Department of Communication Studies

FACULTY

J. DOUGLAS LEPTER, Chair, Department of Communication Studies, Professor of Communication, 1992—
BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1972; MA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1973; ThM, Asbury Theological Seminary, 1990; PhD, University of Kentucky, 1996.

MARK. D. BISHOP, Associate Professor of Communication, 2013—
BA, Olivet Nazarene University, 1993; MA, Governor's State University, 2004.

JAMEY DURHAM, Associate Professor of Communication, 2011—
BS, University of Tennessee, 1988; MFA, Regent University, 2000.

JEFFREY D. FRAME, Professor of Drama and Communication, 1990—
BA, Eastern Nazarene College, 1985; MA, Emerson College, 1988; PhD, Middle Tennessee State University, 2012.

LENA HEGI WELCH, Dean of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Communication, 1988—
BA, Trevecca Nazarene University, 1981; MA, Auburn University, 1983; EdD, Trevecca Nazarene University, 2005.

Department of Communication Studies General Information

The Department of Communication Studies offers broad training in the general area of human communication. The curriculum provides considerable flexibility and is designed to fit a variety of student needs and career interests. There are seven specialized majors that lead to the Bachelor's degree: 1) Dramatic Arts, 2) Theatre Education, 3) Interpersonal Communication, 4) Organizational Communication, 5) Mass Media, 6) Journalism, and 7) Speech Communication Education. The teaching majors are approved by the Tennessee Board of Education and are part of the unit accredited by NCATE. The Department also offers a Bachelor's degree in the general "Communication Studies" major consisting of courses selected from the specialized programs listed above. This Communication Studies major allows students to tailor their study to individual career goals.

In addition to classroom course offerings, practical experience can be achieved through internships and individualized instruction in the bachelor's degree programs.

Mission Statements and Student Learning Outcomes for Department Academic Majors

Communication Studies

Mission Statement

The Communication Studies major seeks to provide graduates with a general yet comprehensive academic foundation in the study of human communication. The major is a hybrid departmental curriculum which allows students to selectively choose the most suitable courses from across the department's program offerings to meet their individualized educational objectives.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Communication Studies major will be able to:

  1. Possess knowledge suitable for employment in a career requiring communication skills.
  2. Conduct a primary research project demonstrating either qualitative or quantitative research skills.
  3. Demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge necessary for admission into graduate school in communication or a related field.

Dramatic Arts

Mission Statement

The Dramatic Arts major seeks to prepare graduates with a broad understanding of theatre to succeed professionally in educational, community, and/or professional theatre venues and/or to succeed in graduate theatre programs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Dramatic Arts major will be able to:

  1. Begin graduate studies or a career in or directly related to professional theatre.
  2. Critically assess a theatre production's relative merits and weaknesses within the global contexts of artistic expression and spiritual significance.
  3. Satisfy proficiently at least ONE of the basic collaborative roles for the production of a play that is at least one-act in length, or longer. The roles graduates may choose from are: director of the play, performer in a major character role of the play; author of the script; lighting designer of the play; scene designer of the play; or costume designer of the play.

Theatre Education

The Theatre Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

Interpersonal Communication

Mission Statement

Graduates in Interpersonal Communication will understand the role and nature of communication in interpersonal relationships and will demonstrate skills such as listening, empathy, trust, and conflict management that are critical to effective leadership and service.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with an Interpersonal Communication major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate skills necessary for employment in a career requiring interpersonal communication skills.
  2. Demonstrate skills in oral and written communication.
  3. Possess knowledge necessary for admission into a graduate program in communication or a related field.

Organizational Communication

Mission Statement

The Organizational Communication major seeks to prepare graduates with strong relational communication, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. Graduates will understand the role of messages, meanings, and information flow in and between organizations and are prepared for employment in corporations and non-profit organizations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with an Organizational Communication major will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate skills necessary for employment in a career requiring organizational communication skills.
  2. Identify a major theorist in the discipline of organizational communication.
  3. Demonstrate skills in oral and written communication.
  4. Possess knowledge required for admission into graduate study in communication or a related field.

Mass Media

Mission Statement

The Mass Media major seeks to prepare graduates who have a broad-based understanding of mediated communication. The curriculum emphasizes media convergence in that students are exposed to both traditional and new media, and students learn to develop content and skills which are transferrable to virtually any medium.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Mass Media major will be able to:

  1. Write, edit, and produce media products, such as feature films, documentaries, training videos, short films, audio productions, and webcasts.
  2. Demonstrate skills necessary for a variety of jobs in mass media fields.
  3. Demonstrate skills in critical thinking, clear and thoughtful communication, and open inquiry through research and creative activity.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge necessary for admissions into a graduate program in mass communication, communication studies, journalism, film studies, or related fields.

Journalism

Mission Statement

The Journalism major seeks to prepare graduates to identify and communicate news, ideas, and information. Through academic study and hands-on experience, students will understand the role of news and information in society and be able to research, report, and deliver information across several media.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates with a Journalism major will be able to:

  1. Identify newsworthy events, ideas, and information and effectively report and organize information into compelling stories for multiple audiences.
  2. Conduct independent investigation to research, analyze, organize, and report information on a contemporary topic.
  3. Write compelling stories about events, issues, trends, and people.
  4. Communicate information effectively to particular audiences through text, audio, video, and other media.
  5. Exhibit skills necessary for employment in the field of journalism and/or succeed in graduate/professional programs.

Speech Communication Education

The Speech Communication Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

BA or BS in Communication Studies

This program provides a broad–based study of human communication. The course of study is designed by the student with the advisor's consent. Students whose programs consist primarily of dramatic arts and public speaking courses will be awarded the Bachelor of Arts degree. Those students who concentrate in interpersonal, organizational, mass media, and journalism course work will be awarded the Bachelor of Science degree.

General Education

51 hours

Major

34 hours

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

The remaining 21 hours are to be taken from courses offered by the department. At least 17 of the total 34 hours in the major must be upper–division (3000 and 4000 level) courses.

Additional requirement:

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

Minor (Student's Choice)

15-18 hours

General Electives

15-18 hours

Total

120 hours

Communication Studies Four-Year Plan*

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

 

 

General Education Intercultural Literacy Choice

(2-3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 16-17

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

COM

 

Electives

(6)

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technologies

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

General Education Mathematics

(3)

 

 

General Elective (only if Intercultural Literacy requirement taken first semester was 2 credits)

(1)

COM

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 14-15

Semester 4

 

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

General Education Natural Science Laboratory Choice

(3)

COM

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Behavioral Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

Total 14

Junior Year

Semester 5

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

 

 

World Aesthetics Choice

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II (fulfilling general education contexts requirement)

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

COM

4550

Research Methods Communication Studies

(3)

COM

 

Elective

(3)

 

 

Minor or General Electives**

(3)

 

 

General Electives

(3)

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

General Electives

(5)

COM

 

Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Total

120 hours

*At least 17 of the total 34 hours in the major must be upper-division (3000 and 4000 level) courses.

**Dependent upon student's choice of minor.

Dramatic Arts BA

The Dramatic Arts program provides opportunity for study of and participation in educational, community, or professional theatre. Learning occurs not only in classroom settings but also through actual experiences in every phase of dramatic production. The program is designed to integrate personal Christian faith and belief with the goals and aim of drama.

General Education

51 hours

Major

39-40 hours

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance (6 satisfactory semesters)

(0)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2410

Acting I: Theory and Practice

(2)

One of the following three courses is also required:

(2)

 

COM

2420

Acting II: Improvisation and Viewpoints (2)

 

 

COM

3410

Acting III: Meisner (2)

 

 

COM

3420

Acting IV: Shakespeare (2)

 

COM

2950

Script Analysis

(1)

COM

3400

Theatre History and Dramatic Literature

(3)

COM

3450

Playwriting Workshop

(2)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4030

Design and Production for the Stage

(3)

COM

4040

Play Directing

(3)

COM

422
A–F

Drama Practicum

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4410

Modern Drama in Performance

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4600

Junior/Senior Seminar in Dramatic Arts

(1)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(2)

 

 

Electives in Dramatic Arts

(2-3)

Co-Curricular Requirements for Dramatic Arts Majors and Minors

The Trevecca Department of Communication Studies supports and directs a required co-curricular program for all dramatic arts majors and minors to supplement classroom theory, to encourage students to receive practical training through participation, and to benefit the University and surrounding communities.

The Trevecca Dramatic Arts Program presents 3-4 major dramatic productions during the academic year. Students majoring and minoring in dramatic arts must participate in 20 hours of some aspect of each production for 6 semesters at Trevecca. The semesters during which participation occurs do not need to be consecutive. Participation is open to all members of the University and local community. Likewise, dramatic arts majors and minors must attend all senior project presentations each year.

Senior Project Requirements for Dramatic Arts Majors

All senior Dramatic Arts majors are required (either in the fall or spring semester by choice) to present a performance project which will be open to the general public. Projects must include a pre-production prospectus, a performance component (acting, directing, design, etc.). The project should relate to the student's specialized interest in the field, demonstrate his or her acquired skills, and be academically and vocationally beneficial as a culminative experience. (All dramatic arts majors and minors are required to attend the projects of seniors.) Seniors will receive two (2) credits for the senior project.

Additional requirement:

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

Minor (Student's Choice)

15-18 hours

General Electives

9-13 hours

Total

120 hours

Dramatic Arts Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

 

 

General Education Mathematics

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology (if even year)

 

 

 

or

 

COM

2410

Acting I: Theory and Practice (if odd year)

 

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 2

 

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Institutional choice

(3)

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance

(0)

COM

2950

Script Analysis (if odd year)

(1)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Acting option (if even year)

(2)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics choice

(3)

 

 

General Education Behavioral Science choice

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

Total 16-17

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

ENG

1080

Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance

(0)

COM

422
A-F

Drama Practicum

(1)

 

 

Minor

(3)

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology (if even year)

 

 

 

or

 

COM

2410

Acting I: Theory and Practice (if odd year)

 

 

Total 15

Semester 4

 

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II (fulfilling General Education Contexts choice)

 

 

 

General Education Natural Science Laboratory choice

(3)

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance

(0)

 

 

Minor

(3)

COM

3400

Theatre History and Dramatic Literature. (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (if even year)

 

COM

2950

Script Analysis (if odd year)

(1)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Acting option (if even year)

(2)

Total 15-16

Junior Year

Semester 5

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance

(0)

COM

422
A-F

Drama Practicum

(1)

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(2-3)

COM

4040

Play Directing (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

4030

Design and Production for the Stage (if even year)

 

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

 

 

Intercultural Literacy choice

(2-3)

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance

(0)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3450

Playwriting Workshop (if even year)

(2)

COM

3400

Theatre History and Dramatic Literature (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (if even year)

 

COM

422
A-F

Drama Practicum (if odd year)

(1)

 

 

or

 

COM

4600

Junior/Senior Seminar in Dramatic Arts (if even year)

 

COM

4410

Modern Drama in Performance (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (if odd year)

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

Total 14-16

Senior Year

Semester 7

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods Communication Studies

(3)

COM

1000

Production Participation and Project Attendance

(0)

 

 

Minor

(3)

COM

4040

Play Directing (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

4030

Design and Production for the Stage (if even year)

 

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor*

 

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Electives

 

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

COM

4600

Junior/Senior Seminar in Dramatic Art (if even year)s

(1)

 

 

or

 

COM

422
A-F

Drama Practicum (if odd year)

 

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(2)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies (if not taken in semester 7)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor*

 

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Electives

 

COM

4410

Modern Drama in Performance (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (if odd year)

 

COM

 

Drama Electives

(2-3)

COM

3450

Playwriting Workshop (if even year)

(2)

 

 

or

 

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking (if odd year)

(3)

 

Total 13-15

Total Plan of Study

120 hours

*Dependent upon student's choice of minor.

Theatre Education BA (K-12 Licensure)

The Theatre Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

Interpersonal Communication BS

The Interpersonal Communication major exists to prepare students to be effective and empathetic in their personal and professional lives. The curriculum emphasizes the development of interpersonal communication skills, such as listening, empathy, trust, and conflict management that are critical to effective leadership and service.

General Education

51 hours

Major

34 hours

COM

2010

Interpersonal Communication

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2810

Small Group Communication

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

3340

Language and Social Interaction

(3)

COM

3500

Nonverbal Communication

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4060

Social Influence

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

The remaining 3 hours may come from Communication Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Business or Political Science with advisor consent.

(3)

Additional requirement:

2 hours

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

Minor (Student's Choice)

15-18 hours

General Electives

15-18 hours

Total

120 hours

Interpersonal Communication Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

COM

2010

Interpersonal Communication

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II (fulfilling General Education Contexts Choice)

 

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

General Education Mathematics

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2810

Small Group Communication (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

 

 

 

and

 

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication (if even year)

 

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 4

 

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

General Education Natural Sciences Laboratory Choice

(3)

COM

3340

Language and Social Interaction (if even year) or General Electives (if odd year); taking place of General Education Intercultural Literacy requirement

(3)

 

 

General Education Behavioral Science Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

Total 14

Junior Year

Semester 5

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics Choice

(3)

COM

2810

Small Group Communication (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

 

 

 

and

 

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication (if even year)

 

 

 

Minor

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

COM

3340

Language and Social Interaction (if even year) or General Electives (if odd year; taking place of General Education Intercultural Literacy requirement)

(3)

COM

3500

Nonverbal Communication (if odd year) or General Elective (if even year)

(3)

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

COM

4060

Social Influence (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

General Elective (if even year)

 

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

Communication Elective*

(3)

 

 

Minor or General Elective**

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

COM

3500

Nonverbal Communication (if odd-numbered year) or General Elective (if even year)

(3)

COM

4060

Social Influence (if odd year) or General Elective (if even year)

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(2)

 

Total 15

Total Plan of Study

120 hours

*May also be PSY, SOC, BUS, or POL course work with advisor's consent

**Dependent upon student's choice of minor

Organizational Communication BS

The purpose of the Organizational Communication major is to study the role of messages, meanings, and information flow in and between organizations. Students majoring in Organizational Communication will consider both the theoretical and applied analyses of the role of communication in the functioning of complex organizations. The major encourages students to develop skills in oral, written, and relational communication, along with critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Through class work and internship opportunities, students sharpen their communication skills and prepare for employment in corporations and non-profit organizations.

General Education

51 hours

Major

34 hours

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2750

Human Relations in Organizations

(3)

COM

3000

Principles of Public Relations

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

3260

Organizational Communication

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4060

Social Influence

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

4560

Leadership in Christian Organizations

 

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

Choose two of the following:

(6)

POL

3000

International Relations (3)

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology (3)

 

BUS

2300

Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3)

 

COM

3040

Human Resources Management (3)

 

BUS

3700

Introduction to the Healthcare Industry (3)

 

COM

3150

Sales Fundamentals (3)

 

Additional requirement:

2 hours

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

Minor (Student's Choice)

15-18 hours

General Electives

15-18 hours

Total

120 hours

Organizational Communication Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II (fulfilling General Education Contexts choice)

 

 

 

General Education Natural Sciences Laboratory Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Behavioral Choice

(3)

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

General Education Mathematics Choice

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 4

 

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

COM

3000

Principles of Public Relations (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (if odd year)

 

COM

2750

Human Relations in Organization (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3260

Organizational Communication (odd year)

 

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

Total 14

Junior Year

Semester 5

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics Choice

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

Choose one of the following:

(3)

 

POL

3000

International Relations (3)

 

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology (3)

 

 

BUS

2300

Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3)

 

 

COM

3040

Human Resources Management (3)

 

 

BUS

3700

Introduction to the Healthcare Industry (3)

 

 

COM

3150

Sales Fundamentals (3)

 

 

 

General Elective

(3)

COM

2750

Human Relations in Organizations (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3260

Organizational Communication (if odd year)

 

COM

3000

Principles of Public Relations (if even year

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (if odd year)

 

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods Communication Studies

(3)

Choose one of the following:

(3)

 

POL

3000

International Relations (3)

 

 

PSY

3120

Social Psychology (3)

 

 

BUS

2300

Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (3)

 

 

COM

3040

Human Resources Management (3)

 

 

BUS

3700

Introduction to the Healthcare Industry (3)

 

 

COM

3150

Sales Fundamentals (3)

 

 

 

Minor or General Elective*

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

 

General Electives*

(3)

COM

4560

Leadership in Christian Organizations (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

4060

Social Influence (if odd year)

 

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

General Elective

(2)

 

Total 15

Total

120 hours

*Dependent upon student's choice of minor

Mass Media BS

General Education

51 hours

Major

46 hours

COM

2080

Video Production Practicum (1)

(3)

 

 

and/or

 

COM

2150

Station Staff Practicum (1)

 

 

 

(three semesters of practicum)

 

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media

(3)

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

(3)

COM

2220

Audio Production

(3)

COM

2620

Writing for Mass Media

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

3015

Digital Convergence Media

(3)

COM

3170

Voice and Articulation

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4300

Media Sales and Promotion

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

Electives in Mass Media (see course descriptions under Mass Media for options)

(9)

ITI 3800 and ITI 3820 can also count toward this major.

 

Additional requirement:

2 hours

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

Minor (Student's Choice)

15-18 hours

General Electives

3-6 hours

Total

120 hours

Mass Media Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

COM

2220

Audio Production

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

 

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

COM

2620

Writing for Mass Media

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II (fulfilling General Education Contexts choice)

 

 

 

General Education Natural Sciences Laboratory Choice

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Behavioral Choice (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media (odd year)

 

 

Total 15

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

General Education Mathematics Choice

(3)

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2220

Audio Production

 

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 16

Semester 4

 

 

 

Mass Media elective

(3)

 

 

General Education Intercultural Literacy Choice *

(2-3)

 

 

* General Elective (only if Intercultural Literacy requirement is 2 credits)

(1)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

 

 

General Education Human Science Behavioral Choice (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3260

Introduction to Mass Media (odd year)

 

COM

2080

Video Production Practicum

(1)

 

 

or

 

COM

2150

Station Staff Practicum

 

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Institutional Choice

(3)

Total 16

Junior Year

Semester 5

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics Choice

(3)

COM

3015

Digital Convergence Media (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Mass Media elective (odd year)

 

COM

3170

Voice and Articulation (odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (even year)

 

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 6

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

COM

3015

Digital Convergence Media (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Mass Media elective (odd year)

 

COM

4300

Media Sales and Promotion (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Mass Media elective (odd year)

 

 

 

Minor

(3)

COM

2080

Video Production Practicum

(1)

 

 

or

 

COM

2150

Station Staff Practicum

 

 

 

Minor or General Electives

(2)

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods Communication Studies

(3)

COM

3170

Voice and Articulation (odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Minor (even year)

 

COM

2080

Video Production Practicum

(1)

 

 

or

 

COM

2150

Station Staff Practicum

 

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 13

Semester 8

COM

4300

Media Sales and Promotion (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

 

 

Mass Media elective (odd year)

 

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 13

Total

120 hours

Journalism BS

General Education

51 hours

Major

46 hours

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media

(3)

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

(3)

COM

2620

Writing for Mass Media

(3)

COM

2890

Newspaper Practicum (3 semesters, 1 credit each)

(3)

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

3050

Layout and Design

(3)

COM

3650

Advanced Reporting

(3)

COM

3660

History of News/Journalism

(3)

COM

3670

Digital Media and Online Journalism

(3)

COM

3680

Feature/Magazine Writing

(3)

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4140

Broadcast Journalism

(3)

COM

4150

Issues in Journalism

(3)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

Additional requirement:

2 hours

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

Minor

15-18 hours

General Electives

3-6 hours

Total

120 hours

Journalism Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

Semester 1

ENG

1020

English Composition

(3)

REL

2000

Introduction to Biblical Faith

(3)

HPE

1500

Introduction to Health and Wellness

(2)

COM

2620

Writing for Mass Media

(3)

COM

1010

Speech Communication

(3)

INT

1100

Life Calling and Purpose

(3)

 

Total 17

Semester 2

 

ENG

1080

Critical Reading Writing Thinking

(3)

HIS

1400

World Civilization I

(3)

 

 

or

 

HIS

1450

World Civilization II (fulfilling General Education Contexts Choice)

 

 

 

General Education Human Sciences Institutional Choice (3)

(3)

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media (odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production (even year)

 

 

 

General Education Mathematics Elective

(3)

COM

2890

Newspaper Practicum

(1)

 

Total 16

Sophomore Year

Semester 3

ITI

1500

Office and Internet Technologies

(2)

 

 

or

 

ITI

1900

Business Information Technology

 

ENG

2000

World Literature

(3)

 

 

Minor

(3)

COM

3660

History of News and Journalism (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3680

Feature/Magazine Writing (if odd year)

 

 

 

General Education Behavioral Science Choice

(3)

 

Total 14

Semester 4

 

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media (odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

 

BUS

2010

Financial Stewardship

(2)

 

 

General Education Natural Sciences Laboratory Choice

(3)

COM

3650

Advanced Reporting (if odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3670

Digital Media and Online Journalism (if even year)

 

COM

2890

Newspaper Practicum

(1)

 

 

Minor

(3)

Total 15

Junior Year

Semester 5

PHL

2010

Introduction to Philosophy

(3)

 

 

World Aesthetics Choice

(3)

COM

3660

History of News and Journalism (if even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3680

Feature/Magazine Writing (if odd year)

 

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

COM

2890

Newspaper Practicum

(1)

 

 

General Education Intercultural Literacy Choice

(2-3)

 

Total 15-16

Semester 6

 

COM

3650

Advanced Reporting (odd year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

3670

Digital Media and Online Journalism (even year)

 

REL

3000

Christian Tradition

(3)

SCI

2600

Issues in Science

(3)

COM

3050

Layout and Design (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

4140

Broadcast Journalism (odd year)

 

 

 

Minor

(3)

 

Total 15

Senior Year

Semester 7

REL

4000

Christian Life and Ministry

(3)

COM

4550

Research Methods Communication Studies

(3)

 

 

Minor

(6)

 

 

Mass Media electives

(3)

 

Total 15

Semester 8

 

COM

3050

Layout and Design (even year)

(3)

 

 

or

 

COM

4140

Broadcast Journalism (odd year)

 

COM

4000

Advanced Public Speaking

(3)

COM

4800

Senior Project in Communication Studies

(1)

COM

4510

Career Internship in Communication Studies

(3)

COM

4150

Issues in Journalism

(3)

 

 

Minor or General Electives

(2-3)

 

Total 15-16

Total Plan of Study

120 hours

Speech Communication Education BA (7-12 Licensure)

The Speech Communication Education major is described in the Teacher Education Program section of the Catalog.

Communication Studies Minors

Art Minor

21 hours

ART

2000

Introduction to Drawing

(3)

ART

2020

Two Dimensional Design

(3)

ART

2025

Three Dimensional Design

(3)

ART

2030

Introduction to Painting

(3)

ART

2150

Art Appreciation I

(3)

ART

2160

Art Appreciation II

(3)

Choose one of the following:

(3)

 

ART

2010

Intermediate Drawing (3)

 

 

ART

2040

Intermediate Painting (3)

 

 

ART

2200

Mixed Media (3)

 

 

ITI

3800

Graphic Design and Imaging (3)

 

Communication Studies Minor

15 hours

COM

3010

Theories of Communication

(3)

 

 

Interpersonal Communication Elective

(3)

 

 

Mass Media Elective

(3)

 

 

Dramatic Arts Elective

(3)

 

 

Organizational Communication Elective

(3)

Dramatic Arts Minor

15-16 hours

COM

2950

Script Analysis

(1)

Four (4) of the five (5) courses:

(11-12)

 

COM

2350

Creative Drama

(3)

 

COM

2410

Acting I: Theory and Practice

(2)

 

COM

3400

Theatre History and Dramatic Literature

(3)

 

COM

4030

Design and Production for the Stage

(3)

 

COM

4040

Play Directing

(3)

 

Drama Elective

(3)

Applied Theatre Minor

22 hours

COM

1000

Production Participation (3 semesters)

(0)

COM

2460

Perspectives in Applied Theatre

(2)

SJS

2010

Introduction to Social Justice

(3)

SWK

2250

Introduction to Community Practice

(3)

COM

2350

Creative Drama

(3)

COM

2410

Acting I: Theory and Practice

(2)

 

 

or

 

COM

2420

Acting II: Improvisation and Viewpoints

 

SOC

3200

Social Problems

(3)

COM

3450

Playwriting Workshop

(2)

COM

4040

Play Directing

(3)

COM

4250

Field Practicum in Applied Theatre

(1)

Recommended as additional electives

 

 

SOC

3300

Urban Sociology

(3)

 

SOC

3350

U.S. Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

(3)

 

SOC

3410

Corrections

(3)

Interpersonal Communication Minor

15 hours

COM

2010

Interpersonal Communication

(3)

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2810

Small Group Communication

(3)

 

 

Interpersonal Communication Electives

(6)

Journalism Minor

16 hours

COM

2620

Writing for Mass Media

(3)

COM

3650

Advanced Reporting

(3)

COM

3660

History of News/Journalism

(3)

COM

3670

Digital Media and Online Journalism

(3)

COM

2890

Newspaper Practicum

(1)

Choose one of the following:

(3)

 

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media (3)

 

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production (3)

 

COM

3680

Feature/Magazine Writing (3)

 

COM

4140

Broadcast Journalism (3)

Mass Media Minor

18 hours

COM

2210

Introduction to Mass Media

(3)

COM

2620

Writing for Mass Media

(3)

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

(3)

COM

2220

Audio Production

(3)

COM

3035

Narrative Strategies in Film

(3)

 

 

Mass Media Elective

(3)

Music Theatre Interdisciplinary Minor

Offered in the Department of Music.

 

Organizational Communication Minor

15 hours

COM

2020

Principles of Intercultural Communication

(2)

COM

2030

Practicum in Intercultural Communication

(1)

COM

2750

Human Relations in Organizations

(3)

COM

3260

Organizational Communication

(3)

Choose two of the following:

(6)

 

COM

3000

Principles of Public Relations (3)

 

 

COM

4560

Leadership in Christian Organizations (3)

 

 

COM

4060

Social Influence (3)

 

Film Production Minor

18 hours

COM

2215

Introduction to Film and Video Production

(3)

COM

3020

Advanced Film and Video Production

(3)

COM

3025

Screenwriting

(3)

Choose 6 credits:

(6)

 

COM

4190

Organizational and Corporate Video Production (3)

 

 

COM

3370

Digital Video Editing (3)

 

 

COM

4100

Motion Picture Production (4)

 

 

MCM

4210

Recording Audio for Video and Film (2)

 

 

COM

2080

Video Production Practicum (1)

 

 

COM

2720

Film Criticism (1)

 

Choose one of the following:

(6)

 

COM

3030

The Impact of Film on Society (3)

 

 

COM

3035

Narrative Strategies in Film (3)

 

Los Angeles Film Studies Center (LAFSC):

Up to 6 LAFSC credits (FS392, FS 394, FS393) can substitute for COM 3020, COM 3370, or COM 3025)

 

Communication Course Descriptions

DRAMATIC ARTS

COM 1000—Production Participation and Project Attendance (0)

Required of all dramatic arts majors and minors for six (6) semesters. To receive a passing grade, students are to participate in 20 hours of some aspect of production work for each of the productions planned during the six semesters that are chosen by the student. Graded S/U. Note: No credit is given and no tuition is charged.

COM 2350—Creative Drama (3)

Course not concerned with play production, acting, or any of the theatrical entertainment aspects of drama. It focuses on drama used solely as a therapeutic and educational tool in the classroom. Participants will focus on creative leadership and teaching strategies that include the following: conflict resolution through drama, critical thinking and life skills development, historical re-enactment techniques in social studies, "teacher-in-role" role playing, imagination exploration, values through game–playing, creative drama for special needs, and drama–in–education techniques for creatively teaching all subjects.

COM 2410—Acting I: Theory and Practice (2)

An introductory workshop course focusing on beginning acting techniques and scene study. Students will explore the actors' instrument and the use of space, relaxation, concentration, imagination, movement, and how to pursue an objective through physical and psychological actions in order to create a character.

COM 2420—Acting II: Improvisation and Viewpoints (2)

A workshop course introducing students to the basics of improvisation for the actor. Students will create characters and scenes by applying some of the well-established improvisational techniques of Spolin, Johnstone, and others, and will develop useful acting tools by exploring both short-form and long-form improvisation. Students will also be introduced to the innovative viewpoints approach to character exploration and improvisation developed by Anne Bogart.

COM 2450—Drama as a Ministry (3)

The purpose of the course is twofold: 1) to expose students to appropriate dramatic experiences and expressions that may be incorporated into church ministry, and 2) to study drama as an art form in relation to theology, worship, Christian education, and spiritual formation. The course looks at the uses (and abuses) of drama ministry and seeks to demonstrate how it might serve as a means of grace in the life of the church, particularly in worship, community life, and outreach. The course focuses both on developing a theological understanding of the role of the arts in the life of the Christian and on exploring meaningful applications of drama to ministry.

COM 2460—Perspectives in Applied Theatre (2)

An overview of the field of applied theatre in which students explore its many creative, community-based uses and manifestations, including theatre for social justice, theatre for the autism spectrum, theatre for the incarcerated, theatre for the oppressed, and theatre for other marginalized communities

COM 2950—Script Analysis (1)

A detailed study of the basic tools and approaches necessary for reading and interpreting stage scripts before directing, acting, or design processes can effectively begin. (All dramatic arts majors and minors, as well as all theatre education majors, must take this course in their freshman or sophomore year, with the exception of transfer students).

COM 3170—Voice and Articulation (3)

Study of and practical experience in refining the vocal mechanism for general quality speech production. Includes intensive work with International Phonetic Alphabet and dialectology.

COM 3400—Theatre History and Dramatic Literature (3)

A comprehensive survey of representative plays from each period of theatre history, noting the reciprocal effects of production techniques on dramatic forms. Special emphasis is given to cultural and historical factors influencing the rise and fall of new dramatic forms and theatrical practices. It is recommended that students take COM 2950 as a foundation for this course.

COM 3410—Acting III: Meisner (2)

A workshop course introducing students to influential realistic acting techniques, particularly those of Sanford Meisner developed from the seminal work of the Group Theater. Students will learn to integrate exercise work strategically from this distinct acting approach into character development and scene study. (Prerequisite: COM 2410 Acting I or COM 2420 Acting II must be completed prior to taking this course.)

COM 3420—Acting IV: Shakespeare (2)

Explores the unique challenges facing actors who seek to make Shakespeare's plays accessible and meaningful to audiences today. Students will explore various performative aspects of Shakespeare's texts, including the complexities of scansion, building in speeches, word images and other language clues, physicality in Shakespeare, and character patterns (Prerequisite: COM 2410 Acting I or COM 2420 Acting II must be completed prior to taking this course.)

COM 3430—Movement I (2)

Trains the actor to communicate expressively with the body. The work includes exploration of space, energy, dynamics, rhythm, and sensory response. Actors develop techniques to transform their physical and emotional energy into dramatic action and character development.

COM 3440—Movement II (2)

Focuses specifically on the basics of tap and jazz dancing as related to training for the actor. It is recommended that students take: COM 3430 as a foundation for the course.)

COM 3450—Playwriting Workshop (2)

An introduction to basic storytelling and playwriting techniques for stage plays. Students will research and develop scripts for theatre in a workshop climate, with the goal of having two completed, professional or competition-ready scripts by the end of the semester.

COM 3550—Shakespeare (3)

Cross listed as ENG 3550.

COM 4030—Design and Production for the Stage (3)

A hands–on, introductory study of theatrical design and production that will primarily focus on scenic and lighting design and production. Costume design and production will be addressed briefly. In the process, students will practice design, construction, and implementation skills in conjunction with the current drama production as well as through individual project work. Prerequisite: COM 2950 or permission of instructor.

COM 4040—Play Directing (3)

An introductory examination of the directorial process beginning with textual analysis of dramatic action and covering such areas as production unity, stage movement and business, motivational analysis, and pictorial composition. Other areas of emphasis include a brief overview of directing history, types of directing theory and style, planning and rehearsal techniques, and the relationship of the director to other theatre artists. Student work includes selected scene work and directing projects prepared for class presentation culminating in a final scene presentation. Prerequisite: COM 2950 or permission of instructor.

COM 422 (A-F)—Drama Practicum (1)

Provides supervised participation and instruction in various aspects of theatre. Open to all students with the consent of the instructor. Dramatic Arts majors are required to take this one-hour practicum in three of the following areas: (a) Acting, (b) Stage Management, (c) Scenery and Props, (d) Costumes and Make-up, (e) Lighting and Sound, (f) Directing. Graded S/U.

COM 4250—Field Practicum in Applied Theatre (1)

An 80- to 120-hour field practicum in applied theatre supervised by a faculty liaison and an agency-based field instructor. Arrangements with the agency must be made during the preceding semester through the faculty liaison. The student will have a number of options for community-based work, usually based on the specific interests of the student.

COM 4410—Modern Drama in Performance (3)

Through a reader-response approach, students will read plays and view live, off-campus performances of plays written by award-winning American and European playwrights of the 20th century. The focus on experimentation with theatrical genres, the artistic development of social critique, and the re-emergence of meta-theatricality invites students to create meaningful connections between the "literariness" of drama, its performance, and audience reception. American playwrights include O'Neill, Odets, Rice, Hellman, Hansberry, Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller. European playwrights include Ibsen, Shaw, Chekhov, Pirandello, Lorca, Brecht, and Beckett.

COM 4600—Junior/Senior Seminar in Dramatic Arts (1)

A seminar designed specifically for juniors and seniors who are majoring in dramatic arts and theatre education. The seminar's focus is on developing materials (headshots, resumes, portfolios, etc.) essential to a graduate's success in professional theatre, graduate school, and/or teaching in secondary education. For theatre education majors, this course must be completed no later than the semester prior to student teaching.

INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

COM 2010—Interpersonal Communication (3)

A study of two–person (dyadic) communication. Topics include: human communication theory, verbal and nonverbal codes, development of self–concept, perception, impression formation, and relationship development. Preferred prerequisite for all courses leading to an Interpersonal Communication major.

COM 2020—Principles of Intercultural Communication (2)

A study of how culture affects communication behavior and intercultural relationships. This course provides a broad theoretical and contextual base that emphasizes intercultural communication competency as it relates to Western and non-Western cultures.

COM 2030—Practicum in Intercultural Communication (1)

A field-based, experiential course structured to provide the student with skill development opportunities in intercultural community service or ministry. The course must be taken concurrent with or subsequent to COM 2020. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

COM 2810—Small Group Communication (3)

Involves the study of theory and research of communication behavior in small problem–solving groups. Includes the effects of participants' personal characteristics and of situational constraints involved in small group interaction.

COM 3340—Language and Social Interaction (3)

An examination of communication as symbolic interaction between human beings within social contexts. The social construction of interpersonal and societal meaning primarily through the use and influence of language is analyzed.

COM 3350—U.S. Cultural and Ethnic Diversity (3)

Cross listed as SOC 3350.

COM 3500—Nonverbal Communication (3)

A study of the nonverbal forms of human communication. Special attention is given to the creation of meaning through such nonverbal forms as facial expression, gesture, bodily movement, use of space and time, voice, and environmental setting.

COM 4060—Social Influence (3)

Examines the role of communication and human relations in the initiation of attitude change and development within individuals, groups, community organizations, and other cultures. Consideration will be given to persuasive theory, diffusion of innovations, conflict resolution, and the development of working relationships between and within community groups.

ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION

COM 2750—Human Relations in Organizations (3)

Examines concepts and literature useful in analyzing interpersonal behavior in an organizational setting. Includes reading, simulations, case studies, and field observation of situations involving problems of morale, productivity, leadership, authority, communication and the introduction of change.

COM 3000—Principles of Public Relations (3)

Surveys the development, scope, and role of public relations in society and provides training in basic public relations skills. Includes practical experience with news releases, PR campaigns, communication schedules, and media strategies.

COM 3040—Human Resources Management (3)

Cross listed as BUS 3040.

COM 3150—Sales Fundamentals (3)

Cross listed as MKT 3150.

COM 3200—Sales Management (3)

Cross listed as MKT 3200.

COM 3220—Advertising Management (3)

Cross listed as MKT 3220.

COM 3260—Organizational Communication (3)

Examines organizations and organizational communication within broader social, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Strategies of organizing and communicating are analyzed from the perspective that organizations are embedded in a society's beliefs, values, structures, practices, and tensions.

COM 4560—Leadership in the Christian Organization (3)

A course designed to enable students to integrate leadership theory and Biblical principles into a workable philosophy of leadership. Because secular leadership theory is not always applicable in Christian organizations, careful attention is given to worldview, motivation, leadership style, team building, power, decision making, organizational culture, and conflict resolution. Cross listed as CED 4560.

MASS MEDIA AND JOURNALISM

COM 2080—Video Production Practicum (1)

Provides students with hands-on experience in video production (camera work, set design, control room procedures, editing), typically in conjunction with various campus projects. Prerequisite: COM 2215 Introduction to Film and Video Production or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

COM 2150—Station Staff Practicum (1)

Offers preparation for students desiring hands-on experience as station personnel (air personalities, board operator, sports production, news production), typically in conjunction with the campus student training station. Graded S/U. Requires permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

COM 2210—Introduction to Mass Media (3)

Founded upon an historical overview of the persons and technological discoveries that contributed to the origins of mass media, this course examines the advances, roles, and impact of mass media in a changing world. The contemporary convergence, contexts, and controversies of mass media are examined within print, electronic, information, and persuasion industries.

COM 2215—Introduction to Film and Video Production (3)

An introduction to the use of digital cameras for professional or personal digital filming. Training includes introduction to camera capabilities, movement, control, lighting, sound, and scene composition. Essential editing skills also introduced.

COM 2220—Audio Production (3)

A study of the equipment, principles, and techniques of audio production. Practice in creating original programs.

COM 2620—Writing for Mass Media (3)

Will teach mass communication students, regardless of their concentration, basic media writing skills. Emphasis is placed on a journalistic style of writing using AP style that is required by all media industries including radio, television, newspaper, internet, and public relations.

COM 2720—Film Criticism (1)

Students will learn several basic ways to "read" a film and how to respond to it descriptively, evaluatively, and interpretively through the writing of film reviews. Students will engage in the responsible, competent, critical evaluation/judgment of actual films. Some attention also will be given to generic influences, filmic literacy, and artistic accountability.

COM 2890—Newspaper Practicum (1)

Students will gain journalism experience by writing for the student newspaper on campus. Prerequisite: COM 2620 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits.

COM 2990—Principles of Digital Photography (2)

An introduction to digital cameras and digital photo editing. Each student must provide his/her own digital camera for use in the class.

COM 3000—Principles of Public Relations (3)

See course description under Organizational Communication course listings (COM 3000).

COM 3015—Digital Convergence Media (3)

Discussion of contemporary media and their impact on the individual and culture. Students will examine the convergence of computational, telecommunications and audiovisual media and will gain experience in the synergism of these media.

COM 3020—Advanced Film and Video Production (3)

Advanced instruction in the concepts and technique of video design and production.

COM 3025—Screenwriting (3)

An introduction to basic storytelling and screenwriting techniques. Students will research and develop multiple fictional screenplays. An on-going dialogue will be encouraged in the investigation of one's Christian faith and how it works itself out through creative endeavors.

COM 3030—The Impact of Film on Society (3)

An overview of international cinema art from the beginning to the present, including topics such as early cinema and silent film, the arrival of sound, the studio system, genre growth, distribution, mass marketing expansion, and digital technology. Emphasis is placed on the unique relationship between film production/presentation and social practices, and vice-versa, over the past century, as well as how new media continues to impact traditional narrative forms and the structure of the film industry.

COM 3035—Narrative Strategies in Film (3)

A course that exposes important theoretical and applied strategies used by studio and independent filmmakers to create narrative in either fiction films or documentaries. Students develop skills in recognizing and applying practices found in montage, mise-en-scene, various narrative structures, film language, auteurist tendencies, aesthetics of film sound, celebrity/star power, genres, and critical approaches to film.

COM 3050—Layout and Design (3)

Principles of newspaper and magazine design, including story selection, headline hierarchy, typography, and storytelling through the use of photos and other graphics. Practice in creating newspaper pages and magazine layouts and cover designs.

COM 3170—Voice and Articulation (3)

See course description under Dramatic Arts courses (COM 3170).

COM 3370—Digital Video Editing (3)

An overview of non-linear video editing, including the acquisition of digital video and the combination and editing of source material to create complete short digital video projects. Focus includes basic editing techniques, working with a timeline, capturing video, cuts and transitions, adding and altering audio, titling, keying, applying filters and effects, and exporting video. Prerequisite: COM 2215 or permission of instructor.

COM 3650—Advanced Reporting (3)

Attempts to simulate a newsroom. Students, through weekly reporting assignments, will learn to manage a beat, including spotting stories and trends, cultivating sources and organizing stories in a responsible and compelling way. Students will also study and practice advanced writing techniques and story structures. Prerequisite: COM 2620 or permission of instructor.

COM 3660—History of News/Journalism (3)

A survey of the history of journalism, including issues such as the evolution of news sources throughout history and a discussion of philosophy shifts (yellow journalism, etc.) The course will also examine changing technology and the way technology shapes content.

COM 3670—Digital Media and Online Journalism (3)

Contemporary journalists must be savvy in their use of multiple forms of digital media and ability to tell stories in several formats including print, video, audio and online. This course provides journalism students with experience using multiple digital media as well as programs to design both print and online news pages. Prerequisite: COM 2620 or permission of instructor.

COM 3680—Feature/Magazine Writing (3)

Focuses on feature style and magazine writing, with the purpose of developing the skills necessary to be able to research and write in-depth and reflective stories. This course will work in partnership with the Center for Social Justice in writing and producing the Micah Mandate magazine.

COM 4100—Motion Picture Production (4)

Collaborative development of a feature film or festival-ready short films, including all the legal documentation and rights to enable the finished production to qualify for festival submission. The course offers students the opportunity to make a motion picture production using locations, resources, and protocol. This course operates as a community-building experience where all students participate in at least one role in the production process. The workshop environment is specifically designed to meet the needs of both novice and experienced students.

COM 4140—Broadcast Journalism (3)

Provides instruction in the area of news collection, writing, and reporting for broadcast media. Individuals successfully completing this class should have an adequate working knowledge for an entry level position in the broadcast journalism area.

COM 4150—Issues in Journalism (3)

A capstone course that surveys trends, issues and ethical considerations that journalism majors will encounter in the industry such as bias, media ownership, the impact of technology, blogging, etc. Prerequisites: COM 2620 Writing for Mass Media, COM 3650 Advanced Reporting, and COM 3660 History of News/Journalism or permission from the professor.

COM 4190—Organizational and Corporate Video Production (3)

A study of the roles and points of view of the writer, producer, director and client and the dynamic relationship these participants share in the field of organizational and corporate video production. Students will produce videos for a variety of "clients" throughout the semester. Students will be working individually as well as in production groups (teams). Students will alternate roles (i.e., producer, director, PA, etc.) with each new group project. In addition to projects, assignments and specified readings, students will be required to participate in group activities both on and off campus occasionally on their own time. Prerequisite: COM 2215 or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ITI 4190.

COM 4300—Media Sales and Promotion (3)

Study of the practice and importance of sales and promotion in traditional and new media.

COM 4310—Advanced Audio Production (3)

Advanced instruction in the concepts and technique of audio design and production.

DEPARTMENTAL OFFERINGS

COM 1010—Speech Communication (3)

A study of the principles and practices of effective human communication, with emphasis placed on public speaking. The course emphasizes the critical thinking and skill development necessary for effective speech. Listening skills are included in the study.

COM 2060—American Sign Language I (3)

A study of the use of American Sign Language in meaningful context, including the extensive building of sign vocabulary, the development of strategies used by a Deaf/hard-of-hearing person to communicate effectively, and the understanding of cultural issues facing members of the Deaf community. Students interact in a natural setting with Deaf/hard-of-hearing models.

COM 2070—American Sign Language II (3)

In addition to the deeper examination of concepts learned in COM 2060, students will begin practicing the art of interpreting. (Prerequisite: COM 2060 or permission of instructor)

COM 2230—Oral Interpretation (3)

A study in the techniques of interpretation for oral reading applied to various types of literature. Emphasis is given to selection of material, analysis of content, characteristics of verbal delivery, and methods of nonverbal interpretation. Students will work with prose, poetry, and dramatic forms of literature. Oral reading of scripture is also emphasized. Prerequisite: COM 1010 or permission of instructor.

COM 2500—Argumentation and Debate (3)

A study of the nature of reasoned discourse. Attention is given to the process of analyzing an issue, structuring arguments, using evidence, and handling refutation and rebuttal in oral communication. Actual classroom debate will enable speakers to practice the principles being studied. Prerequisite: COM 1010 or permission of instructor.

COM 3010—Theories of Communication (3)

Surveys the major theories of human communication. The study will focus on the origins, usefulness, and limitations of each theory for understanding communication events. This course will help prepare students to analyze and interpret human communication in all its forms (intrapersonal communication, interpersonal communication, small group transactions, organizational communication, public speaking, drama, and mass communication).

COM 3070—The Rhetorical Tradition (3)

Provides an introduction to the study of rhetoric and historic public address. The course focuses on the manner in which people have used discourse to influence the behavior of others and includes a broad survey of rhetorical theorists from Corax to contemporary scholars.

COM 4000—Advanced Public Speaking (3)

Gives students practical experience in the preparation and presentation of the speeches that are usually required in business and the professions. Areas of instruction include speech making, oral reading of reports, and speech for radio and television. Prerequisite: COM 1010 or permission of instructor.

COM 4210—Forensics Practicum (1)

Individualized instruction for students who participate in speech competition. Training is provided in both speech making and oral interpretation. Graded S/U.

COM 433R—Readings in Communication (1–3)

Readings directed toward Interpersonal Communication, Organizational Communication, Mass Media, Dramatic Arts, or other areas of communication.

COM 4330—Directed Study in Communication (1–3)

Individual guided study and research on special problems related to Interpersonal Communication, Organizational Communication, Dramatic Arts, Mass Media, or other areas within the discipline of communication. Projects must be approved by the instructor before enrollment.

COM 4510—Career Internship in Communication Studies (1–3)

Intensive study, observation, and participation in various field projects designed and contracted between the student and instructor. Internships will be arranged in conjunction with the student's major. Supervision is coordinated with the Career Services Office. Maximum of 6 hours. Graded S/U.

COM 453 (A-D)—Special Topics in Communication Studies (1-3)

A course designed for upper division students who are investigating the interrelationship of various aspects of communication in the following areas: (a) interpersonal communication, (b) mass media, (c) dramatic arts, (d) organizational communication.

COM 4550—Research Methods in Communication Studies (3)

Introduces students to the most commonly used qualitative and quantitative methods of research associated with the discipline of communication.

COM 4800—Senior Project in Communication Studies (1-2)

All majors in the Department of Communication Studies are required to present a senior project as a public performance. The project should relate to the student's specialized interest in the field, demonstrate his or her acquired skills, and be academically and vocationally beneficial as a culminative experience. The project must be approved by the faculty advisor at least one semester in advance. The number of credits is contingent upon the number of hours given to the project [40+ hours for one (1) credit; 80+ for two (2) credits.] Graded S/U.

ART

ART 2000 Introduction to Drawing (3)

Designed for beginning-level drawing students, this course emphasizes the study of other artists' drawings and direct observation of subject matter as a means of enhancing visual perception and technical skill.

ART 2010 Intermediate Drawing (3)

A studio course introducing the student to a variety of drawing processes and media which may include charcoal, pen and ink, ink wash, colored pencil, chalk pastel, and oil pastel. Examples of historical and contemporary art combined with studio problems and related homework assignments provide the format for experimentation and creative expression. Pre-requisite: ART 2000 or permission of instructor.

ART 2020 Two-Dimensional Design (3)

A guided investigation of terminology, concepts and basic materials utilized in the studio by visual artists and designers. Students will develop an awareness of the formal elements of composition, a working knowledge of their fundamental principles and sensitivity towards the interrelationship between form and content. The study of color will include the color wheel, color schemes, juxtaposition affect, vibration, color mixing, and color separation. Visual sensitivity is developed by solving a series of 2-D problems, employing a variety of media and materials. Principles taught in this course have direct application to all art media and provide a foundation and direction for learning skills in other courses.

ART 2025 Three-Dimensional Design (3)

A study of design principles applied to creating 3-dimensional artwork. Students will design and construct sculpture on a small scale, experimenting with modeling, casting, carving, assemblage, and mixed media.

ART 2030 Introduction to Painting (3)

Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of painting. This course is designed to develop the student's ability to accurately perceive and translate color while effectively organizing pictorial space and compositional ideas. A variety of media and techniques will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 2000.

ART 2040 Intermediate Painting (3)

Expands upon basic skills learned in Introduction to Painting, emphasizing compositional organization and the use of color as an expressive element. Includes critical analysis of assignments. Pre-requisite: ART 2000 and ART 2030.

ART 2150 Art Appreciation I (3)

First in a two-part survey of western and non-western art history and styles through the study and criticism of painting, sculpture, and architecture from ancient civilizations to the Renaissance period. This course will also examine processes and materials used by artists throughout history.

ART 2160 Art Appreciation II (3)

A continuation of the study of art and its influence on culture from the Renaissance to the modern period. This course will also examine processes and materials used by artists throughout history. Recommended Pre-requisite: ART 2150.

ART 2200 Mixed Media (3)

An introductory overview of studio art processes, media, and art appreciation with an emphasis on creativity. Using traditional and non-traditional materials, students in this course develop inventive experimental approaches to a variety of pictorial media. This course is especially useful for students who will be using art in a clinical or classroom environment. Appropriate for non-art minors.