Skip to Content

MORE

Pre-Occupational Therapy (B.S.)

Pre-Occupational Therapy (B.S.)

Overview

Pave the way for others to lead full and productive lives 

If you desire to help people of various ages function fully in their day-to-day lives, a career in occupational therapy (OT) may be a great choice for you. 

Earning a bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science with a concentration in Pre-Occupational Therapy can lead to many diverse opportunities within the OT profession. Occupational therapists offer a variety of services, depending on the age of a patient.  

Therapists can choose to work alongside children with challenges or disabilities. According to the American Occupational Therapy Association, “Many practitioners choose to help children thrive in the ‘occupations’ of childhood, which include learning, playing and growing. Therapists work in schools with students who have learning disabilities or behavioral problems. Others work with premature newborns at pediatric hospitals or children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other disabilities.” 

Occupational therapists also assist people recovering from an injury to regain core skills needed for daily life. Additionally, some therapists provide support for older adults who are facing physical or cognitive changes. They offer rehabilitation, for example, to those who’ve experienced traumatic injuries, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease or mental health issues.  

Overview

Pave the way for others to lead full and productive lives 

If you desire to help people of various ages function fully in their day-to-day lives, a career in occupational therapy (OT) may be a great choice for you. 

Earning a bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science with a concentration in Pre-Occupational Therapy can lead to many diverse opportunities within the OT profession. Occupational therapists offer a variety of services, depending on the age of a patient.  

Therapists can choose to work alongside children with challenges or disabilities. According to the American Occupational Therapy Association, “Many practitioners choose to help children thrive in the ‘occupations’ of childhood, which include learning, playing and growing. Therapists work in schools with students who have learning disabilities or behavioral problems. Others work with premature newborns at pediatric hospitals or children with cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other disabilities.” 

Occupational therapists also assist people recovering from an injury to regain core skills needed for daily life. Additionally, some therapists provide support for older adults who are facing physical or cognitive changes. They offer rehabilitation, for example, to those who’ve experienced traumatic injuries, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease or mental health issues.