traditional undergraduate on campus

General Studies

The Associate of Arts in general studies degree gives students a flexible, well-rounded foundation that includes a diverse and broad understanding of fundamental subjects. In addition to completing core liberal arts courses, students choose two 12-hour themed bundles of coursework from the following disciplines: business, leadership, psychology, health care, criminal justice, ministry and general studies. Graduates with this degree can seamlessly transition to one of Trevecca’s degree-completion programs or any four-year degree program.

Upcoming Start Dates:

Online:
Feb. 21, 2023
May 23, 2023

Deciding on a degree program or a career path right out of high school can be daunting. Fortunately, there’s an option that gives you extra time to choose a major as you pursue a degree.

Trevecca’s Associate of Arts in general studies is ideal for students who need a flexible program that will prepare them to pursue a variety of four-year degrees. You can even take advantage of state and federal aid offered specifically for two-year degrees on the way to earning a bachelor’s degree. 

The Associate of Arts in general studies includes 30 hours of liberal arts courses; six hours of religion courses; and two 12-hour course bundles in your discipline of choice: business, leadership, psychology, health care, criminal justice, ministry or general studies.

The themed course bundles offer a perfect on-ramp into one of Trevecca’s degree-completion programs, including a six-hour head start toward a bachelor’s degree. You’ll have the opportunity to explore at least two separate career fields while you build a solid background of knowledge and experience.

Courses are fully transferable to most four-year institutions.

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Course Descriptions

Get details on all the courses you’ll complete as you work toward this degree at Trevecca.

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Financial Aid & Costs

Financial Aid & Costs

Nearly every student at Trevecca receives some form of assistance in paying for college. Learn all about the affordability of a TNU education and options for receiving aid.

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Here’s a look at the approximate tuition rates you could expect for this program at Trevecca, including the cost per credit hour and the total tuition expense for the full degree program. Please note that rates and fees are subject to change.

Here’s a look at the approximate tuition rates you could expect for this program at Trevecca, including the cost per credit hour and the total tuition expense for the full degree program. Please note that rates and fees are subject to change.

Cost/Credit Hour

$353

Hours

60

Tuition Cost*

$21,180

*$150 Student Resource Fee assessed per course. Books are not included.

Career Opportunities

Graduates with an Associate of Arts degree in general studies will be prepared for entry-level positions in the fields represented by the themed coursework bundles. Associate of general studies degree-holders will also be prepared to pursue a four-year degree and can transition seamlessly into one of Trevecca’s degree-completion programs, having already earned six credit hours toward a bachelor’s degree in one of these areas:

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Course Descriptions

Get details on all the courses you’ll complete as you work toward this degree at Trevecca.


English Composition I
ENG 1020

Emphasizes the recursive writing process through appropriate determination of subject, audience, purpose, and style, with correct usage of grammar, punctuation, and logical organization. Students will use appropriate technologies for writing and learning.

English Composition II: Critical Reading, Writing, and Thinking
ENG 1080

Emphasizes intellectual and analytical reasoning through reading and writing assignments. Includes instruction in library and research technologies and the writing of a research project.

Speech Communication
COM 1010

A study of the principles and practices of effective human communication, with emphasis placed on public speaking. The course emphasizes the critical thinking and skill development necessary for effective speech. Listening skills are included in the study.

Financial Stewardship
BUS 2010

Provides the student with a basic understanding of his or her economic environment and the basic principles and tools of personal financial management. Emphasis will be placed on personal financial planning, including budgeting, managing personal debt, insurance, taxes, investments, and real estate. When possible, topics will be analyzed and discussed from a Christian perspective.

Introduction to Health and Wellness
HPE 1500

Designed to assist the student in their understanding and development of a healthy lifestyle. Emphasis is placed on the components and behaviors that promote lifelong, positive outcomes in the five dimensions of wellness: physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and spiritual. Includes a fitness laboratory component. Fee charged.

Introduction to Biblical Faith
REL 2000

An introduction to Biblical faith and literature designed to help the student acquire a knowledge of the basic content of Scripture as well as be able to employ basic Bible study skills.

Christian Tradition
REL 3000

An introduction to theology as it has developed in the history of the church with a view to understanding the relation between faith and life. Special attention is given to understanding the doctrine of holiness.

Fine Arts
MUS 1500

Designed to give students a historical perspective of music, art, sculpture, and architecture from ancient times to modern times.

HISTORY (CHOOSE ONE)
World Civilizations: Ancient and Medieval World
HIS 1400

A course of study from ancient times to the 1500s dealing with persistent and recurring political, social, and economic issues in history that thinking people have examined and that have shaped our contemporary world. This course covers Western and non-Western cultures. Offered every semester.

World Civilizations: Early Modern and Modern World
HIS 1450

A course of study from the 1500s to the present dealing with persistent and recurring political, social, and economic issues in history that thinking people have examined and that have shaped our contemporary world. This course covers Western and non-Western cultures. Offered every semester.

 

MATHEMATICS (CHOOSE ONE)
Problem Solving: A Quantitative Reasoning Approach
MAT 1080

This course is designed to promote students' understanding and appreciation of mathematics and to develop quantitative and problem solving skills. The course will further introduce students to a wide range of applications of mathematics to modern life. Topics will be selected from linear and non-linear models, logic, sets, probability, counting techniques, statistics, matrices, and game theory.

Concepts of Mathematics
MAT 1040

Considers the realm of mathematics as some of the greatest ideas of humankind-ideas comparable to the works of Shakespeare, Plato, and Michelangelo. This course will introduce students to several of these ideas, selected from topics in numerical patterns, infinity, geometry, topology, chaos, probability, and statistics. Study of these topics will not only demonstrate the beauty of mathematics but will also develop critical thinking skills. This course is designed for liberal arts majors to satisfy the general education requirement.

Problem Solving: A Quantitative Reasoning Approach
MAT 1081

This course is designed to promote students' understanding and appreciation of mathematics and to develop quantitative and problem solving skills. The course will further introduce students to a wide range of applications of mathematics to modern life. Topics will be selected from linear and non-linear models, logic, sets, probability, counting techniques, statistics, matrices, and game theory. MAT 1081 includes an additional credit hour allowing the necessary prerequisite mathematics to be covered so that students placing into INT 0960 can be successful in completing the content of MAT 1080.

 

SCIENCE (CHOOSE ONE)
Life Science
SCI 1500

A study of biological concepts including the chemistry of life, principles of inheritance, evolutionary theories, biological organization of various organisms, and relationships between organisms and their environment. Issues related to current advances in biotechnology and medicine are also considered. The process of scientific inquiry is emphasized and practiced in both the lecture and laboratory. Fee charged.

Physical Science
SCI 1600

Designed to convey the nature of matter and methods of study in the physical sciences and to study physical science concepts; issues and values related to the well-being of individuals, society and the environment are considered. Lecture and lab. Fee charged.

 

INTERCULTURAL LITERACY (CHOOSE ONE)
Principles of Intercultural Communication
COM 2025

A study of how culture affects communication behavior and intercultural relationships. This course provides a broad theoretical and contextual base that emphasizes intercultural communication competency as it relates to Western and non-Western cultures.

American Sign Language I
COM 2060

A study of the use of American Sign Language in meaningful context, including the extensive building of sign vocabulary, the development of strategies used by a Deaf/hard-of-hearing person to communicate effectively, and the understanding of cultural issues facing members of the Deaf community. Students interact in a natural setting with Deaf/hard-of-hearing models.

English Acquisition (FE-10)
ESL 3150

Current approaches, methodologies, techniques, and materials for teaching English language learners primarily in K-12 setting. Designed to provide theoretical and practical experience in language acquisition. Fee charged. Course includes 10 hours of field experience in ESL classrooms, which must include a 6-12 setting.

French Language and Culture
FRE 1000

An introduction to French language and culture, with an emphasis on conversational skills in cultural contexts.

Spanish Language and Culture
SPA 1000

An introduction to Spanish language and culture, with an emphasis on conversational skills in cultural contexts.

Biblical Hebrew I
HEB 2200

An introduction to the basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew. Primary emphasis upon grammatical construction, verbal forms, and translation.

New Testament Greek I
GRK 2200

An introduction to the basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. Primary emphasis upon grammatical construction, verbal forms, and advanced translation practices.

International Economic Development
ECO 3300

An introduction to the economics of development in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and in the nations of Eastern Europe that are undergoing transition from socialism to capitalism. Relevant economic theory will be combined with institutional and structural analysis and Biblical principles to explore problems such as poverty, income inequality, unemployment and rural stagnation. The impact on development of education, health care, capital formation, trade, foreign assistance, foreign investment and macroeconomic policy will be examined.

Fundamentals of World Geography
GGY 2050

An introduction to geography that explores the impact of geography on the world's major social, linguistic, religious, and economic systems.

World Music and Culture
MUS 2440

A study of the development of indigenous music of Eastern and Western cultures and how that music is both a product of and a contributor to those cultures. The class will be taught with an anthropological approach that views each particular culture through the lens of the music that each culture produces.

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE / BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (CHOOSE TWO)
Interpersonal Communication
COM 2010

A study of two-person (dyadic) communication. Topics include: human communication theory, verbal and nonverbal codes, development of self-concept, perception, impression formation, and relationship development. Preferred prerequisite for all courses leading to an Interpersonal Communication major.

General Psychology
PSY 2010

General introduction to major areas of psychology with emphasis on the psychological bases for understanding human behavior. A recommended prerequisite to other psychology courses except PSY 2175.

General Sociology
SOC 2010

The nature and functions of sociology, the development of social ideas and institutions and the processes of social interactions and social structure. A recommended prerequisite to courses in Sociology numbered above 2000.

World Civilizations: Ancient and Medieval World
HIS 1400

A course of study from ancient times to the 1500s dealing with persistent and recurring political, social, and economic issues in history that thinking people have examined and that have shaped our contemporary world. This course covers Western and non-Western cultures. Offered every semester.

World Civilizations: Early Modern and Modern World
HIS 1450

A course of study from the 1500s to the present dealing with persistent and recurring political, social, and economic issues in history that thinking people have examined and that have shaped our contemporary world. This course covers Western and non-Western cultures. Offered every semester.

Principles of Macroeconomics
ECO 2000

An introduction to the study of macroeconomics with an emphasis on the issues of inflation, unemployment and growth. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department except as noted.

Introduction to Anthropology
ATH 3010

A study of the meaning of culture, the diversity of cultures in both the contemporary world and the past, and the manner by which cultures have adapted and developed. Attention will be given to the work of anthropological theorists and to the four subdivisions of anthropology: cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, linguistics and archaeology.

United States History Survey I
HIS 2010

Survey of United States' social, political, economic, and military development to 1877. Offered annually.

United States History Survey II
HIS 2020

Survey of United States' social, political, economic, and military development from 1877 to the present. Offered annually.

American Political Institutions
POL 2020

The origins and development of American government, with emphasis on the concept of participatory democracy as practiced in our republican form.

The Family in Society
SOC 2500

A study of the functions of the institution of family and the inter-relationship of family and other major institutions in society including the ways in which current social conditions and cultural, ethnic, and economic diversity influence this relationship. Current sociological research on family behavior will be examined and a Christian perspective on family emphasized.

Social Problems
SOC 3200

A sociological description and analysis of some of the contemporary social problems in American Society with an emphasis on programs designed to help remedy these problems.

Urban Sociology
SOC 3300

An examination of urban lifestyles, problems, development, and change from a historical perspective, providing both theoretical and practical background for analysis of various urban conditions, and seeking to identify and apply practical solutions to these problems. A major experiential learning component is field work and ethnographic research in core urban Nashville neighborhoods. A section on urban planning and urban ministry is included.

Introduction to Social Work
SWK 1200

This course offers an introduction to the field of social work and its mission of social justice and equity at the micro (individual), mezzo (group), and macro (community and organization) levels of society. Students will explore the history, key theories, and diverse work of the profession with consistent focus on often oppressed and marginalized communities. Throughout this course, students will discover the core values, ethics, personal skills, and characteristics required of social work practitioners.

*For a complete list of courses, tracks and other relevant information, view the program's course catalog.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do I have to retake so many high school-type courses?
The Associate of Arts in general studies degree provides students with a broad, well-rounded liberal arts education. Some courses may be similar to those you took in high school. The more subject-specific courses are offered in the themed bundles: business, leadership, psychology, health care, criminal justice, ministry and general studies. You’ll choose two bundles to study, earning 12 credit hours each.
Do I have to choose one of the themed bundles?
No, you can select a general studies bundle that allows you to pick and choose available courses from any of the other bundles.
Can I apply the Tennessee Promise scholarship toward this program?
Yes, Trevecca is an eligible institution for this scholarship. Tennessee Promise provides students a last-dollar scholarship, meaning the scholarship will cover the cost of tuition and mandatory fees not covered by the Pell Grant, the Tennessee HOPE scholarship or the Tennessee Student Assistance Award.
Is an associate’s degree worth it?
Yes! There are many benefits to earning an Associate of Arts degree. For some students, an associate’s degree prepares them for entry-level positions in the workforce. For the majority of students, however, it’s the first step in earning a four-year degree.

Students appreciate the flexibility of the Associate of Arts in general studies degree because it gives them the opportunity to explore two different disciplines for 12 credit hours each, which may then be transitioned seamlessly into one of Trevecca’s degree-completion programs.

The Tennessee Promise scholarship also applies to the Associate of Arts in general studies program, drastically reducing the student’s financial burden.
Can I transition into a bachelor’s degree after I complete my associate’s degree?
Yes, classes completed as part of a student’s associate’s degree in general studies can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. Upon completion of the associate’s degree, students can discuss their course plan with an academic advisor and formulate a continued, seamless path of study.