Undergraduate Curriculum Chart

Department

Degree

Major

Minor Studies

Pre-Professional

Interdepartmental

AA

General Studies

 

 

School of Arts and Sciences

 

 

Department of

BS

Interpersonal Communication

Interpersonal Communication

 

Communication

BS

Mass Media

Mass Media

 

Studies

BS

Journalism

Journalism

 

 

BS

Organizational Communication

Organizational Communication

 

 

BS

Communication Studies

Communication Studies

 

 

BA

Communication Studies

Art

 

 

BA

Dramatic Arts

Dramatic Arts

 

 

BA

Speech Communication Education*

Applied Theatre

 

 

BA

Theatre Education*

 

 

Department of

BA

English

English

 

English

BA

English Education*

Creative Writing

 

Department of

BS

Music (General)

Music

 

Music

BA

Music (Commercial)

Songwriting

 

 

BS

Music Education*

Worship Leading

 

 

 

 

Jazz Studies

 

 

 

 

Music Technology

 

 

 

 

Music Theatre Interdisciplinary

 

 

 

 

Composition

 

Department of

BS

Physical Education Education*

Physical/ Health Education

 

Exercise and Sport

BS

Exercise Science

Exercise Science

 

Science

 

Fitness Industry/Sales

 

 

 

 

Fitness Management

 

 

 

 

Personal Training/
Strength and Conditioning

 

 

 

 

Pre-Physical Therapy

 

 

 

 

Pre-Occupational Therapy/
Athletic Training

 

 

 

 

Nutrition

 

 

 

 

Sport Psychology

 

 

 

BS

Sport Management

Sport Science

 

 

 

Broadcasting

 

 

 

 

Business

 

 

 

 

Coaching/Recreation

 

 

 

 

Marketing

 

 

 

 

Ministry

 

 

 

 

Sport Psychology

 

 

Department of

BS

Biology

Biology

Pre-Physical Therapy

Science and

BS

Biology Education*

Environmental Science

Pre-Medical

Mathematics

BS

General Science

General Science

Pre-Dental

 

BS

Chemistry

Physical Science

Pre-Pharmacy

 

BS

Chemistry Education*

Chemistry

Pre-Physician Assistant

 

BS

Mathematics

Mathematics

Pre-Veterinary

 

 

Pure Mathematics

 

 

 

 

Applied Mathematics

 

 

 

BS

Mathematics Education*

 

 

 

BS

Financial Mathematics

 

 

 

BS

Mathematical Biology Interdisciplinary

 

 

 

BS

Physics

Physics

 

 

BS

Applied Physics

 

 

 

 

Physics

 

 

 

 

Pre-Engineering

 

Pre-Engineering

 

BS

Physics Education*

 

 

 

BS

Medical Technology†

 

 

 

BSN

Nursing

 

Pre-Nursing

Department of

BA

History

History

Pre-Law

Social

BA

History and Political Science

Political Science

 

and Behavioral

BA

History Education*

Legal Studies

 

Sciences

BS

Behavioral Science

Behavioral Science

 

 

BS

Criminal Justice Studies

Criminal Justice Studies

 

 

BSSW

Social Work

Social Work

 

 

BS

Psychology

Psychology

 

 

BA

Sociology

Sociology

 

 

 

 

Social Science

 

 

BS

Criminal Justice (degree completion)†

Family Studies

 

 

 

 

Art Therapy

 

School of Business and Technology

 

 

 

 

BA

Management and Human Relations (degree completion)

General Business

 

 

BS

Computer Information Technology (degree completion)

 

 

 

BS

Health Information Technology (degree completion)

 

 

Department of

BBA

Business Administration

Business Administration

 

Business

 

Accounting

Accounting

 

Administration

 

Community Development

Economics/Finance

 

 

 

Digital Multimedia Communication

 

 

 

 

E-Commerce

 

 

 

 

Information Technology

 

 

 

 

Music Business

Music Business

 

 

 

Marketing

Marketing

 

 

 

Management

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management

 

 

 

Professional Accountancy

Economics

 

 

BS

Business Education*

 

 

Department of

BS

Information Technology

Information Technology

 

Information Technology

 

Digital Graphic Design and Multimedia

Digital Graphic Design and Multimedia

 

 

 

Specialized Computing

Digital Multimedia Communication

 

 

 

Web Development

E-Commerce

 

 

AS

Information Technology

 

 

School of Education

 

 

 

Department of

BS

Elementary Education*†

Elementary Education
(non-licensure)

 

Teacher Education

BS

Early Childhood Education*†

Middle School Education
(non-licensure)

 

 

BS

Special Education*†

Secondary Education
(non-licensure)

 

 

 

 

English Language Learners
(non-licensure)

 

BS

Interdisciplinary Studies*

Education (Professional Core)

 

 

 

Early Childhood Pre-K-3

 

 

 

 

Elementary K-6

 

 

 

 

Special Education High Incidence K-12

 

 

 

BS

Studies in Education (non-teaching)

Early Childhood Curriculum
(non-teaching)

 

 

 

 

Elementary Curriculum
(non-teaching)

 

 

 

 

Exceptional Student Curriculum (non-teaching)

 

 

AS

Child Care and Supervision

 

 

Millard Reed School of Religion

 

 

Department of

BA

Religion

Professional Pastoral Ministry

 

Religion and

BA

Religious Studies

Professional Compassionate Ministry

 

Philosophy

BA

Intercultural Studies

Professional Children's Ministry

 

 

BA

Christian Ministry
(Salvation Army)

Professional Youth Ministry

 

 

 

 

Professional Worship Ministry

 

 

 

 

Professional Intercultural Studies

 

 

 

 

New Testament Greek

 

 

 

 

Philosophy

 

 

 

 

Religious Studies

 

 

 

 

Biblical Studies

 

 

 

 

Biblical Hebrew

 

 

 

 

Biblical Languages

 

 

 

 

Children's Ministry

 

 

 

 

Youth Ministry

 

 

 

 

Compassionate Ministry

 

 

 

 

Intercultural Studies

 

Interdisciplinary Programs

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership Studies

Leadership Studies

 

 

BS

Social Justice

Social Justice

 

 

 

 

Professional Public Policy

 

 

 

 

Professional Environmental Justice

 

 

 

 

Professional and Nonprofit Congregational Leadership

 

 

BA

Worship Arts

Worship Arts

 

 

BA

Worship and Church Ministry

Religion

 

*A program leading to teacher certification is available in these fields. Changes in endorsement requirements at the Tennessee State Department of Education level may require changes in published Trevecca programs in teacher education.

Being discontinued. Not accepting applications.

Graduate Programs

To encourage and provide continued professional growth opportunities, Trevecca offers the following programs:

Graduate Education Program

Master of Arts

Teaching K-6

Teaching 7-12

Master of Arts in Education

Teaching

Master of Education

Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction K-12

Educational Leadership K-12

English Language Learners PreK-12

Instructional Technology PreK-12*

Leading Instructional Improvement for Teachers PreK-12

Reading PreK-12*

Special Education K-12*

Visual Impairments Special Education

* Approved but not currently being offered.

Doctor of Education:

Leadership and Professional Practice

Graduate Library Science Program

Master of Library and Information Science K-12

Graduate Business Program

Master of Science:

Management

Information Technology

Master of Business Administration:

Management

Information Technology†

Graduate Physician Assistant Program

Master of Science:

Medicine (Physician Assistant)

Graduate Counseling Program

Master of Arts:

Counseling

Counseling Psychology†

Master of Marriage and Family Therapy

Doctor of Philosophy:

Clinical Counseling: Teaching and Supervision

Graduate Religion Program

Master of Arts:

Preaching

Biblical Studies

Theological Studies

Graduate Organizational Leadership

Master of Organizational Leadership

†Being discontinued. Not accepting applications.

College of Lifelong Learning

The College of Lifelong Learning is the primary unit at the University providing services to non-traditional students enrolled in adult degree completion programs, graduate studies, and online courses within the four university schools.  The services include marketing, recruitment, admissions, and enrollment help for students in all non-traditional programs.  In some cases, the CLL is involved with student advising, providing student support services, course and faculty scheduling, and improving the instructional use of technology. The goal of the unit is to provide all services necessary and desired by each of the schools to ensure the highest level of effectiveness with the greatest efficiency.

Off-Campus Studies

Trevecca offers a number of off-campus for-credit learning opportunities to students. Because of the nature of these programs, students are advised to work with the financial aid office to determine whether or not aid is available to them for a particular program.

Council for Christian Colleges and Universities

Trevecca Nazarene University is one of 113 members in the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, a Washington D.C.-based organization which was founded in 1976. Students benefit directly from Trevecca's involvement in the CCCU through participation in Culture-Shaping Programs including the Washington-based American Studies Program (ASP), the Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC), the Contemporary Music Center (CMC), the Washington Journalism Center (WJS) in Washington D.C., and the Culture-Crossing Programs including the Australian Studies Centre (ASC), the Latin American Studies Program (LASP) in Costa Rica, the Oxford Summer Programme (OSP) at Oxford University, the Middle-East Studies Program (MESP) in Cairo, the China Studies Program (CSP), the Scholars' Semester in Oxford (SSO), the India Studies Program (ISP), and the Uganda Studies Program (USP). A partial description of each program as presented by CCCU is listed below. Eligibility requirements and detailed program descriptions are available at www.bestsemester.com. Trevecca generally assigns credit as recommended by the individual programs. Some offer specific course credits; others offer variable credits. While Trevecca works with other institutions in the offering of these credits, matters related to approval, acceptance of coursework, the assignment of grades, and course titles and descriptions are determined by Trevecca personnel and must be in compliance with Trevecca's policies and procedures.* Application materials and information on these programs can be secured from the Center for Leadership, Calling and Service. Completion of Trevecca application materials should be prerequisite to processing the online application available on the BestSemester Web site. Because of the nature of these programs, students are advised to work with the financial aid office to determine whether or not aid is available to them for a particular programs.

*Note: When the possibility of 18 credit hours is indicated, enrollment requires prior approval of the program and the home campus.

American Studies Program

Since 1976, the American Studies Program has served as an experiential learning laboratory for students committed to connecting their faith to public affairs. More than 2,500 students have come to Washington and nearly 500 alumni currently work in the DC metro area in a variety of professional fields—private and public, for-profit and non-profit. Each student enrolls in the program's two practicum courses: Internship and Topics in Leadership & Vocation. Students have the option of enrolling in a one-credit Professional Mentorship course. In addition, students apply to either the Public Policy track or the Global Development track. The Public Policy track equips and supports students in their analysis of a pressing public policy issue. Each student produces original research by engaging area experts and practitioners off-site and in the classroom as they investigate the local, national, and global factors that influence policy-making in Washington, DC. The Global Development track focuses on partnership initiatives taken by leaders in commercial, governmental and non-governmental organizations as they explore the impact they can achieve by collaborating to address issues of sustainable development worldwide. ASP students earn 15–16 semester hours of credit.

Contemporary Music Center

The Contemporary Music Center provides students with the opportunity to live and work in the refining context of community while seeking to understand how God will have them integrate music, faith and business. The CMC offers three tracks: Artist, Business and Technical. The Artist Track is tailored to students considering careers as vocalists, musicians, songwriters, recording artists, performers and producers. The Business Track is designed for business, arts management, marketing, communications and related majors interested in possible careers as artist managers, agents, record company executives, music publishers, concert promoters and entertainment industry entrepreneurs. The Technical Track prepares students for careers in live sound, concert lighting and studio recording. Students within each of the tracks receive instruction, experience and a uniquely Christ-centered perspective on creativity and the marketplace, while working together to create and market a recording of original music. Each track includes coursework, labs, directed study and a practicum. CMC students earn 16 semester hours of credit.

Los Angeles Film Studies Center

Founded in 1991, the Los Angeles Film Studies Center trains students to serve in various aspects of the film industry with professional skill and Christian integrity. Each semester, students live, learn and work in L.A. The curriculum consists of two required seminars: Hollywood Production Workshop and Faith and Artistic Development in Film, focusing on the role of film in culture and the relationship of faith to work in this very influential industry. In addition, students choose one elective course from a variety of offerings in film studies. Internships in various segments of the film industry provide students with hands-on experience. The combination of the internship and seminars allows students to explore the film industry within a Christian context and from a liberal arts perspective. LAFSC students earn 16 semester hours of credit.

Washington Journalism Center

The Washington Journalism Center (WJC) is a semester-long study program in Washington, D.C., created for students interested in the field of journalism. While in Washington students take classes focusing on their personal writing skills and on the history and future of the media. These classes—Foundations for Media Involvement; Reporting in Washington; and Washington, News and Public Discourse—combined with an internship at a top news publication help students learn to integrate their faith in a journalism career. Students also participate in service learning opportunities as part of the WJC experience. WJC students earn 16 semester hours of credit.

Australia Studies Centre

Since Spring 2004, the CCCU has partnered with the Wesley Institute in Sydney, Australia, to offer the Australia Studies Centre. Throughout the semester, students study theology, global justice issues affecting Australia, Indigenous cultures and the arts. Every student is required to take the courses "The View from Australia: Issues in Religion, Politics, Economics and Cultural Values" and "Indigenous History, Cultures and Identity." Additionally, students choose electives from Wesley Institute offerings in theology/ministry, music, drawing/graphic design, drama, dance, dance movement therapy, and counseling. Students live with Australian families and volunteer with local community service providers. In order to experience the various aspects of Australian culture, students spend time in the Australian capital, Canberra; travel to the edge of the Australian Outback; and spend the last week of the semester connecting with the Maori people in New Zealand. ASC students earn 16–18* semester hours of credit.

China Studies Program

The China Studies Program enables students to engage China's ancient history and intrigue from an insider's perspective. While immersed in Chinese culture, students participate in seminar courses on the historical, cultural, religious, geographic and economic realities of this strategic, populous, and extremely influential nation. Students choose between completing a broad Chinese Studies Concentration or a Business Concentration, which includes an internship at a Chinese-owned and operated business in China. Students also study standard Chinese language with a goal of attaining the ability to handle everyday transactions in Mandarin. The program begins the semester in Hong Kong and introduces students to the diversity of China, including the capital city of Beijing, legendary Shanghai, ancient Xi'an and beautiful seaside Xiamen. This interdisciplinary, cross-cultural program enables students to communicate and understand the unique culture and people of China with an informed, Christ-centered perspective. CSP students earn 16-18* semester hours of credit.

Latin American Studies Program

Based in San José, Costa Rica, the Latin American Studies Program introduces students to a wide range of experiences through the study of the language, literature, culture, politics, history, economics, ecology and religion of the region. Through living with local families, students become a part of the day-to-day lives of Latin Americans. Students also take part in a practicum/internship and travel to nearby Central American nations. Students participate in one of four concentrations: Latin American studies (offered both fall and spring terms); advanced language and literature (designed for Spanish majors and offered both fall and spring terms); international business (offered only in fall terms); and environmental science (offered only during spring terms). Depending on their concentration, students travel to nearby Central American nations including Nicaragua, Guatemala, Cuba and Panama. LASP students earn 16-18* semester credits.

Middle East Studies Program

Based in Cairo, Egypt, this program offers students a unique opportunity to explore and interact with the complex and strategically important world of the modern Middle East. Students explore diverse religious, social, cultural and political traditions of Middle Eastern peoples through interdisciplinary seminars. They also study the Arabic language and may work as volunteers with various organizations in Cairo. Through travel in the region (typically Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan, Syria and Turkey), students are exposed to the diversity and dynamism of the local culture. At a time of tension and change in the Middle East, MESP encourages and equips students to relate to the Muslim, Eastern Christian and Jewish worlds in an informed, constructive and Christ-centered manner. MESP students earn 16 semester hours of credit.

Scholars' Semester in Oxford

The Scholars' Semester in Oxford is designed for students who want to study intensively and to a high standard. Students develop their academic writing and research skills and explore the disciplines and interests of their choice. As Visiting Students of Oxford University and members of Wycliffe Hall, students study in the oldest university in the English speaking world. SSO students enroll in a primary and secondary tutorial, an integrative seminar (or thesis in the case of second term students), and the British landscape course. Students group their work in a concentration so that all elements of their programme work together. SSO is designed for students interested in art history, classics, English language and literature, history, modern languages (French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Russian), musicology, philosophy, and theology, though all majors may apply. SSO also offers 18 thematic or integrative concentrations such as history and philosophy of science and social sciences. Applicants are generally honors and other very high-achieving students and must have at minimum a 3.5 GPA to be considered for the programme. SSO students earn 17 semester hours of credit for a semester and may complete two semesters of the programme.

Oxford Summer Programme

The Oxford Summer Programme (OSP) allows students, as affiliate members of Wycliffe Hall, University of Oxford, to do intensive scholarship in the oldest university in the English speaking world. During the five-week programme, students hone their research and writing skills and delve into the areas that interest them the most while exploring the relationship between Christianity and the development of the British Isles. Seminars and tutorials are given on specialized topics under expert Oxford academics in the areas of English language and literature, history, including the history of art and history of science, philosophy, and theology and the study of religion. The programme is structured for rising college sophomores, juniors, and seniors, graduate and seminary students, non-traditional students, teachers, and those enrolled in continuing education programs. OSP students earn 6 semester hours of credit.

Uganda Studies Program

The Uganda Studies Program provides students with both immersion in a local community and broad exposure to a variety of people and places in Uganda and Rwanda. Students in the Uganda Studies Emphasis (USE) and Social Work Emphasis (SWE) share their lives with university students, living primarily on campus at Uganda Christian University (UCU), an international affiliate member of the CCCU, located 15 miles east of the capital city of Kampala. They also participate in two short home stay experiences. Students in the Intercultural Ministry & Missions Emphasis (IMME) live with host families within walking distance of the university. Most of the courses offered are taught by UCU professors, and many include both UCU and USP students. As a result a spectrum of Ungandan relationships gives USP students a firsthand perspective as they explore issues such as poverty, cultural expressions of Christianity and missions, and as they seek to reconcile the realities of East Africa with their Christian faith. Students also spend time in Rwanda and rural Uganda. In addition to the core experiential course, students will choose from an approved selection of courses from the UCU curriculum to earn up to 16 hours of credit.

India Studies Program

"Unity in Diversity" is the hallmark of the nation of India. The India Studies Program is structured to provide students with both immersion in a local community and broad exposure to a variety of peoples, places, and customs in India, including an extensive two-week travel portion of the program to provide students a close up look at India's diversity. Students will participate in two core courses designed to provide a broad overview of the historical, religious, geographical and economic landscape of India. Building on their basic understanding of India's past and contemporary realities, students will have opportunities to explore a variety of issues--poverty, social justice, rapid social change, religious pluralism--through the eyes and experience of Indian Christians. Rounding out the semester experience, students will also have the opportunity to take courses in their major area areas with Indian students and professors. At its heart the India Studies Program strives to encourage and equip students to effectively relate to India and its people in an informed, constructive and Christ-centered manner. ISP students earn up to 16 hours of credit.

Army ROTC

All university students in the Nashville area may participate in the Army ROTC program at Vanderbilt University. While Vanderbilt serves as the host university, students enrolled in other area colleges and universities are not charged additional tuition to take military science courses. Grades are transferred back to each university and added to the student's transcript. A Trevecca student who has successfully completed requirements for a Trevecca bachelor degree program and successfully completed the Army ROTC program at Vanderbilt will receive a commission in the Army, as well as the degree from Trevecca.

Students who are enrolled full time at Trevecca may take Army ROTC courses at Vanderbilt University, and if credit is received for the coursework, transfer the credit to Trevecca. A Trevecca student who has earned a minimum of 18 credit hours in military science courses will have his/her graduation requirement of a Trevecca minor waived.

Students who participate in the Army ROTC program from area schools receive all benefits, privileges, and compete for scholarships on the same basis as full-time students enrolled at Vanderbilt University. Upon graduation, there is an active duty and/or reserve duty obligation for scholarship students. There is no military commitment until entering the Advanced Program.

Army Officer Education (ARMY ROTC)

The Army Officer Education Program (ROTC) is a sequential and progressive academic program that provides pre-commission training for college-educated men and women who desire to serve as commissioned officers in the active Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard. As the Army's largest commissioning source, it fulfills a vital role in providing mature young men and women for leadership and management positions in an increasingly technological Army. Admission is open to both men and women who meet mental, moral, and physical qualifications.

Training goes beyond the typical college classroom and is designed to build individual confidence and self-discipline, instill values and ethics, and develop leadership skills. The course load consists of one course per semester. Each succeeding year will address course topics in greater depth as students receive feedback on their leadership style and assume positions of greater responsibility within the program. Graduates are commissioned as Second Lieutenants and will enter active duty with follow-on employment in the Army Reserves, National Guard, or active duty. Educational delays may be granted for graduates who desire to pursue advanced degrees prior to entry on active duty.

Scholarships. Students can earn merit scholarships in several ways. High school seniors and graduates compete for four-year scholarships that are determined by local competition among Vanderbilt applicants. Although determined locally, the application process is centrally managed. Scholarship students receive financial benefits that cover the cost of full tuition scholarships each year, an annual $1,200 book allowance, all uniforms, and a monthly tax-free stipend beginning at $300 for freshmen and increasing to $500 for seniors. All students enrolled in the Army ROTC program are provided textbooks and uniforms at no expense. Contracted non-scholarship students also receive the monthly stipend from $300 to $500 depending on the academic level. For more information, see the Web site at www.armyrotc.com.

Summer training. Students have the opportunity to attend several training events over the summer.

Leadership development and assessment course (LDAC) - This five-week leadership exercise at Fort Lewis, Washington, is a commissioning requirement. This is normally done between the junior and senior years. Travel, room, and board are provided free, and cadets are paid approximately $700.

Cultural Understanding and Language Program (CULP) Internships – Students are encouraged to spend a semester, special or summer session in academic studies abroad if feasible. Special incentives are available to further attract qualified students to these valuable programs.

Cadet Troop and Leadership Training Internships (CTLT) – CTLT Internships are leadership development opportunities for students who are placed with military organizations throughout the world to gain perspective and understanding or the role of the military officer.

Cadet Professional Field Training (CPFT) – Airborne, Air Assault, Mountain Warfare, Robin Sage (US Special Forces), Helicopter Flight Training, and Sapper.

Other training opportunities exist for qualified applicants who are interested.

Commissioning and career opportunities. A commission in the U.S. Army is a distinctive honor earned through hard work, demonstrated commitment, and a desire to serve the nation. Post-graduate military education, usually starting within six months of graduation and commissioning and continuing through the officer's service career, begins with the basic officer leadership course followed by officer basic course that qualify new lieutenants in their specific branch of service. Education delays are available for critical specialties requiring postgraduate civilian education such as law and medical degrees.

For more information, visit http://www.vanderbilt.edu/Army/ or telephone the Enrollment Officer 615-322-8551/8550.

Continuing Education

Continuing education courses are designed to meet the educational needs of nontraditional students. A limited number of non-credit educational activities are awarded Continuing Education Units. A CEU is defined as "ten contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction." CEU awards are offered occasionally by academic departments or programs and may be earned as class or individual units. For further information concerning a specific academic program, contact the appropriate academic department, program, or the Office of Academic Affairs.

Interdepartmental Studies

THOMAS L. MIDDENDORF, Associate Director of the Center for Leadership, Calling, and Service, Assistant Professor of Leadership Studies,2008—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1999; MA, Olivet Nazarene University, 2007; EdD, Olivet Nazarene University, 2009.

DONNA-JEANNE GRAY, Associate Director of Academic Services for the Center for Leadership, Calling, and Service, 1988—
BA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1982; MA, Middle Tennessee State University, 1986; EdD, Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005.

Interdepartmental Studies General Information

The Interdepartmental Studies unit provides course work to enhance the abilities and skills of students to successfully engage in the work needed to complete the requirements of their chosen field of study. Courses include non-college-credit developmental classes in English and math and college level courses to enhance study skills and career planning.

The Associate of Arts in General Studies is a two-year program designed for students who want a terminal two-year degree without a major concentration or students who begin in a major area of study and then choose to end their college program after two years of study.

Students interested in these courses or the AA degree may contact the Center for Leadership, Calling, and Service.

Developmental Education Courses

(not for credit toward graduation)

Interdepartmental Courses

INT 0900 Foundations in English Learning Strategies (3)

Emphasizes strategies to assist students in both writing and reading skills. It gives practice in the writing of paragraphs and focuses on an intensive review of grammar and punctuation. The course also analyzes the paragraph and other reading selections from the reader's perspective in order to increase students' reading skills. The course gives institutional credit but no credit toward graduation. Graded S, IP, U, F.

INT 0950 Elementary Algebra (3)

Prepares students for college-level mathematics. Material will encompass basic math skills and elementary algebra, depending on the needs of the students. Students with Math ACT scores of 17 and below will take both this course and Intermediate Algebra (INT 0960). The course gives institutional credit but no credit toward graduation. Fee charged. Graded S, IP, U, F.

INT 0960 Intermediate Algebra (3)

Prepares students for college-level mathematics or college algebra. Material will encompass rational expressions and functions, exponents and polynomials, graphs and linear functions, real numbers and linear equations, and radicals and quadratic equations. All students with Math ACT scores of 19 or below will be placed in intermediate algebra.  The course gives institutional credit but no credit toward graduation. Fee charged. Graded S, IP, U, F.

General Electives for College Credit

INT 1010 Study Skills (2)

Emphasizes intensive study and practice in time management, note-taking and test-taking focusing on different study techniques. This course may be required of students on academic probation for the first time and is required for students admitted on Academic Restriction. Graded on a regular letter grade basis.

INT 1050 Career Planning and Development (1)

Focuses on guiding students through the academic and career exploration and planning processes and provides the strategies and skills necessary for a lifetime of career-related decision making. Students will participate in a variety of self-discovery activities exploring personal interests, values, and abilities. With this information, students will utilize various exploration techniques to define and clarify educational and career plans. Graded on a regular letter grade basis.

INT 1100 Life Calling and Purpose (3)

Empowers students to make the leap from the high school setting to the college environment. Students will begin a journey of self-awareness where they can identify their individual gifts and talents while considering how God can use their uniqueness within their field of interest. Required of all first-time freshmen (those enrolling with less than 24 hours).

INT 1150 Engaging Academic Success (2)

Designed to teach students to become intentional learners; develop effective study skills; and implement organizational and time management strategies. Discussion topics include: competing priorities; social and emotional demands of college life; understanding grades, GPA, and university academic policies. Graded Pass/Fail. Specifically designed for and required of all students on Academic Probation.

INT 1155 Engaging Academic Success (0)

A repeat of INT 1150 required of students who are continued on probation after the first semester. Graded Pass/Fail.

General Studies AA

The Associate of Arts in General Studies is a two-year program designed for the student who does not desire to concentrate in one major field of study. The program provides the student with a general exposure to the major fields of knowledge with 39-40 hours of required courses and 20-21 hours elective courses selected with the guidance of an advisor. This degree is for students who complete their college work at this level and is not awarded to those who plan a four-year degree.

General Education Student Learning Outcomes for General Studies AA:

  1. Students will demonstrate competency in oral and written communication exhibiting an awareness of content, purpose, and audience while accurately using Standard English.
  2. Students will articulate the foundational themes of the Holy Bible as well as the intellectual strategies for further study of the scripture.
  3. Students will articulate the parameters of Wesleyan-Holiness tradition, doctrinal and moral convictions of the Church of the Nazarene and the connection with intellectual, emotional, spiritual, and physical life, individually and collectively.
  4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of global civilization, human behavior, and religion through historical, literary, and aesthetic records.
  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding and practice of various intellectual modes of thinking.
  6. Students will integrate the fundamental doctrinal/moral tenets of the Christian faith with the basic liberal arts and academic major, forming students for Christian leadership and service in the global community.
  7. Students will demonstrate an understanding of cultural diversity with a capacity to positively engage others.

Total General Education Required:

39 or 40 hours

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing and Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

 

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

(3)

 

(either one may be taken as one of the Social Science options below)

SOCIAL SCIENCE (choose two)

(6)

 

ECO

2000

Principles of Macroeconomics

(3)

 

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

 

COM

2010

Interpersonal Communications

(3)

 

ATH

3010

Introduction to Anthropology

(3)

 

HIS

2010

U.S. History Survey I

(3)

 

HIS

2020

U.S. History Survey II

(3)

 

POL

2020

American Political Institutions

(3)

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

SCI

1500

Life Science

(3)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1600

Physical Science

 

MAT

1040

Concepts of Math

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

or

 

HPE

2040

Personal and Community Health

(3)

Electives:

20 or 21 hours

Total

60 hours