only, this course assists couples in evaluating and enriching their relationship. Interactive and practical, focus is on identifying both the interferences to and characteristics of a healthy marriage.

SOC 2010—General Sociology (3)

The nature and functions of sociology, the development of social ideas and institutions and the processes of social interactions and social structure. Prerequisite to courses in Sociology numbered above 2000.

SOC 2100—Peoples and Cultures of the World (2)

An introductory look at various countries and cultures around the world. Major aspects of each country/culture will be examined, with particular attention being paid to people groups, government, cultural traditions, social institutions, religion, and current events taking place in chosen countries and cultures of the world.

SOC 2500—The Family in Society (3)

A study of the functions of the institution of family and the inter-relationship of family and other major institutions in society including the ways in which current social conditions and cultural, ethnic, and economic diversity influence this relationship. Current sociological research on family behavior will be examined and a Christian perspective on family emphasized.

SOC 2800—Introduction to Criminology and the Criminal Justice System (3)

A study of the theoretical causes of criminal behavior and the basics of the criminal justice system. The course examines the criminal and delinquent behavior theories, the methods of control and rehabilitation in our criminal justice system from a social/environmental viewpoint, and also law enforcement, the courts, and the correctional system.

SOC 3000—Social Science Research Methods and Design (3)

An introduction to the basic skills necessary in conducting empirical research in the social sciences. Topics covered will include the logic of science in sociology and the social sciences, literature reviews, design and measurement, use of primary and secondary data, ethical issues in research, and writing research reports. Emphasis is placed on field research and the methods for conducting and analyzing research in various social settings.

SOC 3100—Criminal Investigation (3)

Includes instruction in general investigative responsibilities and techniques, including administration, preparation, investigative jurisdiction and responsibility, and the importance of substantive report writing. Students will be introduced to crime scene investigation-- its purpose and use.

SOC 3110—Criminal Law and Procedure (2)

A comprehensive introduction to criminal law and accompanying procedure in the criminal justice system. The course covers common law and statutory elements of crime, including crimes against persons, property crimes, public morality offenses, and defenses to crime. A concise look at criminal procedure and the criminal court system is also provided.

SOC 3170—Gerontology: Sociology of Aging (3)

The study (1) of aging, (2) the social problems of the aging person, (3) developing an outlet for the tremendous potential represented by persons among the retired, and (4) community agencies for the older person.

SOC 3200—Social Problems (3)

A sociological description and analysis of some of the contemporary social problems in American Society with an emphasis on programs designed to help remedy these problems.

SOC 3300—Urban Sociology (3)

Population changes, institutional changes and problems developing in urban societies. A section on urban planning and urban ministry is included.

SOC 3350—U.S. Cultural and Ethnic Diversity (3)

Examines the social situation among American ethnic minorities. Analysis of cultural factors and their effects on majority-minority interpersonal relationships is included. Cross listed as COM 3350.

SOC 3360—Theories of Deviancy (3)

An examination of the social causes and consequences of delinquency, criminality, addiction, insanity, social unconventionality, and other deviant behavior. The course also explores differing views on the subject throughout history.

SOC 3370—Juvenile Delinquency (3)

An examination of the nature, causes, and extent of juvenile delinquency. The course also explores the various segments of the juvenile justice system, including law enforcement, juvenile court, juvenile legal rights, and correction.

SOC 3410—Corrections (3)

A study of the history and practice of probation, parole, community-based corrections, and detention facilities. Also included is a history and analysis of major correctional systems.

SOC 3420—Policing in Society (3)

An analysis of the functions, problems, history, procedures, and structure of policing administrations, also including the politics of law enforcement.

SOC 3500—Courtship and Marriage (3)

Designed to assist the student in preparation for Christian marriage. The course suggests guidelines for mate selection, identifies common problem areas in marital adjustment, and provides general information to assist students in making appropriate choices with regard to marriage and family relationships within a context of Christian values. No prerequisites.

SOC 3600—Strategies with Changing Families (3)

An examination of the unique challenges for families precipitated by movement from traditional to alternative family forms. Particular attention will be given to: (1) divorce situations with an exploration of the reasons contributing to its increase in frequency and the consequence this has had upon all family members; (2) single parent households; (3) blended families; and (4) dual career marriages.

SOC 3710—Practicum in Intercultural and Community Development Skills (3)

A field-based, experiential course designed to introduce the student to developmental skills for cross-cultural community service or ministry. Students are also introduced to skills needed for initiating and maintaining sustainable communities. This course is offered through the HEART institute (Lake Wales, FL). Students must be pre-approved before enrolling. Cross listed as PRA 3710 and COM 3710.

SOC 3800—Social Theory (3)

Major classical and contemporary sociological perspectives such as symbolic interactionism, functionalism, and conflict sociology. Attention to the orientation and style of outstanding representatives of each perspective. Analysis in terms of basic concepts, central questions, substantive themes, methodology, and bearing on contemporary social issues.

SOC 4200—Advanced Family Relationships (3)

An examination of parent-child interaction and family structure emphasizing a family systems theoretical perspective. Special attention is given to what constitutes family health, family dysfunction, and the stages of the family life cycle. The course will also examine several approaches to family intervention.

SOC 4300—Special Topics in Sociology (3)

Designed to provide topics of interest that are not normally part of the curriculum and that can be offered on a one-time only or irregular basis. Topics will come from the fields of sociology, criminal justice and social work and will be available as electives.

SOC 4330—Directed Study in Sociology (1-3)

Individual study which provides opportunity for majors and minors to pursue some areas of interest in depth which are not covered in regular course work.

SOC 4350—Senior Seminar in Behavioral Science (2)

Readings, discussions, reports in interest areas, and senior projects for Behavioral Science majors concentrating in sociology. Prerequisite: Senior classification.

SOC 4360—Senior Seminar in Sociology (1)

Serves as a culminating experience for the undergraduate study in sociology. It is designed to help students review, assess, and present what they have learned in sociology and make the transition to next stages of their lives.

SOC 4400—Practicum/Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice (3)

A supervised practicum that provides the student with experience in an actual police, court, correctional or other criminal justice setting. Prerequisite: 12 hours completed in the criminology concentration.

SOC 4600—Senior Research Seminar in Social Science (3)

A senior capstone course focusing on research design and methodology in the social sciences. Research design, methods and senior projects will be individualized to the student's particular concentrations.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 2000—Introduction to Art Therapy (3)

An introduction to the field of art therapy. History of art therapy, theoretical approaches, developmental perspectives on art, assessment, art and pathology, and ethics will be addressed. Experience with various art therapy techniques will be included.

PSY 2010—General Psychology (3)

General introduction to major areas of psychology with emphasis on the psychological bases for understanding human behavior. Prerequisite to other psychology courses except PSY 2175.

PSY 2060—Behavioral Science Statistics (3)

An introductory course in statistics. Topics include basic measurement concepts, frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and variability, the normal curve, standard scores, correlation, regression, random sampling and probability, binomial distribution, hypothesis testing, t test, ANOVA, and nonparametric tests. Introduction to SPSS is also included.

PSY 2175—Human Growth and Development (3)

A survey of development from conception throughout the life span.

PSY 3000—Behavioral Science Research Methods (3)

An introduction to designing and conducting behavioral research. Includes theory related to the scientific method, generating hypotheses, reviewing literature, ethics, operational definitions, and experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental designs. The student will conduct an original research study including literature review, data collection, analysis of data via SPSS, interpretation of results, and writing results in APA format. Prerequisite: PSY 2060.

PSY 3010—Educational Psychology (3)

The application of psychological principles to teaching and learning. Includes field experience in a school.

PSY 3020—Drugs and Behavior (3)

An introductory survey of the field of psychoactive drugs.

PSY 3120—Social Psychology (3)

An examination of the psychological principles which function in the social behavior of the individual and group. The impact of social groups on individual behavior and the causes and motives of social behavior are emphasized.

PSY 3200—Practicum in Psychology (1)

Practical supervised experience in a local mental health setting. Open to junior or senior Psychology and Behavioral Science majors. Graded S/U. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Strongly recommended: PSY 4070, 4150.

PSY 3210—Learning and Cognition (3)

Survey of research and experiments in animal and human learning and the major theories of learning. Students also study the mental activities associated with thinking, knowing and remembering.

PSY 3300—Human Sexual Behavior and Intimate Relationships (3)

An examination of the nature and meaning of human sexuality as part of one's total personality structure and how this relates to intimate relationships. Consideration will be given to physiological, social, and cultural aspects of human sexual nature and behaviors. As such, particular attention will be given to identifying what constitutes healthy and successful sexuality within relationships.

PSY 3310—Psychology of Adjustment (3)

Study of psychological concepts and techniques that enhance one's adjustment.

PSY 3411—Introduction to the Exceptional Learner (3)

An overview of the issues related to the characteristics of the exceptional learner. Concepts of learning and classroom management in the public school are considered.

PSY 3500—Survey of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3)

An introductory survey of readings and cases in industrial and organizational psychology with regard to the application of psychology to business and industry. Topics will include the interpersonal and organizational management systems, career and employee selection, work analysis, performance appraisal, psychological testing, training and job design, safety, work/life stress, and communication. Prerequisite: PSY 2010.

PSY 4020—Educational Tests and Measurements (2)

Examines test construction and application of evaluation principles related to K-12. Emphasis on exposure to achievement, intelligence, personality, and teacher constructed instruments. Prerequisites: EDU 2600, and admission to the Teacher Education program.

PSY 4070—Principles of Counseling (3)

Theories and techniques of personal counseling.

PSY 4110—Theories of Personality (3)

The nature of personality and major theories of personality development with Christian emphasis in interpretation.

PSY 4150—Abnormal Psychology (3)

Survey of the causes, forms and methods of treating behavior abnormalities.

PSY 4200—Introduction to Psychological Testing (3)

Exposure to various psychological testing instruments including personality, intelligence, interest, and ability. Students will participate in taking, administering, and scoring selected tests. Alternate years.

PSY 4320—Physiological Psychology (3)

Acquaints students with the physiological structures and functions that are of interest to a behavioral scientist. Alternate years.

PSY 433R—Readings in Psychology (1-3)

An advanced course in the literature of psychology designed to meet the students needs and interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

PSY 4330—Special Problems in Psychology (1-3)

For psychology majors or minors, intensive study in areas of special interest. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

PSY 4350—Senior Seminar in Psychology (2)

Readings, discussions, reports in interest areas, senior projects for Psychology majors. Prerequisite: Senior Classification. May be taken by Behavioral Science majors concentrating in Psychology.

PSY 4410—History and Systems of Psychology (3)

Survey of the history of development of modern psychology. Alternate years.

PSY 4510—Career Internship in Psychology (1-3)

Supervised field experience in mental health or research settings. Open to junior or senior psychology and behavioral science majors with departmental permission. Supervised in coordination with the Career Planning Office. (Maximum 6 hours.) Graded S/U.

SOCIAL WORK

SWK 1200—Introduction to Social Work (3)

An introduction to the profession of social work and its role within the field of social welfare. Models of generalist social work practice, history of social welfare, summaries of human behavior theories, concepts of social work research, and knowledge of at-risk client populations are introduced.

SWK 2200—Working with Individuals (3)

An introduction to the basic principles and processes needed to work with individuals. Focus is on generic problem-solving processes, including interviewing and developing relationships, used in helping people with problems in daily living. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

SWK 2250—Introduction to Community Service (3)

Student participation in a local social welfare agency setting which includes 60 hours of volunteer service. Student learns about the work of the agency in the community and has the opportunity to learn first hand about working with different kinds of people. Classroom seminar accompanies this initial experience in the field. Arrangements with the agency must be made the preceding semester.

SWK 3200—Working with Groups (3)

Teaches the foundations of social work practice with groups. Group process and techniques are taught as they apply to working with various kinds of groups. Designed to enable the future helping professional to meet the challenge of working with groups and includes a practicum experience to assist in this process.

SWK 3500—Social Welfare Policy (3)

A detailed study of the history of social welfare, an initiation of problem-focused analyses of current social welfare policies and programs, followed by student formulation of a policy for the future. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

SWK 4200—Working with Communities and Organizations (3)

The third course in a three-semester course continuum for beginning practice in the field of social work. Theory and models of practice on a macro level, planning, and social work administration are emphasized. Macro interventions with oppressed groups are explored. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

SWK 4330—Directed Study in Social Work (1-3)

Individualized study which provides opportunity for social work majors to pursue research and other interests not available in regular course work.

SWK 4400—Senior Field Practicum

A 360- to 480-hour field practicum supervised by a faculty liaison and an agency-based field instructor with the M.S.W. degree. Arrangements with the agency must be made in April of preceding year. For Senior Social Work Majors Only who have completed all social work required courses.

SWK 4450—Senior Seminar in Social Work (3)

The coordinating seminar, taken concurrently with SWK 4400, Senior Field Practicum, to enable the student to synthesize practice skills acquired in the field with theories, knowledge and values learned in the classroom. For Senior Social Work Majors Only who have completed all social work required courses.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ATH 3010—Introduction to Anthropology (3)

A study of the meaning of culture, the diversity of cultures in both the contemporary world and the past, and the manner by which cultures have adapted and developed. Attention will be given to the work of anthropological theorists and to the four subdivisions of anthropology: cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, linguistics and archaeology.