School of Arts and Sciences

ADMINISTRATORS

LENA HEGI WELCH, Dean, School of Arts and Sciences

DAVID DEESE, Chair, Department of Communication Studies

JOOLY PHILIP, Chair, Department of English

JOSEPH COLE, Chair, Department of Exercise and Sport Science

DAVID DIEHL, Chair, Department of Music

ALAN SMITH, Chair, Department of Science and Mathematics

TBN, Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

LAURIE WOODS, Director, Criminal Justice Program

School of Arts and Sciences General Information

The School of Arts and Sciences is composed of six academic departments: the Department of Communication Studies, the Department of English, the Department of Exercise and Sport Science, the Department of Music, the Department of Science and Mathematics, and the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. The School also offers a non-traditional undergraduate program in Criminal Justice, which is a part of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Students who graduate from this school have both professional expertise and a liberal arts education.

A liberal arts education has its origins in the Medieval University and is a philosophy of education that empowers learners with broad knowledge and transferable skills and a stronger sense of values, ethics, and civic commitment. Usually global and diverse in scope, it includes a general education curriculum that provides broad exposure to multiple disciplines in addition to in-depth study in at least one academic area. General Education Program courses are offered through all six of the academic departments. Courses leading to academic majors in many fields are also offered through the School of Arts and Sciences.

The School of Arts and Sciences is concerned with the humane dimensions of academic study. Course work offered in the School emphasizes imparting general knowledge as well as professional, vocational, or technical expertise. The School seeks to engender a broader understanding of life and faith facilitated by liberal arts in the context of the Christian faith. While students are prepared for graduate study or a career through instruction, the school's first concern is an educated person prepared for leadership and service.