Department of Science and Mathematics

ADMINISTRATORS

ALFRED B. CAWTHORNE, Chair, Department of Science and Mathematics

MARTHA BUCKNER, Director, Nursing Program

CATHY HENDON, Coordinator, Nursing Program

E. CHRISTIS FARRELL, Director, Medical Technology Program

Administrators of Medical Technology Internship at Vanderbilt

KATHERINE M. HOPPER, Program Director of Medical Technology

MICHAEL LAPOSATA, Lab Medical Director

FACULTY

RICKEY D. BADLEY, Professor of Chemistry, 2011—
BS, Southwestern Oklahoma State University, 1984; PhD, Oklahoma State University, 1989.

STEPHEN M. BLAKEMAN, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1993—
BS, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1977; MA, Indiana University, 1987.

ALFRED B. CAWTHORNE, III, Associate Professor of Physics, 2006—
BS, Eastern Nazarene College, 1992; PhD, University of Maryland, 1998.

STEPHANIE CAWTHORNE, Professor of Mathematics, 2006—
BS, Eastern Nazarene College, 1992; PhD, University of Maryland, 1998.

E. CHRISTIS FARRELL, Director of Medical Technology Program, Professor of Biology, 1995—
BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1961; MS, The Ohio State University, 1968; PhD, The Ohio State University, 1971.

MATTHEW HUDDLESTON, Assistant Professor of Physics, 2008—
BA, Greenville College, 1994; MSc, Rice University, 1999; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2003.

YANICE MENDEZ-FERNANDEZ, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2012—

BA, University of Puerto Rico, 1998; PhD, Mayo Graduate School, 2004.

ALISHA J. RUSSELL, Assistant Professor of Biology, 2009-—
BS, Baker University, 2003; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2010.

R. ALAN SMITH, Associate Professor of Biology, 2006—
BA, Cumberland College, 1991; MS, University of Tennessee, 1994; PhD, Vanderbilt University, 2003.

SAMUEL K. STUECKLE, Professor of Mathematics, 1996—
BS, Northwest Nazarene University, 1980; PhD, Clemson University, 1985.

Department of Science and Mathematics General Information

The following majors are offered by the Department of Science and Mathematics: Applied Physics, Biology, Biology Education, Chemistry, Chemistry Education, Financial Mathematics, General Science, Mathematics, Mathematical Biology, Mathematics Education, Nursing, Physics, and Physics Education. This department offers minors in Biology, Environmental Science, Chemistry, Physical Science, Physics, General Science, and Mathematics. The courses offered are designed to provide a database allowing the student to apply that knowledge in a technical profession, graduate school, or in the field of teaching.

The teaching majors are approved by the Tennessee Board of Education and are part of the unit accredited by NCATE.

Mission Statements and Student Learning Outcomes for Academic Majors in Science and Mathematics

Biology Major

Mission Statement

The biology major seeks to prepare graduates who have a broad-based understanding of biology, including experimental and analytical laboratory techniques, that will prepare them to succeed professionally and in graduate/professional programs.

Chemistry Major

Mission Statement

The chemistry major strives to develop graduates through a broad-based curriculum that forms an understanding of chemistry from historical, experimental, and theoretical perspectives. Graduates are prepared to assume roles as leaders in the chemical industry or to further their studies in graduate/professional programs.

Physics and Applied Physics Majors

Mission Statement

The physics and applied physics majors seek to prepare students with a foundational knowledge of analytical thinking, data collection and analysis, and experimental skills. This knowledge is coupled with acquiring understanding of the fundamental laws of the physical universe in a nurturing Christian environment. Development of the whole person for leadership and/or service roles is emphasized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Majors will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and principles in the major.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills in experimental and analytical techniques including health and safety precautions for laboratory procedures.
  3. Clearly communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in use of computers and related technology for applications in collecting, analyzing, and reporting data and in making presentations.
  5. Apply analytical and critical thinking to solving problems related to the major and to promote lifelong learning.
  6. Apply Christian principles to ethical and moral issues related to their major.
  7. Advance in their chosen professions and/or be admitted to and be successful in graduate/professional programs.

General Science Major

Mission Statement

The general science major seeks to prepare graduates who have a breadth of basic knowledge in biology, chemistry, and physics including laboratory techniques.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a General Science major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of concepts and principles in biology, chemistry, and physics according to the levels of courses completed in each subject area.
  2. Apply knowledge and skills in experimental and analytical techniques including health and safety precautions for laboratory procedures.
  3. Clearly communicate scientific information both orally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in use of computers and related technology for applications in collecting, analyzing, and reporting data and in making presentations.
  5. Apply analytical and critical thinking to solving problems related to at least two of the areas of biology, chemistry, and physics and to promote lifelong learning.
  6. Apply Christian principles to ethical and moral issues related to biology, chemistry, and/or physics.
  7. Advance in their chosen professions and/or be admitted to and be successful in graduate/professional programs.

Mathematics Major

Mission Statement

The mathematics major seeks to prepare graduates who are competent in reasoning and problem solving skills that will prepare them for success in technical professions and in graduate studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mathematics major will be able to:

  1. Understand and construct mathematical proofs.
  2. Solve significant problems using mathematical methods and appropriate technology.
  3. Clearly express mathematical ideas, both verbally and in writing.
  4. Demonstrate a comprehensive view of mathematics.

Financial Mathematics Major

Mission Statement

The Financial Mathematics major seeks to prepare graduates who are competent in reasoning and problem solving skills focused on business, finance and economics applications. This major will prepare them for success in technical business professions and in graduate studies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Financial Mathematics major will be able to:

  1. Understand and construct mathematical proofs.
  2. Solve significant business problems using mathematical methods and appropriate technology.
  3. Clearly express business, financial, and economics problems in mathematical terms.
  4. Demonstrate a comprehensive view of mathematics and its relationship to business and finance.

Mathematical Biology Interdisciplinary Major

Mission Statement

The complexities of the biological sciences make interdisciplinary involvement essential and the increasing use of mathematics in biology is inevitable as biology becomes more quantitative and as biology and biotechnology become more important in the coming decades. The Mathematical Biology major seeks to prepare graduates who are prepared to deal with problems arising from this new and rich area of interaction. This major will prepare them for success in professions in the biotechnology sector, either in academia or in the commercial world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mathematical Biology major will be able to:

  1. Understand and construct mathematical proofs.
  2. Solve significant biological problems using mathematical methods and appropriate technology.
  3. Develop and understand mathematical models in the biological sciences.

Mission statements and student learning outcomes for Biology Education, Chemistry Education, Mathematics Education, and Physics Education are in the Teacher Education Programs section of the Catalog.

Applied Physics BS

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science and Mathematics components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division physics courses. With prior approval, equivalent general education courses completed during the first year at Vanderbilt may be used to satisfy general education requirements in the 3-2 engineering program.

Major

36-37 hours

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

PHY

2100

Object-Oriented Design and Programming in Java I

(3)

PHY

3130

Circuits

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

 

PHY

2130

Statics

(3-4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

 

Physics elective (3000 level or above)

 

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

Option 1 Physics Concentration

PHY

4330

Special Projects in Physics

(1)

 

 

or

 

PHY

4340

Research Projects in Physics

 

 

 

or

 

PHY

4510

Career Internship in Physics

 

Choose two (2) of the following not chosen for major elective above:

(8)

PHY

3300

Intermediate Mechanics (4)

 

PHY

3200

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism (4)

 

PHY

4010

Thermodynamics (4)

 

PHY

4020

Modern Physics (4)

 

PHY

4400

Quantum Mechanics (4)

 

Option 2 Pre-Engineering Concentration

 

9 credits of Engineering courses at Vanderbilt University at a 200 level or above, or 9 credits of engineering courses at an equivalent level in an accredited engineering program

(9)

Required Support Courses:

19 hours

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

Additional Support Courses may be required to support the specific engineering discipline chosen in the 3-2 engineering program.

Mathematics Minor

18* hours

*15 of the 18 hours will be completed as part of the support course requirements.

Additional Minor and/or General Electives

18-20 hours

Total

120 hours*

*In the 3-2 Engineering Program, at least 99 hours must be completed before transfer to Vanderbilt University.

Applied Physics Major with Mathematics Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 2 Spring

 

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

or

 

PHL

3070

Ethics

 

 

 

Human Sciences Behavioral Choice

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 4

 

PHY

2130

Statics*

(3)

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

PHY

2550

Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering*

(3)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PHY

4010

Thermodynamics*

(4)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 6

 

PHY

2100

Object-Oriented Design and Programming in Java

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

Total 15-16

Senior Year (option 1)

Semester 7

 

PHY

3300

Intermediate Mechanics*

(4)

PHY

3130

Circuits

(4)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

PHY

4340

Research Projects in Physics

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 8

 

PHY

3200

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism*

(4)

PHY

4330

Special Projects in Physics

(3)

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

PHY

4400

Quantum Mechanics*

(4)

 

Total 15

3-2 Engineering Program

Total Credit Hours Semesters 1-6 (99 hours required for option 2) 103-104 hours

Total credit hours for major

130-131

*Courses offered every other year (PHY 2130, 2550, 3200, 3300, 4010, 4020 and 4400 should be substituted in alternate years)

Biology BS

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science and Mathematics components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division biology courses.

Major

37-38 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

BIO

2100

Principles of Cell Biology

(3) or (4)

 

 

or

 

BIO/
CHE

3520/
3520

Biochemistry II

 

BIO

2820

Microbiology

(4)

BIO

3040

Ecology

(4)

BIO

3720

Genetics

(4)

BIO

3730

Molecular Biology

(4)

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

Biology Electives

(9)

Required Support Courses:

31 hours

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

Chemistry Minor

 

Chemistry Courses

(20*)

 

To complete chemistry minor in addition to required chemistry courses

(4)

 

General Electives

(7)

*16 of the 20 hours will be completed as a part of the biology major requirements (support courses)

Minor Other than Chemistry

15 -20 hours

Total

120-122 hours

Biology Major with Chemistry Minor (Pre-Professional) Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

 

 

and

 

MAT

1310

Precalculus

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 2

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

 

or

 

MAT

1510

Calculus I

 

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice (if not taken during the first semester of the freshman year)

(1)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 17-18

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

BIO

2820

Microbiology

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry

(4)

PHY

2100

General Physics I

(4)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 4

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

BIO

3040

Ecology

(4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

Total 17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

BIO/
CHE

3510

Biochemistry I

(4)

BIO

3720

Genetics

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

or

 

PHL

3070

Ethics

 

 

Total 17

Semester 6

 

BIO/
CHE

3520

Biochemistry II

(4)

 

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

BIO

3730

Molecular Biology

(4)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

Total 17-18

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

 

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

Total 15-17

Semester 8

 

 

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

 

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

ALH

3060

Medical Terminology

(1)

PSY

2175

Abnormal Psychology

(3)

 

Total 13-15

Total credit hours for major

121-127

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Biology Education BS (7-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Programs section of the Catalog.

Chemistry BS

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science and Mathematics components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division chemistry courses.

Major

37 hours

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2530

Analytical Chemistry

(4)

CHE

3220

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

(4)

CHE

3510

Biochemistry I

(4)

 

 

or

 

CHE

3520

Biochemistry II

 

CHE

4010

Physical Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

4020

Physical Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

4335

Seminar in Chemistry

(1)

Required Support Courses:

27 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

Minor

15-20 hours

(Minor in Biology, Physics, or Math is desirable.)

Total

121-127 hours

Chemistry Major with Biology Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 2

 

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Science

(3)

SCI

2150

Introduction of Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 4

 

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

 

 

Biology elective

(3-4)

REL

2000

Biblical Faith

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

Total 17-18

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

CHE

2530

Analytical Chemistry*

(4)

BIO

 

Biology Elective

(3-4)

 

 

PHL elective

(3)

 

 

Language

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

CHE

3220

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry*

(4)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

Total 16

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

CHE

4010

Physical Chemistry I*

(4)

CHE/
BIO

3510

Biochemistry I*

(4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Behavioral Choice

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 16

Semester 8

 

CHE

4020

Physical Chemistry II*

(4)

CHE/
BIO

3520

Biochemistry II*

(4)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Behavioral choice

(3)

CHE

4335

Senior Seminar

(1)

 

Total 15

Total credit hours for major

130-132

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Chemistry Major with Physics Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 2 Spring

 

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

Total 17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

CHE

2530

Analytical Chemistry*

(4)

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

 

 

PHL elective

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

CHE

3220

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry*

(4)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

CHE

4010

Physical Chemistry I*

(4)

CHE/
BIO

3510

Biochemistry I*

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

 

Physics Elective

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

MAT/ PHY

2550

Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Behavioral Choice

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 8

 

CHE/
PHY

4020

Physical Chemistry II*

(4)

CHE/
BIO

3520

Biochemistry II*

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

 

Physics Elective

 

CHE

4335

Senior Seminar

(1)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

 

Total 18

Total credit hours for major

131-132

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Chemistry Education BS (7-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Programs section of the Catalog.

Physics BS

General Education

45 or 46 hours

The Laboratory Science and Mathematics components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division physics courses.

Major

34 hours

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY

3130

Circuits

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

 

PHY

3300

Intermediate Mechanics

(4)

PHY

3200

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

(4)

PHY

4010

Thermodynamics

(4)

PHY

4020

Modern Physics

(4)

PHY

4400

Quantum Mechanics

(4)

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

PHY

4330

Special Projects in Physics

(1)

 

 

or

 

PHY

4340

Research Projects in Physics

 

 

 

or

 

PHY

4510

Career Internship in Physics

 

Required Support Courses:

23 hours

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT/PHY

2550

Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering

(3)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

Mathematics Minor

(18*)

*15 of the 18 hours will be completed as part of the support course requirements.

Additional Minor and/or General Electives

15-20 hours

Total

121-126 hours

MAT 3020 Differential Equations (3) and MAT 3090 Linear and Matrix Algebra (3) are recommended support courses but not required.

Physics Major with Mathematics Minor Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 2 Spring

 

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

 

Total 14

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

PHY

2030

Digital Electronics

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

or

 

PHL

3070

Ethics

 

MAT/ PHY

2550

Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering

(3)

 

 

Human Sciences Behavioral Choice

(3)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PHY

4020

Modern Physics*

(4)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

PHY

4010

Thermodynamics*

(4)

PHY

4400

Quantum Mechanics*

(4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

Total 16-17

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

PHY

3300

Intermediate Mechanics*

(4)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

PHY

3200

Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism*

(4)

PHY

4330

Special Projects in Physics

(1)

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

(1)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

General Electives

(6)

 

 

 

 

 

Total 15

Total credit hours for major

123-124

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Physics Education BS (7-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

General Science BS

General Education

45 or 46 hours

The Laboratory Science, and Mathematics, components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses.

Major

33 hours

Biology

(8)

Chemistry

(8)

Physics

(8)

Science Electives
(must be at 3000/4000 level courses)

(8)

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

 

 

or

 

CHE

4335

Seminar in Chemistry

 

 

 

or

 

PHY

4335

Seminar in Physics

 

Required Support Courses:

10 - 11 hours

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1310

Precalculus (3)

(3 or 4)

 

 

or

 

MAT

1510

Calculus I (4)

 

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

Minor

15-20 hours

General Electives

10-17 hours

Total

120 hours

General Science Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

MAT

1055

College Algebra

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Elective

 

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2 Spring (Even years)

 

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

MAT

1310

Pre-Calculus

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Elective

 

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

 

 

Human Sciences Behavioral

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 18-19

Semester 4

 

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

or

 

PHL

3070

Ethics

 

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

PHY

1010

Basic College Physics I

(4)

 

 

Science Elective

(3-4)

 

 

Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

PHY

1020

Basic College Physics II

(4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

 

 

Science Elective

(3-4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 8

 

BIO/
CHE/
PHY

4335

Seminar in Biology/
Chemistry/Physics

(1)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

 

Science Elective

(3-4)

 

 

Selected Minor

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

 

Total 13-14

Total credit hours for major

125-129

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Science Minors

Biology Minor

20 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

 

 

Biology Electives

(12)

Chemistry Minor
(strongly advised for biology majors)

20 hours

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

 

 

Chemistry Electives

(4)

General Science Minor

20 hours

Biology

(4)

Chemistry

(4)

Physics

(4)

Science Electives

(8)

Environmental Science Minor

21-24 hours

Hours to be taken at Trevecca
Choose from:

13-14 hours

BIO

2900

Urban Restoration Ecology

(4)

 

BIO

3040

Ecology

(4)

 

SCI

2200

Physical Geology

(3)

 

SCI

2000

Introduction to Environmental Science

(3)

 

BIO

3800

Biological and Environmental Ethics

(3)

 

At Au Sable Institute and/or Gulf Coast Research Laboratory)

8-10 hours

Physical Science Minor

20 hours

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

 

 

Physical Science Electives

(4)

Physics Minor

18 hours

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY

 

Physics electives at 2000 level or more

(10)

Mathematical Biology Interdisciplinary BS

Since this is an interdisciplinary program, the student should have an advisor in both mathematics and biology. This major satisfies the requirement for both a major and a minor.

General Education

42 or 43 hours

The Laboratory Science and Mathematics components of the General Education curriculum are fulfilled by required major and support courses. Issues in Science is waived in lieu of upper division biology courses.

Major

59 hours

Mathematics Courses

27 hours

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics

(3)

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

MAT

3090

Linear Algebra

(3)

MAT

4030

Real Analysis

(3)

Mathematical Biology

9 hours

MBI

3500

Discrete Models in Mathematical Biology

(3)

MBI

3600

Continuous Models in Mathematical Biology

(3)

MBI

3700

Bioinformatics

(3)

Biology

23 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

BIO

2100

Principles of Cell Biology

(3)

BIO

3040

Ecology

(4)

BIO

3720

Genetics

(4)

BIO

3730

Molecular Biology

(4)

Required Support Courses:

16 hours

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

 

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

ITI

3500

Object-Oriented Programming in C++

(3)

 

 

or

 

ITI

3530

Introduction to C# Programming

 

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

 

 

or

 

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

 

General Electives

(3-4)

Total

120-122 hours

Mathematical Biology Four-Year Plan

For even years swap the courses with the same superscript.

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Technology for the Sciences

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2 Spring (Even years)

 

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

MAT

1400

Perspectives on Mathematics

(1)

 

 

or

 

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

 

BIO

2100

Principles of Cell Biology1

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

3000

Probability and Mathematical Statistics*

(3)

BIO

3720

Genetics

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 17

Semester 4

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations*

(3)

BIO

3730

Molecular Biology

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

Total 17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

MBI

3600

Continuous Models in Mathematical Biology*

(3)

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis*

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra*

(3)

MBI

3700

Bioinformatics

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

ECO

2000

Principles of Macroeconomics

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

Total 14

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

BIO

3040

Ecology

(4)

ITI

3500

Object-Oriented Programming in C++

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 8

 

MBI

3500

Discrete Models in Mathematical Biology*

(3)

BIO

4335

Seminar in Biology

(1)

 

 

or

 

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

 

 

Elective

(2)

 

Total 14

Total credit hours for major

125

*Courses offered every other year

Mathematics BS

General Education

49-50 hours

The Mathematics component of the General Education curriculum is fulfilled by a course required for this major.

Major

38 hours

Core

23 hours

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

Choose one of the following two options:

 

Pure Mathematics Concentration (Option 1)

15 hours

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis

(3)

MAT

4060

Modern Algebra

(3)

Choose three of the following:

(9)

 

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3)

 

MAT

3010

Discrete Methods (3)

 

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research (3)

 

MAT

4080

Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries (3)

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations (3)

 

MAT

4110

Topics in Mathematics (3)

Applied Mathematics Concentration (Option 2)

15 hours

Choose one of the following:

(3)

 

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis (3)

 

MAT

4060

Modern Algebra (3)

Choose four of the following:

(12)

 

MAT

2550

Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering (3)

 

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3)

 

MAT

3010

Discrete Methods (3)

 

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research (3)

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations (3)

 

MAT

4110

Topics in Mathematics (3)

 

MBI

3500

Discrete Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

 

MBI

3600

Continuous Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Minor

15-20 hours

Students choosing Option 2 are encouraged to minor in physics, chemistry, or economics/finance.

General Electives

12-18 hours

Total

120 hours

Mathematics Four-Year Plan

For even years swap the math classes in Years 3 and 4.

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

 

 

Minor class

(3-4)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

PEA

1500

Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 2 Spring *(Even years)

 

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

 

Total 17-18

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

 

 

or

 

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

 

 

or

 

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 16-17

Semester 4

 

 

 

Minor Course

(6-7)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

Total 15-16

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

MAT

3010

Discrete Methods*

(3)

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

ECO

2000

Principles of Macroeconomics

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

Total 15-16

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics*

(3)

MAT

4060

Modern Algebra*

(3)

 

 

Minor Course

(3-4)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 8

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations*

(3)

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research*

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

 

 

General Education or Elective

(3)

 

Total 12

Total credit hours for major

120-127

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Financial Mathematics BS

General Education

53-54 hours

MAT 1510 Calculus I will be taken to satisfy the mathematics requirement in the Foundations Tier and ECO 2000 Principles of Macroeconomics will be taken to satisfy the Institutional Choice in the Human Sciences Tier.

Major

53-55 hours

MAT

1400

Perspectives in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics

(3)

MAT

3020

Differential Equations

(3)

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research

(3)

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra

(3)

MAT

4030

Introduction to Real Analysis

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

MAT

4510

Career Internship in Mathematics

(1-3)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

ACT

2210

Principles of Accounting I

(3)

ECO

2010

Principles of Microeconomics

(3)

ECO

3260

Managerial Economics

(3)

BUS

3020

Statistics for Business and Economics I

(3)

BUS

3025

Statistics for Business and Economics II

(3)

BUS

3400

Investments

(3)

BUS

4030

Business Finance

(3)

General Electives

11-14 hours

Total

120 hours

Financial Mathematics Four-Year Plan

For even years swap the math classes in Years 3 and 4.

Freshman Year

Semester 1 Fall (Odd years)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

ACT

2210

Principles of Accounting I

(3)

ECO

2000

Principles of Macroeconomics

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 2 Spring (Even years)

 

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

MAT

1400

Perspectives on Mathematics

(1)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

ECO

2010

Principles of Microeconomics

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

MAT

3000

Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics*

(3)

BUS

3020

Statistics for Business and Economics I

(3)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

 

 

or

 

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

 

 

 

or

 

PHY

2110

General Physics I

 

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

 

Total 16

Semester 4

 

MAT

3050

Introduction to Operations Research*

(3)

BUS

3025

Statistics for Business and Economics II

(3)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

MAT

4030

Real Analysis*

(3)

BUS

3400

Investments

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

MAT

3090

Linear and Matrix Algebra*

(3)

BUS

4030

Business Finance

(3)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

MAT

4510

Career Internship in Mathematics

(3)

ECO

3260

Managerial Economics

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

MAT

3020

Differential Equations*

(3)

MAT

4335

Seminar in Mathematics

(1)

 

 

General Education or Electives

(11)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total 15

Total credit hours for major

120

*Courses offered every other year (taken in either junior or senior year)

Mathematics Education BS (K-12 Licensure)

See Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog for description.

Mathematics Minor

The Mathematics component of the General Education curriculum is fulfilled by courses required for this minor.

Minor in Mathematics

18 hours

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

 

 

Math electives 2500 level and above

(10)

Pre-Professional Programs

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental/Pre-Veterinary/Pre-Physician Assistant/Pre-Pharmacy

Students typically major in either Biology or Chemistry with a minor in the other.

One year of General Physics is required. Individual counseling is given to each student as needed. Students are responsible for obtaining specific course requirements for the medical, dental, veterinary, physician assistant or pharmacy programs to which they are planning to apply.

Pre-Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy is a health care profession whose practitioners work as members of a multidisciplinary group of health personnel to help people overcome the effects of disease and injury and to prevent potential problems. Physical therapists treat their patients in a variety of settings such as private offices, nursing homes, home health agencies, public and private schools, academic institutions, and hospices. Physical therapists also work as educators, researchers, and consultants in a wide variety of organizations.

Students seeking admission to the field of physical therapy through a program in the Department of Science and Mathematics will major in Biology or Chemistry and must obtain a list of pre-requisites from their graduate physical therapy program choice to fulfill during the student's bachelor degree program.

Trevecca Nazarene University/Vanderbilt University Pre-Engineering —Engineering Transfer Agreement

Students who wish to combine study in a pre-engineering curriculum with further study in an engineering discipline may do so under a transfer agreement between Trevecca Nazarene University and Vanderbilt University. Under this agreement, a student will spend the first three years of his or her college career at Trevecca Nazarene University taking the pre-engineering curriculum, followed by two years at Vanderbilt University studying in one of their engineering programs. The available engineering programs are Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. A student who completes this five-year course of study will have had the experience of dividing an academic career between the pre-engineering environment of a Christian liberal arts university and the engineering climate in a professional school.

During the first three years in the student's program, at least 99 hours of coursework in the Applied Physics major with required support courses will be completed. After successful completion of the pre-engineering requirements with a 3.0 or higher GPA, and upon recommendation by the faculty at Trevecca Nazarene University, the student will be qualified to transfer to Vanderbilt University for the completion of an engineering degree. After successful completion of one academic year of prescribed study in an engineering discipline at Vanderbilt, Trevecca will accept in transfer 09 hours of engineering coursework as electives for the 58 hours required in the major (major and required science and math supporting courses) and a total of 21 hours to be applied toward Trevecca's 120-hour graduation requirement. If the student subsequently continues with his/her study at Vanderbilt, and successfully meets all prescribed completion requirements for a Vanderbilt University engineering degree major, the student will be awarded the appropriate credential.

Pre-Engineering for Students Planning to Transfer to a University other than Vanderbilt

First Year Required

33 hours

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1510

Calculus I

(4)

MAT

1520

Calculus II

(4)

PHY

2110

General Physics I

(4)

PHY

2120

General Physics II

(4)

PHY

2100

Object-Oriented Design and Programming in Java I

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

 

*Electives

(2)

Second Year Required

31 hours

MAT

2510

Calculus III

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

MAT

2600

Introduction to Abstract Mathematics

(3)

 

 

*Electives

(13)

Total

64 hours

*Students should choose electives according to requirements of the institution to which they plan to transfer for completion of their engineering degree. Usually this choice will mean carefully selecting courses from a variety of areas—e.g. social sciences, humanities, fine arts, etc.—to meet general education requirements. Each student should bring a copy of the institution's catalog to be used with the Trevecca advisor during registration counseling.

Medical Technology Program BS

The Medical Technology Program is being discontinued. No applicants are being accepted. Students currently in the program have been provided with completion plans.

The Medical Technology Program is a four-year course of study which leads to a B.S. Degree in Medical Technology. The student may become eligible for the B.S. degree and National Certification as a registered Medical Technologist through this program by: 1) successfully completing the three-year curriculum on campus, 2) successfully completing a twelve-month internship program at the affiliated school of Medical Technology: Vanderbilt and 3) qualifying for the National Registry.

The medical technologist performs both routine and highly sophisticated clinical laboratory procedures in the areas of microbiology, hematology, urinalysis, chemistry, serology, and blood banking. He/she is qualified to supervise technicians and laboratory aides and conduct in-service training of medical personnel.

Internship training programs are accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation and the American Medical Association upon recommendation by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (www.NAACLS.org).

Mission Statement

The Medical Technology program seeks to prepare students for a career of service, education and leadership.

Medical Technologist Student Learning Outcomes

Students graduating from the three preclinical years at Trevecca will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate responsibility and accountability for accurate test results and repeatable lab procedures.
  2. Show a desire for continual learning and establish patterns for future growth.
  3. Demonstrate proficiency in laboratory procedures in chemistry, microbiology, and hematology.
  4. Logically interpret data in understanding the facts, principles and techniques of clinical laboratory medicine.
  5. Show an acceptable pattern of behavior and growth during their senior clinical year.

Admission

Any student may enroll in the pre-medical technology program. However, enrollment in this phase of the program does not assure admission to the senior-internship phase of the program. Acceptance into the senior year of training is very competitive, and student selection is accomplished by medical staff at an affiliate hospital.

Students must make application for admission directly to an affiliated hospital medical technology program. This is usually done the fall semester of their junior or senior year. Only those candidates selected for admission will be able to continue in the program. Those not selected may reapply at a later date.

Prerequisites required and/or recommended are General Biology, Anatomy and Physiology, Chemistry, Math, Microbiology and Immunology. Students must complete all University general education requirements for the degree, as shown. Transfer credits from other approved hospital based Medical Technology programs will be accepted. Tuition will be paid to TNU at the standard rate.

Students accepted into the affiliate training program will pay their senior year tuition to that institution. Appropriate student fees will be paid to Trevecca.

Academic Requirements for the Professional Phase of the Medical Technology Program

All laboratory science courses must be passed with a minimum of a C grade. A student must repeat any laboratory science course in which he/she received below a C while at Trevecca.

Maintenance of GPA of 2.5 in the pre-professional phase of the program is required for advancement to the senior year.

Students entering their senior year of the professional program will be under the jurisdiction of the administrator and faculty of that institution. Students desiring to apply for admission to non-Trevecca affiliated training programs must work through the Director of the Medical Technology Program, Trevecca Nazarene University.

Students not admitted to the professional Medical Technology curriculum will be required to complete all general education requirements for graduation with other majors.

Medical Technology Program of Study

General Education

45-46 hours

Core Requirements

54 hours

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

CHE

1040

General Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

1050

General Chemistry II

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II*

(4)

BIO

2820

Microbiology

(4)

BIO

3720

Genetics

(4)

BIO

3620

Immunology

(3)

BIO

2010

Anatomy and Physiology I

(4)

BIO

2020

Anatomy and Physiology II

(4)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

MAT

1055

College Algebra

(3)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

ALH

3060

Medical Terminology

(1)

*Biochemistry (Bio 3510) may be substituted for one (1) semester of organic chemistry.

The following courses are recommended (not required) as electives:

PSY

2060

Behavioral Science Statistics

(3)

BIO

3010

Histology

(3)

CHE

3510

Biochemistry I

(4)

Senior Year:

36 hours

Students upon acceptance will transfer to the affiliated school of Medical Technology. The three-semester goal will contain a minimum of 36 semester hours.

Curriculum includes:

Clinical Chemistry

Microbiology

Immunohematology

Immuno/Serology

Hematology/Coagulation

Parasitology

Clinical Microscopy

Total credit hours for Medical Technology

135-136

Medical Technology Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

BIO

1510

General Biology I

(4)

CHE

1010

Principles of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry

(4)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 16

Semester 2

 

BIO

1520

General Biology II

(4)

CHE

1020

Principles of Organic and Biochemistry

(4)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

SCI

2150

Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

 

Total 17

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

BIO

2010

Anatomy and Physiology I

(4)

BIO

2820

Microbiology

(4)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

or

 

PHL

3070

Ethics

 

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

MAT

1055

College Algebra

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 4

 

BIO

2020

Anatomy and Physiology II

(4)

BIO

3620

Immunology

(3)

SCI

1050

Science Philosophy and Practice

(1)

 

 

Human Sciences Tier 1

(3)

MAT

1350

Statistical Analysis for the Sciences

(3)

 

 

Behavioral Choice

(3)

Total 17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

BIO

3720

Genetics

(4)

CHE

2010

Organic Chemistry I

(4)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Intercultural Literacy

(2-3)

 

Total 16-17

Semester 6

 

ALH

3060

Medical Terminology

(1)

 

 

World Aesthetics Option

(3)

CHE

2020

Organic Chemistry II

(4)

 

 

or

 

CHE

3510

Biochemistry

 

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

Total 16

Senior Year Hospital Based

Example

Semester 7

 

 

 

Clinical Chemistry

(3)

 

 

Microbiology

(3)

 

 

Immunohematology

(3)

 

 

Immuno/Serology

(1)

 

 

Hematology/Coagulation

(3)

 

 

Parasitology

(1)

 

 

Clinical Microscopy

(1)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

 

 

Chemistry Rotation

(3)

 

 

Seminar 1

(4)

 

 

Microbiology Rotation

(3)

 

 

Seminar 2

(3)

 

 

Immunology Rotation

(3)

 

 

Seminar 3

(2)

 

 

Hematology Rotation

(3)

 

Total 21

Total credit hours for Medical Technology

135-136

NURSING

Nursing Program - BSN

Trevecca Nazarene University is a member of the Partners in Nursing Consortium located on the campus of Belmont University in Nashville. Students in the Partners Program enroll at Trevecca Nazarene University where they complete general education and pre-nursing courses, participate in Belmont's Nursing Curriculum, and graduate from Trevecca Nazarene University with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree.

Mission Statement

The purpose of the Partners in Nursing Consortium is to prepare professional nurses for practice and service in a variety of health care settings. The student's education in the liberal arts, sciences, and nursing will enable the graduate to contribute to improving the quality of life for self, clients, and community. Students completing the program of studies are prepared to continue life-long learning, including graduate studies.

The goals of the Partners in Nursing Consortium are to:

Student Learning Outcomes

Successful completion of the objectives/competencies of the Trevecca Nazarene University undergraduate program in nursing requires the students to:

  1. Incorporate knowledge from the arts, humanities, natural, and social sciences in nursing practice.
  2. Demonstrate competency in applying problem-solving methods and a professional ethic of relationship-centered care in the nursing management of wellness and disease states across the lifespan.
  3. Utilize effective communication and information technology to enhance nursing practice.
  4. Incorporate multiple determinants of health in providing nursing care related to health promotion, illness prevention, health restoration, and rehabilitation.
  5. Provide culturally sensitive health care for diverse populations in a variety of health care settings.
  6. Demonstrate ability to provide relationship-centered care while providing stewardship of human and material resources.
  7. Provide professional nursing care management of wellness and disease states across practice environments.
  8. Collaborate with members of the interdisciplinary health care team to improve the delivery of health care to individuals, families, groups, and communities.
  9. Critique and use nursing research findings for applicability to nursing practice
  10. Use leadership and management skills to improve health care outcomes of individuals and populations in a variety of settings.
  11. Demonstrate evidence of a commitment to lifelong learning in professional practice and personal development.

Admission to the Nursing Program

Admission to the University does not constitute admission to the Nursing Program. Program admission is competitive and is limited to 16-24 students entering the program in the fall semester of each academic year. Application for admission to the program should be submitted during the student's first year of enrollment at Trevecca. After beginning the program, students will proceed through the established program of study as full-time students in a cohort group.

Freshmen must complete two (2) semesters, and transfers must complete one (1) semester as a full-time student at Trevecca to be eligible for entry into the University's Nursing Program, including completion of all courses required in the program's program of study for the "freshman year." Students accepted into the nursing program must have a valid social security number by their sophomore year.

Applicants for the nursing program must have an ACT of 22 and maintain a GPA of 2.75 during the first two semesters of the program of study. Entry into the program will be contingent upon a GPA of 2.75 at the end of the second semester.

  1. Formal application submitted to the program selection committee during the second semester of the program of study.
  2. Interview with the selection committee.
  3. Completion of all requirements for the nursing courses offered through the Partners in Nursing Consortium at Belmont University (immunizations, criminal background check, etc.).

Note: Persons who have been convicted of a crime, other than a minor traffic violation, can be ineligible for registered nurse licensure in the state of Tennessee even though they successfully complete the program.

Progression Requirements

  1. In order to continue in the Nursing Program, the student must be registered as a full-time student each semester at Trevecca. Nursing courses taken through the Partners in Nursing Consortium at Belmont University must be taken in the sequence as outlined in the program of study.*
  2. In addition to meeting the general university requirements, nursing students must achieve a minimum grade of "C" (2.0) in each required support course. Once admitted, the student must maintain a "C" (2.0) average each semester in order to continue in the nursing program.
  3. If a student earns less than the minimum grade of "C" (2.0) in any required support course, progression is not possible until the support course is successfully completed with a grade of "C" (2.0) or better.
  4. Only non-nursing support courses may be repeated once to achieve the minimum grade of "C". Repeated coursework must be taken at Trevecca Nazarene University.
  5. A student who fails one nursing course with a grade of D or F may repeat the failed course the following semester. A student may not enroll in additional nursing courses while repeating the failed course.
  6. A student who fails either one nursing course twice or two nursing courses with a grade of D or F will be dismissed from the nursing program.
  7. Students who are dismissed from the nursing program may choose to reapply and must initiate the reapplication process by notifying Belmont University School of Nursing in writing prior to December 31, May 31, or August15 depending on the semester in which they wish to reenroll. The student will then be notified of the time and date of the Readmission Committee (RAC) meeting and will be asked to provide a written document outlining their desire for readmission and their plan for academic success in future courses.
  8. All requirements for an "I" in prerequisite and/or nursing courses must be completed before a student can progress to the next semester.
  9. Any nursing major who demonstrates behavior inconsistent with the Code of Conduct in the Trevecca Student Handbook, the Belmont Student Handbook, or professional nursing is subject to immediate dismissal from the nursing program.
  10. Completion of all progression requirements for the Partners in Nursing Consortium at Belmont University.

    *The financial arrangements between Trevecca and the Belmont University for students enrolled in the Partners in Nursing Consortium are only for nursing courses listed in the Trevecca Nursing Program course of study and included in the Trevecca University Catalog.

Graduation Requirements

In addition to meeting the general University requirements for graduation, students must complete specific courses and clinicals in the nursing program of study and must pass a comprehensive examination in nursing during their last semester of the nursing curriculum.

Graduation requirements for the student in Trevecca Nazarene University's BSN program will be completion of 67 hours in the general and liberal arts curriculum requirements at Trevecca and 64 hours in the nursing major at Belmont University for a total of 131 semester hours.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Undergraduate Program of Study, 2012 – 2013

Freshman Year

Semester 1

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

BIO

1300

Principles of Biology

(4)

PSY

2010

General Psychology

(3)

PEA

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

Total 18

Semester 2

 

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

BIO

2010

Anatomy and Physiology I

(4)

SWK

1200

Introduction to Social Work

(3)

PSY

2175

Human Growth and Development

(3)

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

 

BIO

2020

Anatomy and Physiology II

(4)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

or

 

PHL

3070

Ethics

 

MAT

1055

College Algebra

(3)

NUR

2040

Health Assessment

(3)

NUR

2100

Nutrition for Healthcare

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 4

 

NUR

2410

Introduction to Nursing

(5)

NUR

2240

Pathophysiology

(3)

PSY

4150

Abnormal Psychology

(3)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

Choice from Intercultural Literacy in General Education

(2-3)

Total 17

Junior Year

Semester 5

 

NUR

3000

Professional Nursing II

(2)

NUR

3140

Pharmacology

(3)

NUR

3210

Adult Health Nursing I

(5)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

NUR

3410

Mental Health Nursing Concepts

(5)

NUR

3850

Scientific Inquiry

(3)

NUR

4500

Family Nursing: The Aging Adult

(2)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II

 

MUS

1500

Fine Arts

(3)

Total 16

Senior Year

Semester 7

 

NUR

4210

Family Nursing: Childbearing

(5)

NUR

4310

Family Nursing: Infant to Adolescent

(5)

NUR

4510

Community Health Nursing

(5)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

Total 18

Semester 8

 

NUR

4410

Adult Health Nursing II

(5)

NUR

4610

Leadership and Management

(5)

NUR

4710

Senior Practicum

(2)

NUR

4015

Senior Nursing Capstone

(3)

 

Total 15

Credits for non- nursing courses:

67

Credits for nursing courses:

64

Total credit hours for BSN

131

Pre-Nursing for Other Universities

Students seeking admission to nursing programs at other universities must obtain a list of prerequisites from the nursing program to which he or she intends to make application.

Science and Math Courses

BIOLOGY

BIO 1510 or BIO 1300 is a prerequisite to higher numbered biology courses except where noted.

BIO 1300—Principles of Biology (4)

An introduction to the biological sciences with a particular emphasis placed on concepts relevant to the health sciences. Biomolecules, cell structure and function, metabolism, cellular basis of reproduction, genetics, microbiology, animal morphology, and animal tissues and organ systems will be studied in detail. An introduction to evolution and ecology will also be included. Biology-related social and ethical issues encountered in the health professions will also be discussed. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 1510—General Biology I (4)

An introduction to fundamental concepts in the biological sciences including the organization of living matter, cellular structure and function, food production by photosynthesis, energy harvest, mechanisms of cellular reproduction, genetics, and evolution. Discussions of current scientific issues will also be included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 1520—General Biology II (4)

A study of diverse structures and functions observed in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, with emphasis placed on plants and vertebrates. The study of the Kingdom Plantae will include investigation of plant life cycles and reproductive strategies. Topics including respiration, digestion, and reproduction will be introduced in the study of vertebrate animals. An introduction to ecology and the impact of humans on a variety of organisms will also be included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 2010—Anatomy-Physiology I (4)

A study that includes the anatomy of the body as a whole. Emphasis will be on anatomical structures and organizational relationships of the organs and systems of the body. General physiology of each system and the major influence systems have on one another is emphasized. Laboratory studies include dissection of the cat and study of various skeletons, models, and charts. Prerequisite: BIO 1510. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 2020—Anatomy-Physiology II (4)

Designed to introduce the anatomy and physiology of multiple subsystems including the endocrine, vascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. The focus will be on developing a working knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of these subsystems that can then be applied to clinical case studies and laboratory experiments. A major objective of this course is to develop critical thinking skills that are essential for students entering various medical careers where they will serve Christ by serving others. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 2010 or equivalent. Fee charged.

BIO 2100—Principles of Cell Biology (3)

A survey of cellular structure and function. Topics will include energy conversions, cell replication, vesicular formation and transport, membrane structure and function, cell motility, and cell communication. Lecture. Prerequisite: BIO 1510 and BIO 1520. (Fall, odd numbered years).

BIO 2700—Nutrition (3)

A study of how chemical principles and biochemical pathways create certain nutritional requirements for humans in various states of health and disease. Emphasis will be given to the needs of pregnancy, infancy, adolescence, sports conditioning, maturity, and nutritional therapy in some disease states. The possible benefits of proper nutritional practices for our culture, wellness programs, and managed care will be discussed. The world-wide impact of hunger and disease and our responsibility for relief will be pursued. The laboratory will include various measurements and profiling of nutritional status on the individual students. CHE 1010 or CHE 1040 recommended. Lecture and lab. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged.

BIO 2820—Microbiology (4)

A survey of microscopic organisms with emphasis on bacteria and fungi. Classification, morphology, cultivation, and identification will be studied in both lecture and lab. The role of these organisms in the ecosystem, industry, and disease will also be discussed. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 1510. Fee charged.

BIO 2900—Urban Restoration Ecology (4)

The principles of restoration ecology and conservation biology are applied to a stressed urban neighborhood. The interdependent human relations of place, land, and biodiversity are recognized so that degraded ecologic resources may be improved in a sustainable manner. Organic permaculture techniques which are not seasonal will be selected for applicability to the stressed neighborhood. Restoration techniques that have worked well for the United Nations Environmental Project, World Bank and other NGO's will be examined for applicability, implemented, and results measured. Restoration guidelines of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will be followed to improve knowledge of these agencies and provide basis for further work and support. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 3010—Histology (3)

A study of mammalian tissue and microscopic identification of cells, tissues and organs. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 1510-20 or equivalent. Lecture and lab. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged.

BIO 3040—Ecology (4)

A course that promotes the understanding of ecosystems as a whole and the influence of humans as top predator to either balance and preserve or disrupt and destroy these systems. The study will include interactions of ecosystem constituents, both community and population, and their contribution or detriment to the system. Emphasis will be placed on the use of biodegradable materials in all aspects of our life cycle and analysis of energy and resource flow that is more sympathetic with natural systems. Aquatic, terrestrial, and urban habitats will be studied in laboratory and field trips always with a focus on some measurable significant improvement within each semester. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 3400—Continuous Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Models for biological processes based on ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics selected from models of population growth, predator-prey dynamics, biological oscillators, reaction-diffusion systems, pattern formation, neuronal and blood flow physiology, neural networks, and biomechanics. Prerequisite: MAT 3020, BIO 1520. Fall, odd numbered years. Cross listed as MBI 3600 and MAT 3600.

BIO 3500—Discrete Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Models for biological processes based on discrete mathematics (graphs, combinatorics), probabilistic and optimization methods, Markov chains and Markov fields, Monte-Carlo simulation, maximum-likelihood estimation, entropy, and information. Applications selected from epidemiology, inheritance and genetic drift, phylogenetics, combinatorics and sequence alignment of nucleic acids, energy optimization in protein structure prediction, and topology of biological molecules. Prerequisites: MAT 1520, MAT 3000, BIO 1520. Offered alternate years. Cross listed as MBI 3500 and MAT 3500.

BIO 3510—Biochemistry I (4)

Designed to introduce the chemistry underlying life. Topics of study will include the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; enzyme mechanics; and the kinetics and regulation of biological reactions. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: CHE 2010 or equivalent. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 3510.

BIO 3520—Biochemistry II (4)

A study of metabolic pathways and their regulation; nucleic acid structure, function and processing; regulation of gene expression; and current technologies used to study and combat diseases resulting from deficiencies in normal biochemical processes. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 3510/CHE 3510. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 3520.

BIO 3620—Immunology (3)

A study of the human immune system. The structure, physiology, and basic immunity principles will be discussed. Modern research and theories will be incorporated into the lecture. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 2820 (2010, and 2020 strongly recommended). (Spring, even numbered years.) Fee charged.

BIO 3730—Molecular Biology (4)

Emphasizes Molecular genetics. Topics include DNA structure, replication, and variation; expression and regulation of genetic information; recombinant DNA technology; and applications and ethics of biotechnology. Selected techniques in molecular genetics are included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 3720—Genetics (4)

Emphasizes Mendelian (classical) genetics. Additional topics include chromosome mapping in eukaryotes, chromosomal mutations, extranuclear inheritance, quantitative genetics, and population genetics. Genetic principles are applied to selected human traits as well as those of other organisms. Several genetic disorders of humans are considered. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

BIO 3750—Bioinformatics (3)

Introduces the scientist to Bioinformatics, which uses computer databases to store, retrieve and assist in understanding biological information. Genome-scale sequencing projects have led to an explosion of genetic sequences available for automated analysis. These gene sequences are the codes, which direct the production of proteins that in turn regulate all life processes. The student will be shown how these sequences can lead to a much fuller understanding of many biological processes allowing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to determine for example new drug targets or to predict if particular drugs are applicable to all patients. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts behind Bioinformatics and Computational Biology tools. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of the most commonly used online tools and resources. Prerequisites: MAT 3020, BIO 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years.) Cross listed as MBI 3700 and MAT 3700.

BIO 3800—Biological and Environmental Ethics (3)

Investigates the dilemmas of dangerous knowledge and technology in both environmental and medical activities including transplantation, stem cell research, reproductive technology, fetal tissue research, human gene manipulation, genetically modified crops, release of bioengineered organisms into natural ecosystems, ethics of environmental activism and religious roots of ethical values. The values of individual autonomy vs. human interdependence and mutual responsibility will be emphasized. The course will use a seminar format in which topics are presented by student teams who both develop positions for debate and discuss as panels. Lecture.

BIO 4000—Cancer Biology (3)

Introduces students to cancer biology fundamentals. Topics include cell proliferation, cell death, the process of metastasis and tumor progression, oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and cancer therapeutics. This class will also explore the latest scientific and clinical research through readings and presentations. Prerequisites: Biology I, BIO 1510; Biology II, BIO 1520; and Cell Biology, BIO 2100. (Spring, odd numbered years.)

BIO 4110—Topics in Biology (1-3)

In-depth coverage of one topic in the biological sciences with regard to the interest of the instructor and students. Possible topics include botany, zoology, seminal papers in biology, mathematics of biology, biotechnology, and instrumental methods and analysis. Permission of instructor required. May be repeated for credit. Offered as needed.

BIO 4330—Special Projects in Biology (1-3)

Open to biology majors and minors with advanced standing. Individual study in a chosen field under the supervision of the faculty member in that area of biology. Prerequisite: BIO 1510-1520 plus the advanced course in the area of study. Non-majors may take course by special permission.

BIO 4335—Seminar in Biology (1)

Includes project and papers presented and reported to the science faculty and science majors. To be taken during senior year.

BIO 4340—Research Projects in Biology (1-3)

Limited to biology majors and minors. Individual or small group research in selected field. Research is under supervision of a faculty member in biology. Prerequisite: beginning courses in major/minor, plus courses pertinent to area of research.

BIO 4510—Career Internship in Biology (1-3)

Work in off-campus facility under faculty supervision. Limited to juniors and seniors. Supervision coordinated with Office of Career Services. Maximum 6 hours. Graded S/U.

GULF COAST RESEARCH LABORATORY––MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY COURSES

Trevecca has an affiliation with the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) in Ocean Springs, Mississippi, which is the Department of Coastal Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi. The following courses may be taken during the summer at GCRL and the credits transferred to Trevecca from the University of Southern Mississippi. These courses can then be used to fulfill the 9-hour biology elective requirements of a biology major or a biology minor. The courses listed below are offered each summer. Consult the Coast Research Laboratory summer catalog at www.usm.edu/gcrl for a complete schedule of courses and additional information. Students should process the application for transient work through Trevecca's Records Office prior to the summer term.

May 14-25

Barrier Island Ecology (3)

Coastal Herpetology (3)

Coastal Ornithology (3)

Dolphin and Whale Behavior (3)

Environmental Photography (3)

Marine Toxicology (3)

May 29-June 26

Marine Aquaculture (6)

Marine Biology (5)

Marine Ecology (5)

Marine Invertebrate Zoology (6)

Parasites of Marine Animals (6)

June 27-July 27

Aquatic Ecosystems (5)

Marine Biology (5)

Marine Ichthyology (6)

Marine Mammals (5)

Oceanography (5)

Shark Biology (5)

AU SABLE INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Trevecca is a participating university with Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies. Through this affiliation students may enroll in courses at the Institute, and the credits will be transferred to Trevecca. Sustainable global development is emphasized in all courses. Biology courses can fulfill biology electives for the biology major and for the biology minor. Twelve hours from Au Sable are required for the environmental science minor.

Au Sable offers courses in the Great Lakes and the Florida Everglades. The courses listed below are typically offered during January, May, Summer I, and Summer II sessions. Consult the Au Sable Institute catalog at www.AuSable.org for a complete schedule of courses and additional information.

JANUARY SESSION--INDIA

Ecology of Indian Tropics Biol 427 (4 hrs.)

MAY SESSION -- GREAT LAKES

Field Natural History Biol 361 (4 hrs.)

Ornithology: Eastern Birds 305 (4 hrs.)

MAY SESSION -- COSTA RICA

Tropical Agriculture and Missions Biol/Agric/Geog 343 (4 hrs.)

SUMMER SESSION I -- GREAT LAKES

Animal Ecology Biol 321 (4 hrs.)

Aquatic Biology Biol 322 (4 hrs.)

Conservation Biology Biol/Geog 471 (4 hrs.)

Field Botany Biol 311 (4 hrs.)

Land Resources Biol/Geol/Geog 301 (4 hrs.)

Molecular Tools for Field Biologist Biol 360 (4 hrs)

Research Methods I Biol/EnvSt/Geol/Geog 490 (4 hrs)

SUMMER SESSION II -- GREAT LAKES

Environmental Chemistry Chem 332 (4 hrs.)

Insect Biology and Ecology Biol 312 (4 hrs.)

Limnology (Water Resources) Biol 302 (4 hrs.)

Restoration Ecology Biol 482 (4 hrs.)

Watershed Stewardship Biol/Geog 355 (4 hrs.)

Research Methods II Biol/Chem/EnvSt/Geog 491 (1 hr.)

Wildlife Ecology Biol 345 (4 hrs.)

AU SABLE - PACIFIC RIM

Alpine Ecology Biol 478 (4 hrs.)

Ecological Agriculture Biol 303 (4 hrs)

Environmental Health: An Ecological Perspective Biol 452 (4 hrs.)

International Development and Environmental Sustainability Biol/Geog 304 ( 4 hrs.)

Marine Biology Biol 318 (4 hrs)

Marine Mammals Biol 359 (4 hrs.)

CHEMISTRY

Cognitive skills are emphasized in the chemistry courses, and some psychomotor skills are learned in the laboratory portions of each course.

CHE 1010—Principles of Inorganic and Organic Chemistry (4)

Includes the basic principles of inorganic chemistry and an introduction to organic chemistry. Designed primarily for pre-nursing students. May also be taken for General Education credit. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 1020—Principles of Organic and Biochemistry (4)

Continuation of organic chemistry CHE 1010 and study of biochemical compounds and their reactions. Prerequisite: CHE1010. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 1040-1050—General Chemistry I, II (4), (4)

A sequence for students planning further work in chemistry. Topics discussed include chemical notation, atomic structures, periodic relationships, bonding, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases, salts, redox reactions, electrochemistry, , and qualitative analysis. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 2010-2020—Organic Chemistry I, II (4), (4)

An introduction to the study of the compounds of carbon-their classification, nomenclature, preparation, and reactions. Prerequisite: one year of college chemistry. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

CHE 2300—Principles of Analytic Chemistry (3)

A study of volumetric, gravimetric and instrumental methods of analysis. Lecture only. (Offered alternate years.)

CHE 2530—Analytical Chemistry (4)

A study of volumetric, gravimetric, and instrumental methods of analysis. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years). Fee charged.

CHE 3210—Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry (2)

A laboratory course open to advanced students in chemistry. Inorganic compounds are prepared in pure conditions. Prerequisite: CHE 1050 or equivalent. 6 hours Laboratory. Offered on demand. Fee charged.

CHE 3220—Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (4)

Descriptive chemistry of the metallic and nonmetallic elements, coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and industrial inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1050 or equivalent. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years). Fee charged.

CHE 3510—Biochemistry I (4)

Designed to introduce the chemistry underlying life. Topics of study will include the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates and lipids; enzyme mechanics; and the kinetics and regulation of biological reactions. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: CHE 2010 or equivalent. (Fall, odd numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as BIO 3510.

CHE 3520—Biochemistry II (4)

A study of metabolic pathways and their regulation; nucleic acid structure, function and processing; regulation of gene expression; and current technologies used to study and combat diseases resulting from deficiencies in normal biochemical processes. Lecture and lab. Prerequisite: BIO 3510/CHE 3510. (Spring, even numbered years). Fee charged. Cross listed as BIO 3520.

CHE 4000—Principles of Physical Chemistry (3)

A study of three laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, PHY 2110, and CHE 1040-50. Lecture only. (Offered alternate years).

CHE 4010—Physical Chemistry I (4)

A study of three laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria. Prerequisites: MAT 1510-1520, PHY 2110-20, and CHE 1040-50. Recommended: MAT 2550. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years). Fee charged. Cross listed as PHY 4010.

CHE 4020—Physical Chemistry II (4)

Explores selected recent advances in physical chemistry including quantum mechanics, atomic phenomena, chemical kinetics, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: MAT 1510-1520, PHY 2110-20, and CHE 1040-50. Recommended: MAT 2550. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years). Fee charged. Cross listed as PHY 4020.

CHE 4330—Special Projects in Chemistry (1-3)

Open to chemistry majors and minors with advanced standing. The course consists of individual study in a chosen field under the supervision of the faculty member in that area of chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 1040-50 plus the advanced course in the area of study. Non-majors may take course by special permission.

CHE 4335—Seminar in Chemistry (1)

Consists of projects and paper presented and reported to the science faculty and science majors.

CHE 4340—Research Projects in Chemistry (1-3)

Limited to chemistry majors and minors. Individual or small group research in a selected field. Emphasis is on basic research techniques. Research is under supervision of a faculty member in chemistry. Prerequisite: beginning courses in major/minor plus courses pertinent to area of research.

CHE 4510—Career Internship in Chemistry (1-3)

Work in an off-campus chemistry laboratory under faculty supervision. Recommended for students planning a career in chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 2530. Supervision coordinated with the Office of Career Services. Maximum of 6 hours. Graded S/U.

PHYSICS

PHY 1010—Basic College Physics I (4)

An introductory treatment of mechanics, vibration, wave motion, sound, and fluids. Emphasis will be placed on the conceptual aspects of these topics with many illustrative examples drawn from biology and medicine. This course does not require prior knowledge of calculus. Mathematics above high school algebra is not required. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

PHY 1020—Basic College Physics II (4)

A continuation of PHY 1010 emphasizing heat, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, geometrical and physical optics, topics in atomic, quantum and nuclear physics. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

PHY 1040—The Physics of Sound (3)

A practical introduction to the basic principles of physics that govern the production, perception, recording and reproduction of music and sound. Topics discussed include simple harmonic motion, waves, resonance, spectral analysis, audio electronics, auditorium acoustics and hearing. The laboratory component of this course provides hands-on experiments that illustrate many of the topics covered in the class. Prerequisite: MAT 1055.

PHY 2030—Digital Electronics (4)

A study of the elements and applications of digital logic. Topics include logic fundamentals, minimization techniques, arithmetic circuits, combinatorial circuits, flip-flops, registers and finite state machines. Designs are developed using a Hardware Description Language (Verilog HDL or VHDL) and implemented in hardware on an FPGA. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years.) Fee charged. Cross listed as ITI 2030.

PHY 2100—Object-Oriented Design and Programming in Java I (3)

An IT core course designed to provide an in-depth, hands-on introduction to designing and developing software using the Java programming language. Design methodologies, object modeling with UML, structured programming, and data structures are also reviewed. Extensive lab time will help to develop skills needed when developing software. Prerequisite: ITI 2000 or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ITI 2100.

PHY 2110-2120—General Physics I, II (4), (4)

For students with an interest in science, engineering, and medicine. Includes mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, light, and modern physics. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, 1520. Fee charged.

PHY 2130—Statics (3)

The elements of statics with application to systems of forces in two and three dimensions (particles and rigid bodies), resultants, equivalent systems, and equilibria. Vector notation is introduced. Friction. Corequisite: PHY 2120, MAT 1520. (Offered alternate years.)

PHY 2550—Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering (3)

Designed to give accelerated access to upper level physical science courses by providing, in one semester, the essential background in mathematical methods. Course content may include multivariable calculus, linear algebra, complex functions, vector calculus, differential equations, and special functions. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, MAT 1520. (Cross listed as MAT 2550)

PHY 3130—Circuits (4)

Elements of AC/DC circuits with semiconductor devices as applied to computing and other systems. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years.) Fee charged.

PHY 3200—Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism (4)

A study that covers electrostatics, electric fields, potential, dielectrics, magnetic fields, currents, and introduction to Maxwell's equations. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PHY 2110, PHY 2120, PHY 2550 and MAT 1510 and 1520 and MAT 2510. (Offered alternate years.) Fee charged.

PHY 3300—Intermediate Mechanics (4)

A study of the states of systems of particles and of rigid bodies using Newton's Laws and conservation principles. Covering topics such as kinematics and dynamics of system particles, rotation proportions of rigid bodies, and motion under a central force. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PHY 2110, PHY 2120, PHY 2550 and MAT 1510 and 1520 and MAT 2510. (Offered alternate years.) Fee charged.

PHY 4010—Thermodynamics (4)

A study of the first, second, and third laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibria, and reaction equilibria. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: PHY 2120, MAT 1520. Recommended: MAT 2550 (Offered alternate years.) Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 4010.

PHY 4020—Modern Physics (4)

A course that explores some of the concepts that revolutionized physics in the early 20th century. Topics include relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic phenomena, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: PHY 2120, MAT 1520. Recommended: MAT 2550. Lecture and lab. (Offered alternate years.) Fee charged. Cross listed as CHE 4020.

PHY 4330—Special Projects in Physics (1-3)

Open to science majors and minors with advanced standing. Individual study in a chosen field under the supervision of a faculty member in Physics. Non-majors may take course by special permission.

PHY 4335—Seminar in Physics (1)

Consists of projects and paper presented and reported to the science faculty and science majors.

PHY 4340—Research Projects in Physics (1-3)

Limited to physics majors and minors. Individual or small group research in a selected field. Emphasis is on basic research techniques. Research is under supervision of a faculty member in physics. Prerequisite: beginning courses in major/minor, plus courses pertinent to area of research.

PHY 4400—Quantum Mechanics (4)

An introduction to the foundations and applications of quantum mechanics. Topics include solutions to the time-independent Schrodinger equation, the Dirac formalism, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum and perturbation theory. (offered alternate years.) Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, MAT 1520, MAT 2510, MAT 3020, PHY 2550 and PHY 4020. Fee charged.

PHY 4510—Career Internship in Physics (1-3)

Work in off-campus physics lab under faculty supervision. Recommended for students planning a career in science. Supervision coordinated with Office of Career Services. Maximum 6 hrs. Graded S/U.

SCIENCE

SCI 1050—Science Philosophy and Practice (1)

An introduction to the methods used in the practice of science and the philosophies and standards that guide the scientific community as it seeks to advance the understanding of the natural world. Topics will include the process of science, scientific ethics, analysis and presentation of the results of scientific studies, reading and writing peer-reviewed scientific papers, and careers in science.

SCI 1500—Life Science (3)

A study of biological concepts including the chemistry of life, principles of inheritance, evolutionary theories, biological organization of various organisms, and relationships between organisms and their environment. Issues related to current advances in biotechnology and medicine are also considered. The process of scientific inquiry is emphasized and practiced in both the lecture and laboratory. Fee charged.

SCI 1600—Physical Science (3)

Designed to convey the nature of matter and methods of study in the physical sciences and to study physical science concepts; issues and values related to the well being of individuals, society and the environment are considered. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

SCI 2000—Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

An introduction to environmental science and the scope of environmental problems facing the world. The course focuses on the rapidly increasing rate at which these problems are occurring and the changes they are setting in motion in the biosphere and the interconnectedness of humans in the world ecosystem. Material from Rachel Carson, Paul Hawken and the Creation Care document published by Compassionate Ministries division are all used. This course can be used for the General Education laboratory science curriculum requirement. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

SCI 2150—Introduction to Computer Technology for the Sciences (3)

A hands-on introduction to computer-based measurements, automation, and graphical programming for the sciences. The LabVIEW graphical programming environment will be introduced and used to write software applications that collect, display and analyze experimental data. Automated experiments in the areas of biology, chemistry and physics will be designed and implemented. Topics such as sensors, signals, data acquisition, error analysis, and noise will be explored. The use of standard office spreadsheet, word-processing, and presentation software for scientific data analysis and reporting will also be emphasized.

SCI 2200—Physical Geology (3)

Covers earth processes and their effects on the materials, structure, and morphology of the earth's crust. Laboratory includes field work, study of rocks, minerals, models, topographic and aerial photographs. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

SCI 2500—Integrated Science for Elementary Educators (3)

Provides a comprehensive exploration of the major topics in earth and space, life, physical, and environmental sciences. Cross listed as EDU 2503.

SCI 2501—Integrated Science for Elementary Educators: Proficiency (0)

Designed to confirm proficiency of a candidate's scientific skills and understanding of conceptual ideas required for teaching of elementary science. Life, physical, earth and space, and environmental strands of science will be addressed. Candidates must achieve a cut off score on the proficiency assessment.

SCI 2510—Earth and Space Science (3)

Covers topics of geology, astronomy, meteorology, oceanography. Suitable for elementary or secondary education majors and for general education. Lab activities related to each major topic are included. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

SCI 2600—Issues in Science (3)

An introduction to themes in the natural sciences that have significantly impacted our world. Among the themes discussed are relativity, modern cosmology, evolutionary thought, biotechnology, advances in modern medicine, biodiversity, and the use of natural resources. Scientific discoveries will be approached with both a historical perspective and a consideration of current and future applications. Interactions of scientific thought and the Christian worldview are considered.

SCI 4330—Special Projects in Earth and Space Science (1-3)

Individual study in a chosen area of earth and space science under the supervision of the faculty member in this area. Selected activities are also included.

MATHEMATICS

MAT 1030—Integrated Math for Elementary Educators (3)

Provides a look at elementary mathematics in depth. Mathematical concepts will be explored both conceptually and procedurally. Participants will be encouraged to see mathematics not only through the formulas required to find answers but also through creative methods that promote understanding of the concepts. A variety of math manipulatives will be used. Cross listed as EDU 2502.

MAT 1031—Integrated Math for Elementary Educators: Proficiency (0)

Designed to confirm proficiency of a candidate's mathematical skills and understanding of conceptual ideas required for teaching of elementary mathematics. Candidates must achieve a cut off score on the proficiency assessment.

MAT 1040—Concepts of Mathematics (3)

Considers the realm of mathematics as some of the greatest ideas of humankind—ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. This course will introduce students to several of these ideas, selected from topics in numerical patterns, infinity, geometry, topology, chaos, probability, and statistics. Study of these topics will not only demonstrate the beauty of mathematics but will also develop critical thinking skills. This course is designed for liberal arts majors to satisfy the general education requirement.

MAT 1044—Applied Mathematics for Business (3)

A brief overview of functions, with particular attention to linear and quadratic functions, emphasizing business applications such as supply and demand curves and optimization, followed by exponential and logarithmic functions; business applications such as compound interest, present value, annuities and amortization; probability and statistics. Prerequisite: INT 0960 Intermediate Algebra.

MAT 1055—College Algebra (3)

A brief review of concepts of algebra followed by a study of equations and inequalities; polynomial and rational functions and their graphs; solutions to polynomial equations; exponential and logarithmic functions; and systems of equations and inequalities. Prerequisite: INT 0960 Intermediate Algebra.

MAT 1070—Mathematical Ideas and Reasoning (3)

Designed to provide some insight into the nature of mathematics by examining various mathematical structures. Topics include the development of the real number system, conventional and unconventional algorithms including working in different bases, elementary number theory, algebraic reasoning, data analysis, probability, geometry, and measurement. Critical thinking, writing, and problem solving will be emphasized.

MAT 1250—Discrete Mathematics (3)

A study of discrete structures geared toward those entering information technology fields. Topics include problem solving, numeration systems, sets, logic, relations, recursion, graphs and trees, sorting, and elementary data structures. (Fall, even numbered years.)

MAT 1310—Precalculus (3)

A brief review of polynomial and rational functions and systems, and of exponential and logarithmic functions. Study of trigonometric functions, graphs, formulas and identities; inverse functions, including inverse trigonometric functions; solutions to systems of equations; and polar coordinate systems. Prerequisite: MAT 1055 or the equivalent.

MAT 1350—Statistical Analysis for the Sciences (3)

An introductory statistics course with an emphasis on exploratory and inferential techniques for analyzing and modeling data. Topics include descriptive statistics, regression, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and experiment design. Statistical software is implemented throughout the course. Prerequisite: MAT 1055 or equivalent.

MAT 1400—Perspectives in Mathematics (1)

An introduction to mathematical thought for students, especially freshmen, who are interested in a mathematics major or minor, or for any student interested in learning about some important ideas and uses of mathematics. Several contemporary mathematical topics will be studied, such as recently solved problems, orders of infinity, Fermat's last theorem, Tangles and knot theory, cryptography, the fourth dimension, the four-color theorem, topology, or fractals and chaos. Prerequisite: High school algebra and trigonometry. Calculus is NOT necessary. Graded S, U.

MAT 1510-1520—Calculus I and II (4), (4)

A study of Cartesian and polar coordinates, parametric equations, vectors and vector-valued functions in 2 and 3 dimensions, limits, differentiation of functions with applications, integration of functions with applications, Taylor polynomials, and series. It is strongly recommended that students take PHY 2110 and PHY 2120 concurrently with MAT 1510 and MAT 1520, respectively. Prerequisites for MAT 1510: MAT 1310 or equivalent; Prerequisite for MAT 1520: MAT 1510. (Fall and Spring, respectively, every year).

MAT 2510—Calculus III (4)

A study of partial derivatives and multiple integrals and additional topics in vector-valued functions. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Fall, every year).

MAT 2550—Mathematical Methods for Physical Science and Engineering (3)

Designed to give accelerated access to upper level physical science courses by providing, in one semester, the essential background in mathematical methods. Course content may include multivariable calculus, linear algebra, complex functions, vector calculus, differential equations, and special functions. Prerequisites: MAT 1510, MAT 1520. (Cross listed as PHY 2550)

MAT 2600—Introduction to Abstract Mathematics (3)

Study of basic ideas and methods of mathematics including sets, logic, proof techniques, relations, functions, mathematical induction, and modular arithmetic. Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 1520. (Spring, every year.)

MAT 2800—Program Design and Data Structures (4)

The study of elementary data structures, their associated algorithms and their application in problems; rigorous development of programming techniques and style; design and implementation of programs with multiple modules, using good data structures and good programming style. Prerequisite: PHY 3500. (Offered as needed.)

MAT 3000—Theory of Probability and Mathematical Statistics (3)

Probability of sample spaces, random variables, discrete and continuous probability distributions. Analysis of the principles of descriptive and inferential statistics. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Fall, even numbered years.)

MAT 3010—Discrete Methods (3)

Discrete mathematical ideas including graph theory, counting techniques, recurrence relations, and methods of solving applied problems. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Fall, odd numbered years.)

MAT 3020—Differential Equations (3)

An introduction to ordinary differential equations, including linear and nonlinear equations with applications, power series solutions, and Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years.)

MAT 3050—Introduction to Operations Research (3)

Study of methods and ideas in operations research including linear programming using the simplex method and interior point methods, nonlinear programming, stochastic processes and Markov chains. Prerequisite: MAT 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years.)

MAT 3090—Linear and Matrix Algebra (3)

Linear equations, vector operations, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular values and singular vectors, canonical forms, polynomial functions of matrices, vector spaces, and related topics. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Spring, even numbered years.

MAT 3500—Discrete Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Models for biological processes based on discrete mathematics (graphs, combinatorics), probabilistic and optimization methods, Markov chains and Markov fields, Monte-Carlo simulation, maximum-likelihood estimation, entropy, and information. Applications selected from epidemiology, inheritance and genetic drift, phylogenetics, combinatorics and sequence alignment of nucleic acids, energy optimization in protein structure prediction, and topology of biological molecules. Prerequisites: MAT 1520, MAT 3000, BIO 1520. (Offered alternate years.) Cross listed as MBI 3500 and BIO 3500.

MAT 3600—Continuous Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Models for biological processes based on ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics selected from models of population growth, predator-prey dynamics, biological oscillators, reaction-diffusion systems, pattern formation, neuronal and blood flow physiology, neural networks, and biomechanics. Prerequisite: MAT 3020, BIO 1520. (Fall, odd numbered years.) Cross listed with MBI 3600 and BIO 3400.

MAT 3700—Bioinformatics (3)

Introduces the scientist to Bioinformatics, which uses computer databases to store, retrieve and assist in understanding biological information. Genome-scale sequencing projects have led to an explosion of genetic sequences available for automated analysis. These gene sequences are the codes, which direct the production of proteins that in turn regulate all life processes. The student will be shown how these sequences can lead to a much fuller understanding of many biological processes allowing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to determine for example new drug targets or to predict if particular drugs are applicable to all patients. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts behind Bioinformatics and Computational Biology tools. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of the most commonly used online tools and resources. Prerequisites: MAT 3020, BIO 1520. (Spring, even numbered years.) Cross listed with MBI 3700 and BIO 3750.

MAT 4030—Introduction to Real Analysis (3)

Real number system, functions, sequences, limits, continuity, uniform continuity, infinite series and sequences. Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 2510 and MAT 2600. (Fall, odd numbered years.)

MAT 4060—Modern Algebra (3)

Sets, groups, rings, and fields. Logical rigorous proofs and analysis are emphasized. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Fall, even numbered years.)

MAT 4080—Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries (3)

A study of plane geometry based on Euclid's axioms, both with and without the parallel postulate. The course includes formal study of the consequences of these axioms, transformational geometry, and algebraic models of both Euclidean and non-Euclidean systems. Prerequisite: MAT 2600. (Spring, even numbered years.)

MAT 4110—Topics in Mathematics (1-3)

In-depth coverage of one topic to be selected from pure or applied mathematics, with regard to interest of the instructor and students. Possible topics include combinatorics, number theory, differential geometry, topology, numerical analysis, coding theory, cryptology, partial differential equations, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, probability, or statistics. Permission of the instructor required. May be repeated for credit. (Offered as needed.)

MAT 4120—Special Studies in Mathematics (1-3)

In-depth coverage of topics to be selected from pure or applied mathematics, with regard to the interest of the instructor and students. This course would be focused primarily on review, exam preparation, or other appropriate mathematical material. Permission of the instructor is required. May be repeated for credit. Graded S/U. (Offered as needed.)

MAT 4330—Directed Study in Math (1-3)

For advanced students working on special projects supervised by the instructor.

MAT 4335—Seminar in Mathematics (1)

Projects and paper presented to the mathematics faculty and other mathematics majors. To be taken by seniors. (Offered as needed.)

MAT 4510—Career Internship in Mathematics (1-3)

Mathematics service laboratory (on-the-job experience) under the supervision of faculty. Juniors and seniors only. Supervision coordinated with the Office of Career Services. Maximum 6 hrs. Graded S/U.

MBI 3500—Discrete Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Models for biological processes based on discrete mathematics (graphs, combinatorics), probabilistic and optimization methods, Markov chains and Markov fields, Monte-Carlo simulation, maximum-likelihood estimation, entropy, and information. Applications selected from epidemiology, inheritance and genetic drift, phylogenetics, combinatorics and sequence alignment of nucleic acids, energy optimization in protein structure prediction, and topology of biological molecules. Prerequisites: MAT 1520, MAT 3000, BIO 1520. (Offered alternate years.) Cross listed as BIO 3500 and MAT 3500.

MBI 3600—Continuous Models in Mathematical Biology (3)

Models for biological processes based on ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics selected from models of population growth, predator-prey dynamics, biological oscillators, reaction-diffusion systems, pattern formation, neuronal and blood flow physiology, neural networks, and biomechanics. Prerequisite: MAT 3020, BIO 1520. (Fall, odd numbered years. Cross listed with BIO 3400 and MAT 3600.

MBI 3700—Bioinformatics (3)

Introduces the scientist to Bioinformatics, which uses computer databases to store, retrieve and assist in understanding biological information. Genome-scale sequencing projects have led to an explosion of genetic sequences available for automated analysis. These gene sequences are the codes, which direct the production of proteins that in turn regulate all life processes. The student will be shown how these sequences can lead to a much fuller understanding of many biological processes allowing pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to determine for example new drug targets or to predict if particular drugs are applicable to all patients. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts behind Bioinformatics and Computational Biology tools. Hands-on sessions will familiarize students with the details and use of the most commonly used online tools and resources. Prerequisites: MAT 3020, BIO 1520. (Spring, odd numbered years) Cross listed as MAT 3700 and BIO 3750.

ALLIED HEALTH

ALH 2100—Public School Health (3)

Designed to assist the future teacher in developing an understanding of the whole person, including physical, mental, emotional and spiritual development; the continuum of health and how it interrelates with academic performance. Prevention of disease, first aid, CPR, choking, drug abuse, current health issues, and health care agencies are presented to increase the potential teacher's awareness in assisting students in all areas of their lives which affect their academic success.

ALH 2900—Pre-Physical Therapy Practicum (1-4)

Designed for Pre-Physical Therapy majors to help them gain knowledge and experience in the field of Physical Therapy.

ALH 3060—Medical Terminology (1)

Designed to help the students who major in one of the allied health areas to recognize, spell, pronounce, and define medical terms correctly.

NURSING

NUR 2040—Health Assessment (3)

Provides an introduction to the basic skills utilized in data collection and physical assessment. The focus is on interviewing skills and systematic physical examination in assessing the physiological and psychosociocultural health status of clients of various age groups. Campus laboratory provides the opportunity for application of theoretical knowledge and performance of health assessments, with healthy individuals. Two hours lecture and two hours campus laboratory a week. Students will also enroll in NUR 2041, Health Assessment Lab. Co requisite: BIO 2020.

NUR 2100—Nutrition for Health Care (3)

Addresses nutrition as a major component of health maintenance and promotion throughout the lifespan. Content serves as a foundation for clinical application in other nursing courses. Prerequisite: BIO 2010. Co requisite: NUR 2040, BIO 2020.

NUR 2240—Pathophysiology (3)

A study of concepts and diseases common to the general practice of nursing. Prerequisites: BIO 2010 and BIO 2020. Co requisite: NUR 2410.

NUR 2410—Introduction to Nursing (5)

An introduction to nursing concepts and theory, nursing processes and those skills which are basic to the practice of professional nursing. ($350.00 course fee) Students will also enroll in NUR 2411 (lab), NUR 2412 (Clinical). Co requisites: NUR 2040, NUR 2100 and NUR 2240.

NUR 3000—Professional Nursing II (2)

Explores moral, ethical and legal issues in nursing practice. Personal and professional awareness is encouraged through values clarification and other methodologies. Co requisite: This course is taken concurrently with NUR 3210.

NUR 3140—Pharmacology (3)

Provides a study of the nurse's role and responsibilities in clinical pharmacology. The course focuses on the major drug classifications, principles of drug actions/interactions, and nursing implications. Current trends in pharmacologic therapy will be discussed. Prerequisite: Junior standing in Nursing or consent of the instructor.

NUR 3210—Adult Health Nursing I (5)

Studies in theories, skills and responses of adults in health and illness. ($325.00 course fee) Students will also enroll in NUR 3211 (lab), NUR 3212 (Clinical). Prerequisites: NUR 2240 and NUR 2410. Co requisite: NUR 3140.

NUR 3410—Mental Health Nursing Concepts (5)

A study of theories, concepts and responses related to mental health and illness. ($300.00 course fee) Students will also enroll in NUR 3412 (Clinical). Prerequisite or Co requisite: PSY 4150, Abnormal Psychology.

NUR 3630—Basic Cardiac Arrhythmia (3)

An elective course which provides the student with the skills utilized in interpretation of basic cardiac arrhythmia. The focus is on recognition of the key features of each arrhythmia along with the physiological consequences and signs and symptoms of each. In addition, management of each arrhythmia is reviewed.

NUR 3712—Nursing Externship (3)

An elective clinical practicum of planned and supervised clinical experiences. Seminar and independent research study will be utilized to meet course requirements for the work-study experience. Students will spend approximately 350 hours in clinical affiliate on day, evening, night or weekend shifts and 10 hours in seminar (total 360 hours) working with an RN preceptor. Enrollment is limited to qualified students chosen by a selection committee and approved by the Dean of Nursing.

NUR 3850—Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing (3)

A study of theoretical knowledge and skills used in the nursing process as it relates to nursing research. Three hours per week.

NUR 3950-4950—International Studies (3-6)

Study in a foreign country. Individual course titles and locations are assigned for each course taken.

NUR 4015—Senior Nursing Capstone (3)

A course that explores moral, ethical and legal issues in health care delivery. The student's transition into professional nursing practice will be addressed. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Nursing.

NUR 4210-—Family Nursing: Childbearing (5)

A study of theories, concepts and responses related to childbearing individuals and their families. ($300.00 course fee). Students will also enroll in NUR 4211 (Lab) and NUR 4212 (Clinical). Prerequisite: NUR 3210.

NUR 4310—Family Nursing: Infant to Adolescent (5)

Study of theory and skills used in the nursing process related to the child and young family. ($250.00 course fee). Students will also enroll in NUR 4311 (Lab) and NUR 4312 (Clinical). Prerequisite: Senior standing in Nursing.

NUR 4410—Adult Health Nursing II (5)

A study of theoretical knowledge and skills associated with the care of the acutely ill adult. The focus will be on utilization of the nursing process in providing nursing care to clients with complex physiological and psychosocial needs. ($250.00 course fee). Students will also enroll in NUR 4411 (Lab) and NUR 4412 (Clinical). Prerequisite: Senior standing in Nursing.

NUR 4500—Family Nursing: The Aging Adult (2)

A study of the theories of the aging process and the responses of the older adult in health and illness. Prerequisite: NUR 3210 and consent of instructor.

NUR 4510—Community Health Nursing (5)

The study of theoretical knowledge and skills used in the nursing process related to individuals, families and the community as a client. Theoretical concepts integral to community health nursing and strategies for nursing intervention for the promotion of community health will be identified. ($250.00 course fee). Students will also enroll in NUR 4512 (Clinical). Prerequisites: Senior standing in Nursing or consent of instructor.

NUR 4610—Leadership and Management in Nursing (5)

Presents leadership and management principles related to nursing practice in the health care system. ($250.00 course fee). Students will also enroll in NUR 4612 (Clinical). Prerequisites: Senior standing in Nursing or consent of instructor.

NUR 4710—Senior Practicum (2)

Includes concentrated senior clinical experience in a selected practice area as well as synthesis exercises in the classroom and computer laboratory. Students must pass a comprehensive exam in nursing in order to pass this course. This course is only offered on a Pass/Fail basis. ($250.00 course fee). Prerequisite: Senior standing in Nursing.